About Faiza Khan

Faiza is a life long fan of LEGO who has since 2018 become a more serious collector and aspiring MOC maker. His other hobbies include: pop culture consumption, traveling when possible, gaming, and good conversation.

Posts by Faiza Khan

Eggman, eggrobo, and the coveted green emerald!

A lot of LEGO fans probably wish LEGO Sonic was a real theme. As it is, we’re lucky that we even got a Sonic the Hedgehog minifigure from the Dimensions theme. On the bright side though, LEGO elements are a great medium to play around with when it comes to recreating characters and scenes from Sonic games and cartoons. Ivan Martynov demonstrates just that, with his brick-built Dr. Robotnik and Eggrobo.

Doctor Robotnik

Martynov’s builds definitely make use of a lot of technic elements and larger molded pieces. Dr. Robotnik’s signature glasses are depicted by teal round bar and pin holder 1x1s, while his egg shaped nose utilizes a pink bulb piece. Eggrobo’s gloved appearing hands make use of the shaft with hand element. Overall, given how unique and round these characters and their features are, Martynov does an excellent job rendering them with LEGO elements.

A cute little beaver couple

I always say I’m a sucker for cute things, but who doesn’t love adorable woodland creatures? Kyohei Ito showcases his brick-built and BrickHeadz-sized cuties, and I am just loving them.

Beaver

The two little beavers are mostly fashioned out of different sized reddish-brown slopes along with a few bricks and tiles. Their tails utilize wing pieces that are turned over – this creates the necessary scaly effect. The eyes for these guys are the same 1×1 printed tiles that are in the escape pod vs. dewback microfighters set. My favorite use of parts here has to be the minifigure scuba fins which emulate beavers’ real-life webbed feet and the 1×1 toothed plates which give the little critters their signature buckteeth. Sometimes a person just needs a little cuteness to brighten their day; hopefully, these builds help fill the daily quota.

Is it time for a LEGO duet?

In late 2020, LEGO released a LEGO grand piano in the Ideas line of their products, but you know what would go great with a LEGO Piano? A LEGO violin of course, and CK Ho on flickr crafted a beautiful brick-built violin for music fans to enjoy.

VIOLIN

Unlike the piano, the violin is notably a curvy instrument, therefore the notion of a brick-built violin already presents a challenge in shaping the form of such an object with LEGO bricks. This builder smartly utilizes reddish brown brick arches in order to create the curving body of a violin with LEGO. The rest of the violin’s corpus is comprised of reddish-brown bricks, plates, and tiles arranged by way of the SNOT (studs not on top) technique.

Click to see more of this LEGO violin

A Nice Turkey Dinner Works All Year Round

Sure it’s January but that doesn’t mean we can’t have a nice gathering with immediate family involving fancy turkey dinners. In fact, during this ongoing pandemic, a fancy dinner at the dining room table could be just what you need to break away from the monotony of lockdown life. That being said, Jonas Kramm’s dining room model is good to go for all seasons.

09 - Dining Room

The interesting use of elements is what really draws me to this model. I really love Kramm’s use of the tennis racket element in his wicker chair builds. The blonde hair-piece next to the turkey element really makes an appealing souffle. Other eye-catching uses of parts include a single red stud in a bowl either serving as ketchup or cranberry sauce and of course, the lamps made out of the black sausage pieces connected to golden eggs. Kramm’s model is just filled with a warm family vibe.

A Quaint Season’s Greetings Scene

Winter is here, and I’m sure many folks are transitioning from holiday cheer to some peace and quiet. This little A-Frame micro-scale build by KitKat1414 certainly embodies the more quiet nature of early January.

Solitude

Although this model is on the smaller side, there is so much to love. The base is built using the SNOT (studs not on top) technique, while the cobblestone pathway leading to the small home utilizes slopes and tiles placed on their sides, not making connections to studs. The use of the crutch element as a doorway is particularly clever, and I also enjoy the croissant piece in white used to render snow. The little builds comprising snow-covered evergreens and the brown leafless tree add the perfect winter touch to this mostly snowy white build. This model certainly feels a lot like winter.

The panic room of your childhood nightmares

Remember when your parents told you that there weren’t monsters under your bed, in your closet, or outside your window? Well, this LEGO build by Flickr user Brixe63 certainly paints a different picture. Not only are there monsters in this little brick-built room, but the room itself is also a monster!

Gefangen im Alptraum

The wallpaper for this room is built out of white and sand green plates and tiles. The monster window utilizes modified 1x1s and 1x2s with teeth pieces in white and red, depicting a bloody mouth fresh after a kill perhaps. Many dark green vine elements creep from the door or erupt through the walls and floor like tentacles looking for a fresh grab. There’s even a ghostly white minifigure hand reaching out from the little cabinet whose drawers are made out of brown bucket handles. The floor is made out of tiles laid on their sides not connecting to any studs, this is a good approach for this build as they can be arranged in a messier way in order to give the floor a lively appearance. This room is definitely a room out of a childhood nightmare, and I am glad I am not the poor minifigure lying in bed in terror.

Row, row, row your boat, gently down the ruins?

Kayaking, canoeing, and boating of other types are pretty popular where I live. While Jesse van den Oetelaar’s LEGO model seems to portray a more medieval type scene, this build reminds me of a real life historic park not too far from me, where you can kayak on a creek amidst the ruins of an aqueduct.

