Tag Archives: Dinosaur

Prehistoric palaeontology pieced perfectly with plastic

I have no idea how accurate these are but Damian Thomas pulled a great feat of replicating the shape and structure of a few prehistoric monster skulls using LEGO Technic parts in white. What we have are the skulls of a Dilophosaurus, a Triceratops and a Tyrannosaurus Rex in the respective order below. They’re all so good I can’t decide which is my favourite. If you’re lovin’ all things prehistoric and composed of calcium goodness, the closest official set of an arrangement of bones from LEGO  is the recent 21320 Dinosaur Fossils Ideas set.

Dilophosaurus Skull [1:1]

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Tyrannosaurus Rex Skull MOC

LEGO Ideas 21320 Dinosaur Fossils now available [News]

The latest LEGO Ideas set 21320 Dinosaur Fossils is now available from LEGO. The set features three skeletons including a T. rex, Triceratops, and Pteranodon. It also includes a minifigure skeleton and a paleontologist. The set comes with 910 pieces and retails for US $59.99 | CAN $79.99 | UK £54.99.

Be sure to check out our incredibly in-depth review of 21320 Dinosaur Fossils to learn how accurate these LEGO recreations are.

And if you’re looking for older Ideas sets, the incredible 21309 NASA Apollo Saturn V is currently 25% off on Amazon US. Check it out in the link below.



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Head to the Cretaceous period with the newest LEGO Ideas set: 21320 Dinosaur Fossils [News]

Today LEGO has unveiled the latest set from its crowdsourcing platform LEGO Ideas, 21320 Dinosaur Fossils. The set features two dinosaur skeletons of T. rex and Triceratops, as well as the flying Pteranodon. It also includes a minifigure skeleton as LEGO Sapiens, along with a living relative in the form of a paleontologist. With 910 pieces, the set will retail for US $59.99 | CAN $79.99 | UK £54.99, and will be available to purchase starting Nov. 1. We’ve already got our hands on a copy of this set, so be sure to check out our early review of 21320 Dinosaur Fossils.

Check out all the details below, including the full press release and images.

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LEGO Ideas 21320 Dinosaur Fossils – assembling T. rex & Triceratops & Pteranodon, oh my! [Review]

Even though my primary fascination with the past has always been through archaeology, the science of paleontology has also provided a wonderful source of inspiration about the amazing world we live in. Officially unveiled today, the latest LEGO Ideas set is 21320 Dinosaur Fossils, so I was especially excited to get building with an early copy of the set that LEGO sent The Brothers Brick. The new set includes 910 pieces with two minifigures and will go on sale November 1st (US $59.99 | CAN $79.99 | UK £54.99).

Editor’s note: This LEGO Ideas set identifies and labels the individual species of each extinct creature included in the set, so you’ll find that we refer to them using binomial nomenclature, with scientific names in italics and abbreviations like T. rex for Tyrannosaurus rex rather than “T-Rex”. If you think Andrew gets pedantic about Star Wars lore, just wait until he digs into a scientifically inspired LEGO set like this!

Read our hands-on review of LEGO Ideas 21320 Dinosaur Fossils

This T. rex doesn’t want to hunt, he wants to be fed!

Thanks to regular building contests held by the LEGO Ideas team, hundreds of fantastic custom creations have seen the light in the recent couple of years. The Unleash Your Own Genetically Modified Hybrid Dinosaur! building competition gathered some of the craziest and funniest creatures of this summer. As we continue seeing some of the best entries as the builders share them elsewhere online, we can’t help but admire this hilarious Veggiesaurus by Scott Wilhelm.

Veggiesaurus, Lex, Veggiesaurus!

Well, we know there were a lot of vegetarian dinosaurs, but a creature like a “vegetarian Tyrannosaurus” sounds like either a freak of nature or the triumph of modern science. Looking at the pictures of this foody, I tend to think it’s a win rather than a failure. A full-length picture of the T. rex reveal the actual size of the build; the furniture and table accessories elevate the work to a whole new level. And although this Tyrannosaurus rex looks very frustrated, I hope it will feel much better once he finishes his dinner.

scale

Raawwr! No one beats a Tyrannosaurus Rex

We’ve covered Jonas Kramm‘s series of vignettes based on Jurassic Park all the way up to the climax of the movie. Has it been a thrill-a-minute? You bet your 65-million year old amber cane it has! The last we saw, the power to the park had been turned off by Dennis Nedry as he attempted to steal and escape with frozen dino embryos. This of course caused havoc at the park, with all the dinosaurs escaping; this is not a big problem when we’re talking about a mild-mannered Brachiosaur, but it is when there are T. rex and Velociraptors amongst the beasts.

And that is exactly the issue Dr. Sattler has as she tries to restore power to the security system; she has climbed down into the maintenance area, only for a nimble and crafty raptor to attempt to eat her. They can open doors, you know. Jonas has packed the small footprint of the vignette with loads of details, especially the black fencing that forms the border. The grating everywhere gives it a technical look, perfect for a breaker room, and the panel with the lever looks great. The raptor bursting through to eat Ellie is terrifying, though, so let’s move on to a happier scene.

