Tag Archives: PaulvilleMOCs

The envy of all band nerds

In 5th grade, my classmates and I had the option to pick up an instrument and join the school band. I desperately wanted to play the drums but my parents couldn’t stand the thought. My second choice was the saxophone, simply because it looked rad as heck. All those pearl and gold keys! Shiny, soulful, sultry: the royalty of reed instruments… This little sax, built by musician and LEGO artist PaulvilleMOCs , brings me back to those days. It truly is unique – especially this tribute, with its banana gooseneck and other neat elements such as binoculars and a roller skate for sections of the body/keys.

Practice Makes Perfect

I’m envious of Paul and his saxophone, and I wonder if he plays as beautifully as he builds. Back then, my mom took me to the music store where I was already taking piano lessons, and upon hearing the “member discounted” price of a sax, almost had a heart attack. I ended up with a family friend’s clarinet – which felt like a small step up from the boring 4th-grade recorder. But as a dutiful band-nerd, I kept with it until I switched to its cooler cousin, the bass clarinet, in high school. One of a kind in a symphonic band of 60+. Total rockstar… And I could barely remember a lick of it now.

Bowl your arms off!

While I am known for having a dark sense of humor, I can assure you this title was provided by the builder himself. PaulvilleMOCs graces us with this fabulously retro LEGO bowling sign. The colors, the fonts and the shapes are all indicative of signs seen outside of bowling alleys across America. When you’re a bit out of shape a round of bowling can feel like you’ve bowled your arms off. However, this double entendre refers to the arm-less minifig torsos used throughout. There are two in the bowling pin, one in the exclamation point and a third comprising the back end of the red arrow. Clever parts usage like that makes us wonder what other tricks Paul may have up his non-existent sleeve. Non-existent because; no arms. OK, you got it then? Good! Seriously, these jokes just write themselves. I don’t even have to try anymore.

Bowl your arms off!

Will Luxo Jr. ever be held responsible for its malicious letter smashing?

Paulville MOCs is no stranger to our pages, racking up almost as many hit creations as the Emeryville, CA-based animation studio Pixar. This little scene perfectly captures the multi-jointed lamp Luxo Jr and the distinctive company font with long serifs formed by partial clip connections and bit of flex tube.

Pixar Logo

Wondering what the letter “I” looked like before it got squashed by that devious lamp? Paulville’s got you covered.

The prominent minifigure torso in the lamp is the latest Iron Forge seed part being used by builders the world over in the latest free for all round. Our own Ben Stenlund recently used some to great effect as birdhouses.

This fossil collection wins, arms down

There have been a number of great LEGO creations built for the Iron Forge challenge recently. The seed part, or the element that each entry needs to use is the Minifig torso, sans arms, and PaulvilleMOCs makes masterful use of white torsos (one in each fossil).

Paleontology Museum

While the ones on the T-rex and the Triceratops are obviously used for the skulls, trading shoulder sockets for eye sockets, you have to look more closely at the Pterosaur, to find it sprouting wings.

Paleontology Museum

The Bricks are Busted!

Builder Paul has struck cartoon character gold again, this time with his LEGO builds of teenage characters Candace Flynn and Vanessa Doofenshmirtz from Disney Channel’s Phineas and Ferb. Both characters are known for their attempts at “busting” their family members for their crazy antics.

BUSTED!!

Using a variety of bricks, slopes, and tiles in varying sizes Paul did an excellent job at fashioning these brick-built characters accurately via the SNOT (studs not on top) technique. The most difficult component for these characters to render correctly in bricks would be Vanessa’s more curvy frame as well as the round faces of these particular characters in comparison to the more angular faces of some other characters in the show such as Dr. Doofenshmirtz. I think the tooth shaft in pink which Paul utilizes in order to render Vanessa’s lips is an example of some pretty creative parts usage. What can I say? Paul has done it again, and I as well as many other fans are definitely hoping to see some more brick-built versions of other characters from this beloved television show.

The Doofenshmirtz-inator!!!

“Doofenshmirtz Evil Incorporated” – if you’ve watched the legendary Disney channel cartoon Phineas and Ferb, in your head you probably heard the little jingle that goes along with this quote. Paul brings the lovable and goofy villain from the show – Dr. Doofenshmirtz to life with his LEGO version of the character.

Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz

The white lab coat and black turtle neck – the signature look of Dr. Doofenshmirtz is brick-built using various sized tiles, slopes, and bricks by way of the SNOT (studs not on top) technique. The rest of good ol’ Doof is also composed of bricks and other pieces, my favorite parts usage being Paul’s use of the small claw pieces in black as tiny eyebrows and a couple reddish brown tooth shafts to render some spiky tufts of mad scientist hair. Of course I am a fan of the classic 2×2 round tile eye pieces which work perfectly for Doofenshmirtz’s cartoony face. It is always great to see pop culture subjects rendered in LEGO, and Paul did an excellent job with this character build.

Forget your screw gun, try this screw blaster instead

There are always some people in the LEGO community who insist that certain pieces are worthless. Maybe it is the Big Ugly Rock Pieces (or BURPs); maybe it is the Juniors airplane; or maybe it is the ubiquitous stud shooter. The latter is much derided by those who wish their Star Wars battle packs came with normal blasters, rather than the huge and ugly things whose sole purpose is to lose studs behind the couch. Kids love ’em, at least. But perhaps the stud shooters are not so useless after all; PaulvilleMOCs shows us how elegant the part can be as a drill, for example, with a wand as the drill bit. Add in a circular saw and a sander, and you have a set of power tools perfect for a job site. This was built for the Iron Forge competition, where the stud shooter is the seed part; so expect to see some more studly builds in the days to come!

Power Tools

You build...raptors?

From Jurassic Park to Jurassic World, velociraptors have remained a fan favorite in the series. While the raptors in Jurassic Park were hungry killing machines, Jurassic World gave us lovable trained carnivores. The scenes of Owen Grady bonding with Blue since birth are memorable, and I bet Owen would be proud of this wonderfully detailed LEGO version of Blue built by PaulvilleMOCs. There is a pleasing balance of form and function here. A splash of color keeps the model visually interesting, while ball & socket and hinged joints allow Blue to “strike a pose.” I really like Blue’s mouth, which consists of a 1×3 hinge tile, with the finger wedged between a modified 1×1 plate with clip. Finishing off the mouth is a dark pink minifig hand, which makes for a really cool-looking tongue.

LEGO Jurassic World Blue Velociraptor Left

And if you still haven’t had your prehistoric fill, the builder has also done a fun rendition of Mr. DNA.

Mr. DNA