Fractured Kingdoms

Jesse’s minifigure character William Renou paddles a brick-built sail boat which utilizes many small brown elements, notably many tiles of various sizes for the body of the boat while the sail mast utilizes multiple brown 1×1 round bricks. The water in this model is rendered with white trans-clear tiles, which is a bit different from most builds I have seen which tend to make use of trans-clear elements in various shades of blue. The white trans-clear elements are a good choice and they work well with the mostly grey color-scheme of the architecture.

The aqueduct ruins mostly make use of 1×2 brick elements, slopes, tiles, light green tree limb elements, and various other light grey pieces. I especially appreciate the cattails that are fashioned out of tan technic pins attached to brown sticks which were then stuck into the holes of tree limb elements. While the fantasy vibe is evident throughout this work, the vignette is still quite relatable in real and present moments as well.

The Coveted Mythosaur Skull Pendant

We all saw the child sporting a very fashionable Mythosaur skull necklace in season one of The Mandalorian (no season two spoilers here). If you can’t find one of these beauties online why not build one for yourself like Luis Peña García has out of LEGO elements?

Peña crafts his LEGO version of the pendant using a menagerie of light grey elements, small black plates in various sizes, and a couple pieces in flat silver. In order to give the skull form, Peña mainly utilizes the light grey slopes and tiles in various shapes and sizes while the black plates that the grey pieces are assembled on serve as the negative space creating eye and nose sockets. Peña most cleverly uses a few binocular pieces in grey for the teeth of the fictional creature. Overall this build is spot on in its depiction of the Mythosaur skull pendant, wear one of these babies and the Mandalorians will know that you are legit!

A mech in desolation

Roaming around in desolation, a well-armed mech makes its way. This detailed mech model built by Carter, showcases how LEGO is the perfect medium for mech building.

'Brigand' Mobile Frame

Firstly the parts usage exhibited in this build is fantastic, my favorites being the brown minifigure backpacks used as ammo storage and the roller skate pieces rendering shoulder artillery. Out of some common black elements including the whip piece, 1×2 grill, and 1×4 wing piece – just to name a few, Carter fashions a distinguished arm-gun. A piece of shoulder armor usually found in buildable figure sets, is utilized as a cockpit of sorts. While the mech build is certainly the centerpiece of this model, the ground it walks on is also interestingly put together – comprised of a mosaic of 1×2 brown slopes. Overall this build is definitely and inspiration for imaginations everywhere.

Making and scraping a way through the galaxy.

Junk traders and scrappers are very common hobbies or occupations in the Star Wars universe. Not everyone can be a top politician from Coruscant, and in the outer rim territories dealing in junk is practically a way of life. Thomas Jenkins’s LEGO model certainly embodies the ingenuity and scrappy spirit of such a universe.

What I love most about this model is that it is truly from the imagination, it is not something we’ve seen on screen, but it most certainly looks like it could be from Star Wars. Of course the build utilizes many key elements that create the overall aesthetic, most notably the sail from Jabba’s barge and some imperial cargo boxes. The dark red and white bricks and tiles utilized in the bottom fin and two side-wings give the appearance of parts scrapped from Republic ships, while the grey elements give off an imperial vibe. The model as a whole looks like a speeder bike mixed with a hang-glider and a T-16 Skyhopper; it is certainly something I could imagine gliding around on Tatooine.

Quite literally, pieces of Zen.

Life in the current moment is what it is. With the holiday season and ongoing pandemic in full effect; I think it’s safe to say we are in stressful times, but a little Zen can certainly go a long way. Builder Stefan Kofler does us all a favor with this gorgeous and amazingly peaceful floating island LEGO model, complete with a lush cherry-blossom type of tree and little Asian-styled dream cottage. Just by looking at this build, I feel utterly at peace.

tree

The color-scheme of this model does a lot of visual heavy-lifting. The light green plants, lavender flower petal and stem pieces, light grey round plates and tiles serving as a stony walkway, as well as the white and light blue elements used for the house; perfectly contrast against the darker colored elements comprising the base of the island as well as the trunk of the tree and foundation of the building. The light blue cylinders, cones, and 1×1 studs used in the roof for the cottage mixed with the same elements in white or light grey create a marbled appearance when looking at the build from afar.

tree_view_3

Every component of this build seems to have been meticulously put together as the tree, house, and island itself clearly are comprised of many small elements combined. Honestly, I could look at this model all day while picturing myself floating on a little peaceful island containing much natural splendor.

Space themes on wheels

Generally, when one thinks about yore’s classic space themes, big spaceship builds come to mind and occasionally a tiny rover. The G Brix gives us something different – a very large LEGO rover which can be flipped over, each side with its own aesthetic, depending on your mood it can be Blacktron or the Space Police.

Space Police/Blacktron Flipover Rover

The space police portion of the build uses vibrant translucent red elements, including the cockpit, and brilliant blue elements such as tiles and wing pieces. Of course, there are some distinguishing printed “police” tiles and slopes.

Space Police/Blacktron Flipover Rover

Now flip the build over and you get a very cool blacktron build complete in the black and yellow color scheme. Signature elements also included here are the yellow trans-clear cockpit and the printed slope with the blacktron logo.

Space Police/Blacktron Flipover Rover

This vehicle is a model and an RC car as well that can be controlled through an app. Overall it is an awesome build for any fan of classic space themes villainous or heroic.