Tag Archives: Jungle

An outpost from the past

This Pioneer Outpost by Ayrlego recycles the cabin from an earlier north-western themed build and a tower from an even earlier effort. Builders enhancing their earlier works is nothing new, but even recognizing the “seed builds” doesn’t diminish the achievement here. The cabin is now elevated well above the water line, fully integrated into a dense forest of greenery. Are those pink flamingos lawn ornaments or actual wildlife? Maybe one of each? But look beyond those pops of color and you can find great details like the vine on the roof – that looks like a cut up sprue from around the 3-leaf LEGO plant element. That’s some unusual part usage – and a great way to recycle.

Pioneer Outpost, Camp Isaac

Love immersive scenes like this? Check out our achieves for more vignette goodness!

King of the Builders

The premier LEGO competition Iron Builder is back! Kit Nugent starts the round strong with this wonderful king of the jungle. This round’s seed part is the Friends Horse Saddle in dark azure which Kit used 38 times here. The side of the saddle works beautifully as the very Aztec-styled half circles. The white throne has some fantastic part use as well, including white claws and teacups. Lush greenery and the blurred foreground give this a fantastic sense of depth. Stay tuned for more Iron Builder coverage to come!

"Now I'm the King of the Builders ...

Microscale Waterfall Temple

Microscale LEGO builds can either be the most beautiful or the wonkiest creations out there. Builder Gilles de Crombrugghe pulled all the stops when it came to creating this gorgeous jungle temple scene, from nice piece usage to clever techniques. The choices he made helped create an engrossing, detailed, and realistic scene that feels like an Indiana Jones version of Polly Pocket. Opposing orientations for bricks help create the smooth blue outline of the pool of water. Headlight bricks in the base help attach the waterfalls which cascade serenely to clouds of mist made of ice cream and popcorn pieces. Brown Technic chainlinks make for a wonderful rope bridge with plenty of rickety slack. Steep, stony islands of meticulously sculpted slopes and modified tiles rise from the water, isolating the long-forgotten sacred grounds. At least, until the research team found their way there.

Continue reading

Present your oblation at this jungle altar

As I’m sure you’ve read in other posts on here recently, we are smack-dab in the middle of another round of Iron Builder. Here is one more entry featuring the red canopy seed part from LEGO builder Jake Hansen. What really stands out to me in this build, besides its Crash Bandicoot-inspired color scheme, is all Jake’s interesting parts usage. The use of upside-down green baseball caps for leaves is genius, as is sticking those 1×1 curves onto the ends of roller skates at the base of the altar. I’m an absolute sucker for a design that connects parts in atypical ways. I also love the texture change in the base of the model, from the rolling curves of the jungle vegetation to the blocky stone of the path leading up to the altar. And as for that tree in the background, I’m definitely not not stealing the tube-filled trunk design for my own builds. The Iron Builder gods will be pleased!

Jungle Altar

Exploring the Jungle From a Kayak

LEGO builder Markus Ronge has quite the green thumb! Check out his incredible Jungle Explorer Tree creation. Most LEGO trees I’ve seen go straight up from the ground, but this one curves up convincingly from the rock face. The surrounding vegetation is highly varied and shows the skill Markus has in knowing exactly where each brick should go. Both I and the kayaking minifigure are very impressed.

Lego Jungle Explorer Tree

Sometimes you just gotta make sacrifices around here

The kind of sacrifices we make nowadays involves a shorter lunch break to get more work done or maybe even buying a less flashy car in order to help put the kiddos through college. In the world of ancient Mesoamerica, however, sometimes their sacrifices involve blood, really cool pyramids, and serpent gods. Captainsmog has pieced together a LEGO creation called Sacrifice to Quetzalcoatl. With the dense jungle, imposing ziggurat, and the charming flying serpent it’s every bit as majestic as the name would imply.

Sacrifice to Quetzalcoatl

Continue reading

Carrot Top, Idol of millions

Idols are meant to inspire, but all too often they’re shown after centuries of wear and neglect, stripped down to the wood or stone that serves as their core. But Markus Rollbühler shows us a totem in full splendor in Jungle Idol. The bright colors are all sourced from uncommon parts like red paddle-ends and wakeboards, blue wrenches, and, yes, a halo of carrots. There’s also a splash of teal in the central disc and arms that makes me grin.

