Tag Archives: Jake Hansen

A very smooth Halloween cottage

Okay Halloween might be over but that is no reason not to post an amazing LEGO Halloween themed build. This creation by Jake Hansen sure is something else. It is completely studless (not counting the studs on the foliage). This makes this creation almost look like it is not made out of LEGO bricks. Not building on a base but placing each element loose on paper also helps. Jake uses some interesting techniques. There are treasure chest lids hidden in the tree trunks. The best part has to be that cute fence and the balcony made with umbrellas. There is a stash of pumpkins next to the house. If you look closely you’ll spot that the ones in the back are not orange but red. This creates more depth as they look like there’s a shadow cast upon them because they are further away. Very clever. Another clever technique has to be the tombstone made out of a 2×2 round tile with hole and bar holders with clips attached to the back of the round plate. The effect is amazing!

The Crooked Cottage

A celebration of the humble LEGO frog

When I first joined the online LEGO community about 20 years ago, I had to choose an avatar to represent myself online. I decided to draw the LEGO frog in MS Paint and use it as my avatar. The frog piece was released in the year 2000. Over the years some LEGO parts get redesigned. It is however my honest opinion that there is no way to improve the iconic little frog. For its time it is very detailed and still very cute. Four amazing builders decided to celebrate the piece and I could not pass it up the chance to take a closer look at them.

Roanoke Handybuck’s frog is currently visiting the Swamp with a lovely dock featuring some paint brushes and a beautiful architectural sculpture using red parrots.

Fred's Adventures: The Swamp

Read on to see the rest of the models

It’s a Viking life for me

If you’re anything like me, you’ve been playing so much Valheim for the past few months that you’re going around muttering things like “the bees are happy” in your sleep. So naturally, when I saw this LEGO longhouse by Jake Hansen, I immediately thought of the game. Jake doesn’t mention that this was built with Valheim in mind, but it’s a beautifully simple Norse scene regardless. There are lots of great details but I think the best one here might be the wooden doors with handles made of bucket handles.

In space, no one can hear babies cry

This LEGO spaceship creation from Jake Hansen is another entry in the Iron Builder Contest, this time having to use the Crane Grab Jaw LEGO piece. The piece is used well as reclining seats on the spaceship bridge, which is populated by four babies. The black hoses are a nice touch, reminding me of the early LEGO space sets, and the choice of orange and blue accents lighten the scene up without overpowering it. What appears to be a flux capacitor on the left side of the console is a nice touch. I’m curious what the mouse on the lower right is up to; maybe it’s cutting through the power coupling?

Baby Bridge

Somewhere under the sea, somewhere waiting for me

I’m thinking of adorning my home with aquarium decor even though I don’t have any fish. I mean, think about it; tikis, skulls, mermaids, pirate ships. It’s pretty much the decor I already have minus the DayGlo paint. Or better yet, I can move all my stuff into this awesome LEGO Coral Castle by Jake Hansen. With bright coral, various lifeforms, and seaweed made of flex tubes there is a lot to love here. But my favorite detail is the fish made from beehives. I mean, come on, that’s just brilliant! Jake is competing in Iron Builder and, as brilliant as the beehive fish are, that is not even the seed part. This one is. He tells us twenty-four were used in this undersea diorama. This Iron Builder competition is just firing up so I get a feeling we’ll be seeing plenty more great builds from Jake soon.

The Coral Castle

This is one dino-mite creation!

Jake Hansen’s LEGO dinosaur reminds me of the rubber dino toys I used to own as a kid. They were bright in colour and most of them looked quite friendly. Except for the meat-eaters. They looked really serious but that was mostly due to the sharp teeth. Then Jurassic Park came along and all of a sudden most dinosaurs were earth-toned. They also made the velociraptors quite a lot bigger but that’s a story for another day. This Stegosaurus by Jake is colorful and really friendly looking. For the spine fins Jake used the crane grab jaw which looks splendid from this angle. I am curious how it looks from the front. The half round tiles have been used as toenails which works perfectly. Last but not least there is a quite Jurassic part used in the foliage that is dinosaur-related. It is the dragon arms, which later were used by LEGO on dinosaurs as well.

