Tag Archives: Speeder

Fabulous Fabulandspeeder

I wish this was an actual LEGO set. I would forgive LEGO for making Luke’s Landspeeder as often as a Spider-Man movie gets shoved down our throats. This makes me wish that LEGO brought back its old Fabuland theme, instead of my own favourite Bionicle. And so does Fabuland super-fan Stewart Lamb Cromar.

‘Fabulandspeeder’ (1/4)

Fabuland was a theme in the late 70s into the 80s, which started as a step between DUPLO and classic LEGO. It released a year after the first modern minifigure, as well as the first space and castle sets. The goal was to build a universe of friendly, funny, animal-headed characters that appeal to both boys and girls. The design of the sets were simplified and consisted of mostly primary colours – red, yellow, and blue.

‘Fabulandspeeder’ (2/4)

Similarly, Stu built his Fabulandspeeder with the default “Fabuland colour scheme” but with all the detailed goodness that Star Wars builds offer. He also used genuine Fabuland parts, including a loose house door he procured second-hand, as the original piece is built into a big panel.

Check out some more Fabuland-themed builds here!

The chase is on! It’s speeder bike versus speeder bike!

What’s better than one speeder bike? Two speeder bikes so that they can race against each other! -Disty- built a dynamic duo of hovering bikes with distinct styles and colours to match their pilots. They may be vengeful arch-enemies hellbent on destroying each other or just racing rivals here for the thrill of the chase. With the opposing styles and colour schemes, these two speeder bikes remind me of the old Technic battle bots from the late 90s.

Shinrai Technologies 'Orca' - Sport Bike

The tropical-themed Shinrai Technologies ‘Orca’ is a green mean speed machine piloted by a surfer dude. I love its lime green paint job that compliments azure waters and bright sands it flies above. Disty uses very clever parts usage with Hero Factory armour plates and robot minifigure legs as the secondary booster engines. I particularly like the usage of the transparent blue Bionicle eye/brain stalk as the headlight. It reminds me of the wheels of Legends of Chima Speedorz and even some Roboriders.

Rascal Motors 'DBL 790' - Urban Cruiser

The black and red Rascal Motors ‘DBL 790’ rules the night with furious speed. Despite the large Hero Factory spikes jutting out at all angles, this speeder bike retains aerodynamics to brave even the most congested cyberpunk air traffic. I love its angled look and greebly details; it looks like some creepy-crawly monster of the dark.

Over the water and past the finish line

Thirsty? Get a drink from this racer’s wake! Builder aido k created this fantastic racer to fly across the sea and leave his competitors behind.
Sport Racing

I’m enjoying looking at this racer as much as the driver is flying it! With so few parts, aido k managed to pull off a ton of angles and little details. I love the round pieces on the bottom that seem to be what is keeping the racer alight. But the coolest detail would have to be the way the fin is dipping into the water just enough to cause a bit of spray.

I’d jump at the chance to see this racer from a few other angles as well. Here’s to hoping we do!

A race to the Moon? Challenge accepted.

Noblebun is one of the best sci-fi LEGO builders out there, proving that title with his newest creation, the V-X Vera.

V-X Vera

“Roaring into the spaceport was the most beautiful ship I’ve ever seen in all my days. With a lean white bow and gleaming engines, she settled down into my docking bay. I thought I was lucky to just catch a glimpse of her, but now she could be mine to care for,” — Rhys Wheelright, chief of maintenance, Colony One.
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Super fast speeder zips on by

Do you feel a need for speed? Are your competitors feeling hungry? Fix that speed craving and make your rivals eat your dust as you speed along in Oscar Cederwall‘s LEGO skitter vig.
Skitter Vig

Look at this speeder zip through the desert! It’s always great to see what sort of science fiction vehicles can be created, and this is no different. Using large blue pieces from buildable action figures was a clever idea, as was the decision to do an open cockpit. We’re able to see the figure, giving us a sense of scale with the dust clouds. Which, by the way, is probably my favorite part of this whole creation. I’m seeing how fast the driver is going and what kind of environment he’s in. This definitely shows Oscar’s talent!

