Tag Archives: Tyrannosaurus Rex

Head to the Cretaceous period with the newest LEGO Ideas set: 21320 Dinosaur Fossils [News]

Today LEGO has unveiled the latest set from its crowdsourcing platform LEGO Ideas, 21320 Dinosaur Fossils. The set features two dinosaur skeletons of T. rex and Triceratops, as well as the flying Pteranodon. It also includes a minifigure skeleton as LEGO Sapiens, along with a living relative in the form of a paleontologist. With 910 pieces, the set will retail for US $59.99 | CAN $79.99 | UK £54.99, and will be available to purchase starting Nov. 1. We’ve already got our hands on a copy of this set, so be sure to check out our early review of 21320 Dinosaur Fossils.

Check out all the details below, including the full press release and images.

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LEGO Ideas 21320 Dinosaur Fossils – assembling T. rex & Triceratops & Pteranodon, oh my! [Review]

Even though my primary fascination with the past has always been through archaeology, the science of paleontology has also provided a wonderful source of inspiration about the amazing world we live in. Officially unveiled today, the latest LEGO Ideas set is 21320 Dinosaur Fossils, so I was especially excited to get building with an early copy of the set that LEGO sent The Brothers Brick. The new set includes 910 pieces with two minifigures and will go on sale November 1st (US $59.99 | CAN $79.99 | UK £54.99).

Editor’s note: This LEGO Ideas set identifies and labels the individual species of each extinct creature included in the set, so you’ll find that we refer to them using binomial nomenclature, with scientific names in italics and abbreviations like T. rex for Tyrannosaurus rex rather than “T-Rex”. If you think Andrew gets pedantic about Star Wars lore, just wait until he digs into a scientifically inspired LEGO set like this!

Read our hands-on review of LEGO Ideas 21320 Dinosaur Fossils

Raawwr! No one beats a Tyrannosaurus Rex

We’ve covered Jonas Kramm‘s series of vignettes based on Jurassic Park all the way up to the climax of the movie. Has it been a thrill-a-minute? You bet your 65-million year old amber cane it has! The last we saw, the power to the park had been turned off by Dennis Nedry as he attempted to steal and escape with frozen dino embryos. This of course caused havoc at the park, with all the dinosaurs escaping; this is not a big problem when we’re talking about a mild-mannered Brachiosaur, but it is when there are T. rex and Velociraptors amongst the beasts.

And that is exactly the issue Dr. Sattler has as she tries to restore power to the security system; she has climbed down into the maintenance area, only for a nimble and crafty raptor to attempt to eat her. They can open doors, you know. Jonas has packed the small footprint of the vignette with loads of details, especially the black fencing that forms the border. The grating everywhere gives it a technical look, perfect for a breaker room, and the panel with the lever looks great. The raptor bursting through to eat Ellie is terrifying, though, so let’s move on to a happier scene.

16 - Maintenance

Click to see the final two vignettes in this epic series

The Jeeps and Explorers that everyone wanted

Can there ever be enough dinosaurs in the world? Well, in a world without any living dinosaurs, I would have to say no. Where’s the Deinonychus with a saddle to take me for a ride, or the Quetzalcoatlus flying service I dreamed of as a kid? Nowhere, since places like Dinotopia and Jurassic Park only existed in science fiction. Jonas Kramm tries to fill some of the void inside me with his awesome vignettes from the first movie of the Jurassic franchise, which is appreciated but never enough.

Speaking of voids, that is just what Jonas fills in this next set of builds, with both the Ford Explorer and Jeep Wrangler many fans of the film complained were absent from any of the official LEGO sets so far (especially the huge 75936). The Jeep stolen by Dennis Nedry is stuck in the mud and high pointed on a log, and the hapless tech wizard has been blinded by the toxic spit of the Dilophosaurus. A stud shooter is cleverly used as the log under the Jeep, and the crowbars make a great frame for the windshield as they did in LEGO set 75916‘s Jeep).

12 - Spit

Click to see the rest of these dino-riffic vignettes

Life, uh, finds a way...to eat you.

Even before LEGO’s recent release of 75936 Jurassic Park T-Rex Rampage, dinosaurs have been a popular subject for builders. ZiO Chao has apparently found the historically-based thunder lizards a bit too tame, though. Why just recreate a single species when you can add in a bit of mad science to remix the most fearsome aspects of three of them? ZiO has combined the raptor, T-Rex, and spinosaurus into a reptilian death machine named Spino-Tyraptor. This model is highly poseable, including some creative arm joints using pneumatic T-pieces. The head is expertly shaped, and the use of a spoiler for the tongue really works well.

