Posts by Chris Roberts

The future of freight

We might be facing shipping delays here but Stijn van der Laan shows us what the future of high class shipping can look like. This LEGO interplanetary freighter is absolutely stunning and the modular cargo load pairs perfectly. The simple white and grey colors with orange highlights contrasts nicely with the bright cargo and worker vessel. The subtle shaping adds some great texture and depth to the fairly simple overall shaping of the freighter. This is an absolute masterclass of microspace.

Interplanetary freighter

Click here for more details on the cargo!

21st century man

Just on the border of your waking mind, there lies another time, where darkness and light are one. This LEGO computer figure by Sandro Quattrini fits right into 1981 sci-fi. He’s probably got an IQ of 1001. This build is so full of great techniques and part usages and the poses it’s capable of achieving are wonderful! Some of the more interesting techniques used are the handcuffs used to replicate laces on the boots and the dots line bracelet used here as a belt. The star of the show would have to be the amazing zippered jacket using an ice skate as the zipper pull and roller skates for each side. The classic-styled computer head is phenomenal and really provides a ton of character and life to this build.

21st Century Man

Check out more facial expressions and poses below!

God Save the Queen – A Night at the Opera

Is this the real life? Or is this just fantasy? Nick Jensen brings us a fantastic LEGO album cover for Queen’s A Night at the Opera. This album is in Good Company with the other Queen builds Nick has done in the past and would make Freddie proud! The flex tubing script makes me feel like dancing in the rain. The details achieved in such a small space is superb. Open your eyes, look up to the skies and see the detail on the great lions, fiery crab, and majestic swan as the centerpiece here. I can honestly say that this album is the Love of My Life and Nick, I think You’re My Best Friend. You can find me Lazing on a Sunday Afternoon listening to Death on Two Legs now! Any way the wind blows…

LEGO Queen — A Night At The Opera

Medieval technical masterpiece

What would have happened if a medieval city grew as dense as modern cities? Ralf Langer builds us a picture of what it might have been like with this set of wonderful LEGO medieval buildings. Now I will confess up front that I’m not much of a medieval buff so I’m sure I would butcher any attempt to discuss the historical accuracy of these buildings. That said, what I do know is building techniques. And this is full of them! One of my favorites is the use of brown tread links to create the wooden supports slotting in between the curved white slopes of the walls. The rock work on the lower walls in superb as well, Ralf does a great job creating fairly random structure that gives great depth. Great stuff here, and it’s worth checking this out in greater detail!

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Bending time and space!

This LEGO spaceship is bending space itself! Or maybe that is just the brick bending technique that David Roberts used on this fantastic curvy racer. These massive engines look great with their colorful markings and smooth shaping. Brick bending is a difficult technique to work with at such a small scale and David pulled it off beautifully. I can imagine an entire racing series with this catamaran-styled ship full of high-speed action and incredible maneuverability. Always nice to see an uncommon technique used to great effect! If you want to check out what else can be achieved with brick bending take a look at the creations of Jeff Sanders, the brick bending specialist.

Skimmer 3

Welcome back to the 60’s

Don’t block the TV my show’s about to start! Cecilie Fritzvold brings us this wonderful LEGO living room set straight out of the 1960’s. This would be amazing on its own but what makes it even more special is that it’s a direct recreation of the 1965 LEGO set 022-2 Doll Furniture. Even the table lamp, floor lamp, and flower pot jumped from the original set to this remastered version! The composition is simple yet cozy. Makes me want to relax and laugh along to a new episode of The Carol Burnett Show! You know, when missing it meant it was lost forever? I love the added touch of the vintage camera-style photo to really solidify the era in question.

60s furniture

Speeding through the desert

This high speed LEGO speeder bike by Charlie screams fast! Bright red and sleek, the bike stands out from the rocky desert landscape below. Not that you would be able to see the landscape going at these speeds! While it doesn’t use a lot of parts, they are all well-chosen and flow together nicely. I especially like the use of the white rubber bands as pin striping while also acting as structure. The rocky ground below is also a wonderful combination of brick-built chunks and loose parts which give a very organic feel and accentuates the bike well. I’m always a fan of terrain to complete and build and this does a great job!

The RED Snake II

Checkpoint reached! Game saved.

The best feeling after finally beating that tough level is to bask in the peaceful tranquility of the save location. Tom Loftus recreates this feeling with this wonderful LEGO game checkpoint. Some great techniques going on here — the fluffy floating clouds and the little three wheeled companion rover are superb. The gems scattered around are a great touch and I admire the dedication it must have taken to balance all of those around the build. The inspiration for this build is a brand new 5×5 curved plate, used here upside down around the central tower.

Checkpoint

Check out more interesting uses of this new part from our friends over at New Elementary. Now onto the next challenge!

Massive brick with a sick secret!

Large-scale LEGO bricks have been done many times in the past but this gigantic brick by Tommy Frost takes it to a whole new height. At a 22x scale, Tommy was able to achieve a high level of detail, going as far as adding the raised LEGO logo on the top stud and even the small slit below the side stud. This particular brick is referred to as a headlight brick (or sometimes Erling brick) and is one of the earliest elements that enables sideways building, called SNOT (studs not on top) building. A wonderful graffiti-style art on the side gives a hint as to the secret that this large brick holds.

Removing the LEGO logo on top reveals that this SNOT brick doubles as a tissue box! A wonderful play on words and a fantastic model! Check out more views below.
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Discovery in the crystal caves

LEGO caves have been done before but not quite like this one from Jake Hansen. His use of various blues and greens for the water is great! All the lovely angles of the various rock columns give this a very interesting organic feel. The pops of color with the red and pink crystal formations liven up the darkness of the cave. You might even spot some pink frogs lurking in the shadows! Jake went all out using the red windscreen Iron Builder seed part for this last build of the round.

The Crystal Caves

Don’t steal this bunny’s eggs

Happy Easter! Jake Hansen brings us this fantastic LEGO Easter Bunny who’s a little more protective of his eggs than usual. This was built for the current Iron Builder round with the seed part being the red cockpit piece used here in the ears. Jake brings out a lot of character, proving that complicated building techniques are not needed to create a great story! That doesn’t mean there isn’t anything interesting going on here though. Check out the use of LEGO rubber bands as the stripping on the eggs and the black minifigure wands for whiskers! I especially love the use of the pink heart tile on the nose. Great composition and superb use of colors round out this great build!

Easter Bunny

That is one suave bird!

Right out of 1940’s Disney animation comes this LEGO rendition of José Carioca by Koen Zwanenburg. This dapper parrot looks wonderful in brick form and is full of great part uses! The hands use minifigure legs as fingers, elbows, and shoulders. Green cloud plates make up part of the fluffy feathers on his legs. My personal favorites include the stack of shell parts as the lower part of his beak and the white snake part used as wafting smoke! His trusty top hat and umbrella are faithfully recreated here as well!

José Carioca