16 - Maintenance

Click to see the final two vignettes in this epic series

The Jeeps and Explorers that everyone wanted

Can there ever be enough dinosaurs in the world? Well, in a world without any living dinosaurs, I would have to say no. Where’s the Deinonychus with a saddle to take me for a ride, or the Quetzalcoatlus flying service I dreamed of as a kid? Nowhere, since places like Dinotopia and Jurassic Park only existed in science fiction. Jonas Kramm tries to fill some of the void inside me with his awesome vignettes from the first movie of the Jurassic franchise, which is appreciated but never enough.

Speaking of voids, that is just what Jonas fills in this next set of builds, with both the Ford Explorer and Jeep Wrangler many fans of the film complained were absent from any of the official LEGO sets so far (especially the huge 75936). The Jeep stolen by Dennis Nedry is stuck in the mud and high pointed on a log, and the hapless tech wizard has been blinded by the toxic spit of the Dilophosaurus. A stud shooter is cleverly used as the log under the Jeep, and the crowbars make a great frame for the windshield as they did in LEGO set 75916‘s Jeep).

12 - Spit

Click to see the rest of these dino-riffic vignettes

Objects in picture are larger than they appear

With the recent release of the Jurassic Park: T. rex Rampage set, I can imagine that many LEGO fans will want to recreate more of a scene for the legendary dinosaur–the largest LEGO has ever made–to inhabit. At first glance, that would appear to be exactly what Richard Van As has done, but his creation is, in fact, much larger than even that dino! It seems fitting to me, as we learned in Jurassic Park that objects are sometimes larger than they appear.

Lego Jurassic Park T-Rex Breakout MOC

Building in the larger scale, Richard couldn’t rely on minifigures to represent the characters, or any other specialized molded pieces, but still managed to unmistakably capture likenesses of Dr. Alan Grant and Dr. Ian Malcolm. The entire display is complete with all the right details from the movie scene, including a full interior for the car and a goat in the tyrannosaur paddock (though I think it was eaten already at this point). Flick through the rest of the album and see what hidden details you can spot!

Lego Jurassic Park T-Rex Breakout MOC

Life, uh, finds a way...to eat you.

Even before LEGO’s recent release of 75936 Jurassic Park T-Rex Rampage, dinosaurs have been a popular subject for builders. ZiO Chao has apparently found the historically-based thunder lizards a bit too tame, though. Why just recreate a single species when you can add in a bit of mad science to remix the most fearsome aspects of three of them? ZiO has combined the raptor, T-Rex, and spinosaurus into a reptilian death machine named Spino-Tyraptor. This model is highly poseable, including some creative arm joints using pneumatic T-pieces. The head is expertly shaped, and the use of a spoiler for the tongue really works well.

Spino-Tyraptor

Just as nature intended, the most eye-catching part of the creature is the fin. Carrying the dark red of the head along the spine, it reaches up with brighter reds highlighted with grey and orange 1×1 round plate and capped with quarter-round coral tile. We may not know what the true function of spinosaurus’ fin was, but I’m guessing here it’s a combination of threat display, heat regulation, and wi-fi antenna. Hey, if you’re going to genetically mix something like this, why stop at what nature thought of?

Spino-Tyraptor

Mother knows best

LEGO builder Kai/Geneva‘s Dinosaur Nest creation is a fine example of both landscaping and unorthodox use of parts. I love the sloping of the tan and dark orange parts. Together they add to the ancient world of the dinosaurs seen here. The nest itself is made of seemingly random brown and dark brown pieces, and the lack of uniformity of the parts that make up the nest add to its realism, suggesting that the mother velociraptor gathered the sticks herself for her young.

Dinosaur Nest

“As the mother velociraptor sees her chicks appear, she calls to them, beginning a lifetime of affectionate communication and warnings of danger. After all, who knows what larger carnivores are lurking nearby. Now, we must be careful as to not be seen by the mother — Oh no! I’ve been spotted! Run!”

Dinosaur Nest

What’s the matter kid? You never had lamb chops?

Faster than a T. rex can eat a lawyer, Jonas Kramm continues cranking out Jurassic Park vignettes. After bringing us the raptor dig and introductions of John Hammond and Dennis Nedry, Jonas now takes us to the Tyrannosaur paddock. Everything about this scene is iconic from the colorful Ford Explorer touring vehicle to the T. rex bait behind the fence. There is some excellent composition here, including the angling of the fence and lush landscaping behind it. Judging by the smile on Lex’s face, she probably hasn’t seen the goat yet.

06 - T.rex paddock

See more amazing LEGO Jurassic Park vignettes

Prehistoric sea serpent poised to strike

Recently I wrote an article that mentioned there are a few names that spring to mind when considering LEGO-built characters. Another one of these prolific builders is Anthony Wilson. His newest creation is Aquasaurus, an impeccable display of form and function working so well together, that it hurts my head.

Aquasaurus

His incredible use of colour is always refreshing to see. This build harks back to the colour palate exclusively used for the Arctic City and Town sets, which I have always enjoyed. Relatedly, one thing that separates this from the pack, are those excellent gill fins, set in the ever-elusive teal. Though not made of many pieces in this elegant creature, the contrast it creates is brilliant. In a creation of such scale, articulation can also be a challenge to hide and keep functional. Wilsons subtle use of colour specific Bionicle parts, achieves this flawlessly, giving the limbs of this creature an exceptional pose. I find myself wondering how much this beast would weigh, as his use of balance on that black pillar is great, leaving only a tiny footprint of a base below.

For another look at Anthony Wilson’s beautiful use of colour, check out his Western Woods.