Jungle Idol

Markus notes that Emil Lidé came up with the technique for the palm trees – a gracious touch that speaks to how the LEGO community can inspire each other, even at the highest levels.

At the jungle temple of Coatepec, we witness the rise of Huitzilopochtli

Oh, man! I read about Mesoamerican mythology in college and I love the subject. So you can imagine how thrilled I was to see Luis Saladrigas present this stunning LEGO scene depicting the birth of the warrior-god Huitzilopochtli. He tells us that in a place called Coatepec (Serpent Hill) the goddess Coatlicue took a small number of white feathers and placed them in her bosom, from which she conceived Huitzilopochtli. Outraged by the nature of her mother’s pregnancy, Coyolxauhqui led four hundred of her brothers in an attack on Coatlicue. In the midst of this attack, Huitzilopochtli emerged from his mother’s womb in full battle armor and armed with his spear, Xiuhcoatl, destroyed his brothers and sisters, and rose to take his place as the Aztec God of War.

Rise of Huitzilopochtli

There’s plenty of amazing details to see here.

Click here to discover more.

A case of the cat mech zoomies

If you have a pet cat or if you’re like me and watch cat videos in your spare time you’ve definitely seen the well-documented phenomena of the “cat zoomies” – basically when indoor cats release pent-up energy and zoom around. Aido’s LEGO zoid-like cat mech also appears to be experiencing the zoomies and wow look at that powerful gait.

Full Power

Aido constructs this cat mech using a sleek black and red color scheme and overall the build makes use of a number of interesting elements including a black baseball diamond tile, an armor piece used above for the shoulder area – this looks like it is from a buildable figure model, and then the tail is interestingly constructed out of pneumatic T pieces clipped together using 1×1 modified plates. This robotic creature also is displayed running through a mystical patch of grass with bioluminescent-looking plants or creatures utilizing trans-clear green elements. Ultimately, this build is a very captivating and futuristic jungle scene and quite timely for late spring.

Full Power

First rule of being an adventurer: remember where you parked your off-roader

If you take a look at 1saac W. photostream, you’ll notice a lot of brick build cars. They specialize in building brick vehicles. Building LEGO vehicles is something you either hate or love to do. I am not a big fan of cars; therefore, I do not navigate towards building cars out of LEGO. However, I can really appreciate it when someone else manages to do it so well as 1saac W. does. They made a Toyota FJ40, and it looks just like the real deal. There are a lot of small parts incorporated in this build to get the level of detail just right. As far as I can tell, there have to be at least 7 minifigure hands used in the car. The actual number may, however, be higher. To display the lovely FJ40 1saac W. made a jungle-themed base. They even added a driver, and it is no one other than Johnny Thunder. And although we are used to seeing Johnny in vintage cars, The FJ40 suits him very well.

Adventure(r)s in the jungle

Time with a child is time well-spent

As a parent, I love spending time with my kids. Builder Felix Jaensch‘s “Orang-Utan with Child” creation is a beautiful tribute to those who play with LEGO with their kids.

Orang-Utan with Child

There is so much that I love about this. Let’s start with colors: it’s incredible how accurate the orangutan is, with the parent having orange marking around the mouth and the child showing lighter colors. I’m equally stunned at the layering Felix did in replicating fur with bricks. It looks so real!

Orang-Utan with Child

The tree itself is worth mentioning. Small color splotches help identify the tree as being in a weathered environment.

I hope to see more amazing builds like this from Felix this year!

A cozy temple tucked into a jungle cave

I’m often reminded that good landscaping can really make or break LEGO scenes or buildings. When builders like Jake Hansen build their structure right into the landscape through – chef’s kiss – words are hard to describe how good it can look. Jake is pretty masterful at LEGO landscaping, and his new pieces never cease to amaze me. The composition of slopes gives the perfect look of natural stone. The natural curves of the landscape perfectly nestle the structures of this hidden jungle temple and the smooth spring water it surrounds. A couple features I’d like to point out are the curving staircase, brilliantly constructed out of flags, and the table made from a brown witch king’s crown. Does anyone else wish this was a real place we could go and explore?

Jungle Temple