Spino-Tyraptor

Just as nature intended, the most eye-catching part of the creature is the fin. Carrying the dark red of the head along the spine, it reaches up with brighter reds highlighted with grey and orange 1×1 round plate and capped with quarter-round coral tile. We may not know what the true function of spinosaurus’ fin was, but I’m guessing here it’s a combination of threat display, heat regulation, and wi-fi antenna. Hey, if you’re going to genetically mix something like this, why stop at what nature thought of?

Spino-Tyraptor

LEGO 75936 Jurassic Park T-rex Rampage now available for VIPs with Space Rocket Ride promotional set [News]

You can now own and build the largest dinosaur ever created in a LEGO set. 75936 Jurassic Park: T. rex Rampage is now available to LEGO VIP members for US $249.99 | CAN $299.99 | UK £219.99. LEGO VIP membership is free, but if you don’t want LEGO perks and the occasional free set with purchase, this terrific Tyrannosaurus will be generally available beginning July 1st.

Also the LEGO Ideas 40335 Space Rocket Ride promotion we reviewed a few weeks ago is now available with purchases more than $99 through the end of the month, so the behemoth Jurassic Park set certainly qualifies. Too bad the dinosaur can’t fit on the space ship…

LEGO 75936 Jurassic Park: T. rex Rampage, the biggest LEGO dino ever [Review + Interview]

Last week, LEGO announced the biggest set yet in the Jurassic World license, 75936 Jurassic Park: T. rex Rampage. While most of the LEGO Jurassic World theme has centered around the new films starring Chris Pratt, this is the second time LEGO has revisited the 1993 Spielberg classic film, following 75932 Jurassic Park Velociraptor Chase last year. With 3,120 pieces, this new set banks on scale with a huge Tyrannosaurus Rex and Jurassic Park gate, which are much larger than minifigure scale. In addition to our usual review, we also had the chance to speak to LEGO Senior Designer Mark Stafford about the set. T. rex Rampage will retail for US $249.99 | CAN $299.99 | UK £219.99 beginning June 19th for LEGO VIPs, with general availability beginning July 1st.

Click to read the full review

LEGO reveals 75936 Jurassic Park T-Rex Rampage featuring the largest dinosaur ever in an official set [News]

Welcome… to LEGO Jurassic Park. LEGO has officially revealed 75936 Jurassic Park: T. rex Rampage, a behemoth of a set towering nearly a foot and a half high and clocking in at 3,120 pieces. The set comes with the largest brick-built dinosaur ever released in an official LEGO set–a gigantic Tyrannosaurs Rex–along with the iconic front gate to Jurassic Park and six minifigures including John Hammond, Ian Malcolm, Ellie Sattler, Alan Grant, Ray Arnold and Dennis Nedry.

The set will retail for US $249.99 | CAN $299.99 | UK £219.99 beginning June 19th for LEGO VIPs (free for anyone to join) with general availability beginning July 1st.
Update: be sure to read our review of 75936 Jurassic Park: T. rex Rampage, which includes an interview with the set’s designer.

 

Click to get a closer look at this epic Jurassic Park set

Tyrannosaurus drives, tyrannosaurus rex!

When communicating with other people, have you ever noticed that LEGO pieces can be much more effective than words? Especially when describing unusual things, like, uh… a hilarious red T-rex on a six-wheel drive with a wrecking ball instead of his tail? Words are helpless! However, LEGO 7 manages to convey the idea just perfectly and designs an amazing creature. Now, this is what I’m talking about!

DINOTRUX-Ty Rux

The TBB Field Guide to LEGO Dinosaurs: A Jurassic World Compendium [Review and Infographics]

When the new wave of LEGO Jurassic World sets came out, we couldn’t wait to get our hands on the dinosaurs. The children in us immediately began stomping them around and making roaring noises. Here at The Brothers Brick, we are not ashamed to say we get giddy while playing with toy dinosaurs. We’re also not ashamed to say we are serious nerds. After our dino-dueling escapades, we began to wonder how accurate they are to the real things. As far as scientists can hypothesize, that is. So we did some not-so-archaeological digging — after all, it’s palaeontologists who study dinosaurs, not archaeologists, as Andrew our Editor-in-Chief (and resident archaeology buff) likes to remind everybody!

As it turns out, there is a vast amount of knowledge that scientists have obtained from the fossils of these creatures. That being said, there is a lot of information that they still don’t know, as well as much heated debate on the truth about each one. The Jurassic Park and Jurassic World franchise has been both heavily criticized and applauded for its attempts at realism. But without getting too wrapped up in the debates, we’ll take a look at the best working knowledge of these dinosaurs. So put on your favorite leather vest or red bandana and paleontologist’s expedition hat, because away we go!

Read on to unlock the mysteries!