Tag Archives: Food

Holy guacamole, look at this crime scene!

I’ve said before that the biggest political disagreement between my wife and me is that I see salsa as an excuse to devour tortilla chips. In contrast, she sees tortilla chips as merely a salsa delivery system. Today I am finally vindicated. Builder Loke has opened our eyes to the sadistic nature of tortilla chips. Look at the way they mock Mr. Avocado, smearing the remains of his friend across their bodies. It’s disgusting. They have to be stopped. I’m going to go eat as many tortilla chips as I can. I urge you to join me. Mr. Avocado, we’re doing it for you.

The fruits of your LEGO labor

Feeling hungry? Vincent Kiew has created this delicious looking arrangement of fruits. A durian stars as the centre piece, with its spikey texture recreated by using 1×1 wedges placed at different angles. A slice of the fruit is also featured, demonstrating its yellow fleshy insides, squashed between a white border. The durian is complimented by a vibrant orange with translucent pieces representing its inner segments. Standing tall and proud, the watermelon slice is constructed out of angled wedges creating its conical portrayal. The purple fruit is possibly a mangosteen, due to its bulbous white centre portrayed by dome corner pieces. All the fruits have wonderful rounded forms which conveys Kiew’s skills in creating realistic shapes.

Fruits

Let’s hope this LEGO durian smells better than a real life one, as the fruit is famous for its overwhelming odour. Still feeling peckish? Why not check out some of our other articles on tasty looking meals recreated in LEGO form.

A good crust makes the pie

As any baker knows, a good pie starts with the crust. Now, what a good crust is can be debated, but the creator of this culinary confection definitely did something right. Aside from the masterful latticework overlayed on the filling of translucent reds, builder Timofey Tkachev kneaded out a crispy crust of baguettes. This nice parts usage was made possible by wedging the baguettes onto flags built into the structure of the filling. A little friction helped place the rest, achieving a nicely textured outer edge to the pie.

Pie

Keyed into culinary display techniques, Timofey gave us wonderful details like sprigs of herbs, a dragon wing as filling oozing out onto the table, and stray bits of the crust where the slice of pie was cut.

Pie

If this has your mouth watering, check out some of the other desserts hanging out in the bakery. Just remember that, like the food in commercials, brick-built food is strictly inedible.

Missing Maine and feeling blue.

A couple of years ago I got to spend a month-long sabbatical from work on the coast of Maine. I really, really wish I could go back. While I was there, I enjoyed quite a bit of lobster, but nothing quite as rare as this blue version from Walter Whiteside Jr. In nature, a blue lobster is the result of a one in two million genetic mutation. In LEGO, the blue lobster is even more rare. In fact, this is the only one I’ve ever seen. With the great organic shaping and realistic details, it’ll certainly do in a pinch. (Get it? Because of the pincers? Okay, that was a bad pun. Nevermind.)

Don’t eat the blue lobster!

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LEGO Master Chef enters the automat

In case you’re wondering, automats are basically vending machine restaurants. Tons of little windowed boxes hold cold and hot fair available to any customers that drop a few coins in its slots. Well, before inflation and fast food pretty much killed them. Still, I can’t help but be reminded of these eclectic bits of culinary history when looking at this lovely sandwich built by Australian LEGO Master Henry Pinto. White bread with a mysterious orange cheese over some tomatoes and lettuce is exactly what you might find in an automat vending machine. Though white bread can be pretty bland and gummy, Henry’s solid LEGO reproduction is wholly satisfying. Each slice is two studs high with a smooth nougat crust attached to the white interior using modified bricks with studs on the sides. Sloped tiles used in the crust capture the pudgy corners of the bread, contrasting the sharp angles of the greens and the slices of tomato peaking out. Meanwhile, sloped bricks create the distinct cut in the sandwich which I hope runs all the way through the model.

LEGO Sandwich

I will remind you that you shouldn’t eat LEGO food, despite how appetizing builders might make it look. Though, you might actually want to grab a snack before you get lost in more of Henry Pinto’s masterful models.

The Battle of Drumstick Glade

As you know over at The Brothers Brick, we love a good brick build insect. And this LEGO creation by Ted Andes features a lot of them! The ants are completely brick build. They are made out of droid arms, clip claws, t-bars, and bricks with studs on 4 sides. They even have a small gaster made out of tooth plates. We are currently watching a battle between the Blackthorns and the Lavender Leaf ant clans. My bet is the Blackthorns are the black ants and the grey ants are the Lavender Leafs. They are fighting over a half-eaten pheasant leg on the ground. I’ve seen a lot of uses for the curved tapered panel but I’ve never seen it used as a pheasant leg. For the foliage, it looks like Ted dismembered a bunch of LEGO flower bouquets. Which seems like a good cause in this case.