Dinosaur

A cozy temple tucked into a jungle cave

I’m often reminded that good landscaping can really make or break LEGO scenes or buildings. When builders like Jake Hansen build their structure right into the landscape through – chef’s kiss – words are hard to describe how good it can look. Jake is pretty masterful at LEGO landscaping, and his new pieces never cease to amaze me. The composition of slopes gives the perfect look of natural stone. The natural curves of the landscape perfectly nestle the structures of this hidden jungle temple and the smooth spring water it surrounds. A couple features I’d like to point out are the curving staircase, brilliantly constructed out of flags, and the table made from a brown witch king’s crown. Does anyone else wish this was a real place we could go and explore?

Jungle Temple

This Tiki Shaman reminds me of the monster of Frankenstein

Builder Jake Hansen shows us you can make body parts out of body parts. Let’s look for all the body parts. The headdress uses hands and arms to represent tree branches. The eye sockets are made using LEGO minifigure torsos, and the same goes for the skulls around the Shaman’s belt. In fact, those look absolutely brilliant in their simplicity. But the absolute cutest has to be the minifigure legs used as toes–an absolute winner to me. The use of colour in this creation is also gorgeous, especially when it comes to the contrast between the vibrant necklace and headdress and the more muted grey of the figure.

Tiki Shaman

We’re late for the Christmas party, but still...

Are we late for the Christmas party? I imagine building toys is an all-year job and while many of us have already packed away our Christmas lights and decorations, Jake Hansen graces us with a late Christmas hurrah. When the LEGO build techniques are this good, it doesn’t matter what the calendar says, really. I mean, just look at that crooked door and those slightly askew windows and chimney. That is no easy feat in LEGO! The colors and thick snow are all holiday perfection. Jake seems to make awesome build techniques his regular thing. This makes me want to get festive all over again and try that expired egg nog in the back of the fridge. What’s the worst that can happen?

The Workshop

Besides, we could all use some bonus Christmas cheer this week, right?

Something to do before you croak

In these dark times, I’m all about seeking out wisdom to brighten the world. Jake Hansen has presented us with an interesting option: The Frog Council. Perched atop graceful columns, these three wise amphibians invite the viewer to ask questions. Questions like “How did Jake come up with the idea of using baseball caps for egg cups?” Or maybe “Are those minifigure hands adding details to LEGO vines?” Oh sure, you could ask them something important like “How can we improve the world?” Or even “Why did LEGO get rid of the classic grey color?” But, c’mon. They’re frogs. There’s probably an upper limit to what they’re willing to share.

Where did these frogs gain their secret wisdom? Maybe it was from perusing our frog archives. But probably not.

A visual feast for a weary traveller

This colorful creation by Jake Hansen (Mountain Hobbit) jumped right out at me with the inviting use of colors that spellbind and luring me to a place where it’s mystical that I almost want to drive right into the canvas of LEGO bricks of which it’s sculpted with. The imagery is vertically split into three: the cool flowing blue of the waterfall streaming, the dark orange earth that paves the path to the hidden abode, and the muted green of the grass work in a perfect combination of something that seemed like it spun off an artist’s color wheel. The equally bright and random colors mushrooms fitted with various sizes of technic gears in tan bring the magical land to life.

Preston the Potion Master

It takes a village to make a village

I’ve recently started being interested in the idea of collaborative LEGO builds. Everyone does their part and they all come together to create an amazing piece of art. Such is the case with The Village of Thornefeld a terrific medieval village collaboration from Cole Blood, Timothy Shortell, Grant Davis, Eli Willsea, James Libby and Jake Hansen.

I had the pleasure of seeing this model in person at Bricks Cascade. Photographs can never quite capture the grandness of these large creations, but it was joy to see up close. What’s incredible about this build, besides it’s huge size and masterful execution, is the cohesiveness of the whole thing. Each builder worked within a tight color scheme and used matching rock styles to make all the sections mesh seamlessly. I love the way the ground slopes slowly upward, creating a wonderful rolling landscape and various levels. This is great territory for storytelling which each builder does nicely, creating a bustling village that’s full of life.

The Village of Thornefeld; A Collaborative Project