Tag Archives: Underwater

Go under the sea with the Royal Navy Octonaut

The year is 1859, and the British Navy is looking for Atlantis! Builder Paddy Bricksplitter has captured this historic moment of discovery in a detail-rich LEGO scene. Based on the columns and statue, our diver may have indeed found Atlantis. Let’s hope he’s also enjoying the rest of the view while he’s down there.

Royal Navy Octonaut

The Octonaut delivers a solid steampunk aesthetic without resorting to unnecessary embellishments. The tubing along the suit’s arms suggests a very real-world pneumatic solution for grip-strength at the ocean floor. Providing a nice contrast to the gold and brown, black rubber tires do double duty as weights and gaskets.

As cool as the diver is, the real highlight of this build for me is the innovative part usage on the sea floor. Not content with just the LEGO-standard fish and crab, Paddy has brought in Friends Accessories, Technic gears, a street-sweeper brush, and at least three types of minifigure hair. LEGO food items also feature prominently, with cupcakes galore, upward pointing carrots and lime ice cream scoops. And just look at that jellyfish!

Dive deep with the return of Aquazone

LEGO fan Tim Goddard is perhaps best known for his space-themed builds, such as this microscale space station we shared in February. Building off of his intergalactic experience, Tim is now diving below the seas to revisit the classic mid-1990s Aquazone theme. The centerpiece here is a large submersible, cleverly designed to look like a lobster. Instead of building the sub in lobster red, Tim went with the iconic yellow, black, and neon orange livery of the Aquanauts. By combining a mix of period-correct parts and more modern elements, Tim has created a submarine that feels both modern and true to the original source material. Meanwhile, an adorable fishy “drone” makes for a fine finishing touch.

Aquazone is back :)

Ogel will mind control you to like this dragonfish!

With Ogel’s mind-controlled army growing by the day, Alpha Team’s chances are looking more and more slim. To make matters worse, Rockmonster 2000 has sided with Ogel to provide him with a mutant dragonfish! Armed with harpoons and an awesomely dated early 2000s slick design, there is nothing that can stop their evil plan to take over the world!

Ogel Deep-Sea Patrol

The build is actually an entry for a Bionicle building competition–as if there were not enough early 2000s style in this creation already–which you can see if you look closely at the parts used. The current round of the competition asks for contestants to build a Bionicle creation capturing a particular theme, and Rockmonster 2000 has done an incredible job with his, since there’s no mistaking the Alpha Team in this one. There are various Bionicle parts, like a kanohi mask, and constraction elements like large claws used across it, sprinkled with just enough System bricks to flow perfectly. Alpha Team is a very nostalgic theme for me personally, but I think we can all agree that this creation is great even without its gloriously ridiculous background!

A new take on an ancient protector

While this creation by MemeLUG member Micah Beideman definitely looks amazing, I still have to ponder the practical benefit of a fence underwater. All joking aside, this is indeed a pretty sweet re-imagining of a LEGO Atlantis set, Gateway of the Squid.

Gateway of the Squid

The base looks somewhat rushed or simple until you take a closer look at it, with some nice textured stone walls in the back and very well placed vegetation. The little temple and titular gateway are not bad either. The main focus of the build is the squid though. It is not the first time we have seen inverted tyres used as organic texture, and it is not the first time the builder used this technique either, but he still managed to sneak in a bit of a unique twist with the printed 4×4 domes as eyes. I am personally always wary of using inverted tyres, because their shape and texture is hard to match with other bricks. Micah did not seem to have such problems, as the tentacle elements and a wedge slope used as the tip of the squid’s conical body flow very well with the tyres.