"The Battle of Drumstick Glade"

Forgot your lunch? Here’s a BYGGLEK Bento Box.

In my youth I used to watch a lot of anime, and of course with most of it being created in Japan during that time, snippets of daily Japanese life found their way into the animations; school uniforms, cherry blossom trees, and of course Bento boxes – neatly home-packed meals. The fairly new BYGGLEK boxes produced as a collaboration between LEGO and Ikea are perfect for creating LEGO Bento, which builder nobu_tary has expertly done here.

#BYGGLEK Bento

Rice balls, veggies, and more! These foodstuffs are all expertly brick-built, some – like the rice balls are constructed by way of the SNOT (studs not on top) technique, utilizing some basic pieces such as slopes and bricks and others such as the two tomatoes are built regularly and are composed of only a couple pieces. These colorful food builds certainly capture the colorful palette of Japanese cuisine. The cover of the box is also colorfully decorated with a nice mosaic pattern built out of variously shaped tiles which can be found in the LEGO Dots line. Nobu_tary did not forget the utensils either – the chopsticks here being shaped by various cone and cylinder pieces topped with some 1×1 bricks and plates. Certainly this build is a palatable one indeed.

Biting hard into this bar of chocolate may land you a visit to the dentist

I had to do a second take as I was scrolling the LEGO channels on Flickr on this one, did someone accidentally drop a non-LEGO creation into the feed? Upon closer inspection, I was pleasantly surprised to see a familiar builder, nobu_tary and an actual 1:1 scale of a chocolate bar. Without the tooth elements in silver, I’d probably need to take a third look just to make sure. I got to admit, the chocolatey  2×4 Flat Tile can make one salivate especially when it looks quite delicious at this angle and lighting. I think what does the trick is smooth bite formed by the inverted arch brick paired with a 1×2 flat tile. Then again, how is a bite ever this smooth? I’ve been fooled nevertheless.

chocolate

A charcuterie board complete with cheese and a mouse?

Okay, so maybe this isn’t quite a charcuterie board, I am still unclear on the concept, but I do know such boards were trending in the blogosphere over the holidays. Ted Andes does give us a great minimal LEGO model of a cheese board of sorts with all the essentials – even the casual kitchen mouse.

Cutting the Cheese

The board is simply constructed out of one tile panel and several plates in alternating brown and dark tan. As for the arrangement of elements topping the board; we’ve got the mouse from series 18 of the collectible minifigures, for the Swiss cheese we have a minifigure torso in light yellow – arms removed, and of course to slice and dice the cheese there is a minifigure machete which looks great as a cheese knife and then the silver slotted slope piece as a shredder. This little assortment is certainly social media ready.

Baking outside of the box

Pastries on Netflix’s Nailed It never look as tasty as this LEGO IKEA BYGGLEK cake made by Milan Sekiz. To be fair, the builder has the advantage of using uniformly shaped plastic to craft the frosted layers, instead of fumbling with a piping bag. IKEA Serbia commissioned Milan to build the unique creation before the BYGGLEK’s October release. The two candles are very apropos marking the celebration of LEGO and IKEA’s collaboration.

LEGO IKEA BYGGLEK Cake

Using the BYGGLEK for the actual purpose of storage is still a big part of this creation. The boxes also contain a plate, silverware, and a sample slice of the cake all built from LEGO elements. With stacks of detail, Milan completes the confection with a reference to “the cake is a lie” meme in his Instagram post, made famous by Portal. This sweet taste of ignorance is bliss!

Nothing fishy about this sushi ship

Hungry? Grab your chopsticks and get tucked in to Anakin Skywalker 2012‘s LEGO sushi. Brought to your table in a classic serving boat, there are all kinds of sushi delights to enjoy. This looks like a complete feast, with the palette of bright LEGO colors making for an appetizing spread — and who’d have thought shiny black tiles (normally so difficult to photograph well) would look so good as the gleaming seaweed wraps on the maki rolls. The serving boat is excellent, too, with a smattering of discolored tan bricks included to create the impression of a well-used piece of serving ware. And if you’re thirsty, there’s nothing better than a flask of sake to share with a friend. Presented all together, this is one tasty piece of LEGO building.

[LEGO] Sushi Ship

Did someone order a bowl of ramen?

A frequent staple of the Brothers Brick, LEGO Designer Markus Rollbühler knows his way around the LEGO kitchen. He’s dished up a hearty broth containing soft flex hose noodles, minifig leg mushrooms, some yolky eggs, and a white and pink spiraled narutomaki. Gotta say the photography really helps the model shine as well. I’d order this in a restaurant.

101 Bricks: LEGO Ramen

Hungry for more? We’ve got you covered for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Why not have some dessert while you’re at it?