Do you feel lucky? Well, do you, cyberpunk?

Some people like horror movies, because they like being terrified by monsters and gore. I don’t. I hate horror movies, in fact. Instead, I go in for cyberpunk, because I like being scared by a desolate tech-heavy future. Bleak metal buildings, an utter dearth of plant life, and gritty scrappers with doctorates in electrical, aerospace, and mechanical engineering (how else could you keep such sophisticated tech running, kitbashing decrepit robots and speeders on the fly, right?), are all the things that give me nightmares. And I love it. This LEGO scene by CRCT Productions hits that perfect cyberpunk sweet spot, with the immersive scene, the optimal balance between greebled and smooth surfaces, and the dim light with brightly glowing signs.

LEGO Cyberpunk Industrial Zone

I love the pipes on the left and the roller coaster track on the right, and that little orange-lit shop down the street gives the scene so much added depth and realism. The builder resisted the temptation to overpopulate the street, and instead carefully chose a few well-placed soldiers to give a dreary, not-quite-but-almost deserted life to the scene. Ok. Now that I’ve looked at this for a bit, I need to get outside for a walk in the park or read one of my many leather-bound books to get that future of technological horrors out of my mind.

Do you like this kind of stuff too? Then check out the cyberpunk archives of TBB!

Why buy a new speeder when you can build one?

Does your speeder jerk when accelerating? Or maybe you started noticing that ticking noise coming from the engines after the oil change? I think you should stop by Alexander Blais garage. It’s not the fanciest one, and they might not be accepting credits, but these guys know their trade. Look at all the crates and boxes lying around; some say there is no such spare part they don’t have here in the garage. And forget about silly service droids. You don’t want to trust your lovely speeder to a soulless machine, do you?

Speeder Garage

The rules of the race

In the non-LEGO “real” world, I work in innovation, developing ideas for new products, mostly in the world of drinks. Doing work like this, you come across multiple techniques for enhancing creativity and improving idea generation. In my experience, one of the most effective is the setting of constraints and rules around what you’re trying to do. Although it seems counterintuitive, the narrowing of possibility, the scaling-back of the intimidating blank canvas, gives more permission and opportunity for creativity. That’s where my recent Hover Car Racer models came from. In a bid to get past a bout of “builders’ block,” I set myself some constraints — a handful of key elements which would be common across the models, but beyond those, each racer could vary in design. The “rules” I set myself: bold color styling, a whiff of a muscle car, elements of asymmetry, and an enclosed cockpit. I’m really pleased with the variety which arose from sticking within these constraints and was pleasantly surprised at the creative flow of the building process…

LEGO hover car speeder

The next time you’re struggling through a bout of the creative block (regardless of your creative medium of choice), I’d recommend setting yourself some constraints. Give yourself an unreasonable time limit, drastically limit the materials you can use, or set size and/or color restrictions — paradoxically, you’ll find such limitations will set you free.

Once I had a few models, it seemed natural to expand the world of Hover Car Racing. I imagined a future where the drivers are rockstar celebrities, with wall-to-wall coverage of races on every channel. I love taking a model and presenting it in a way that implies a broader universe around it…

LEGO hover car racer speeder

They fly now? They fly now.

I don’t want to spoil much for you if you haven’t yet seen Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, but the main takeaway from this scene by flambo14 is that they fly now. When do spoilers become common knowledge? A brief internet search proves this can be a shifting and nebulous answer but the overall consensus is it’s frowned upon to spoil anything while said movie is still actively in theaters but should be fair game after that. For example; Darth Vader is Luke’s father, Bruce Willis was dead all along and the chick in The Crying Game is totally a dude. If these revelations spoiled anything for you then you fall into the “God help you” category and really should get out more. However, as to what flies now and why, we’re going to remain as vague as an Ikea instruction manual at least for a few more weeks.

LEGO - Pasaana Speeder Chase "They fly now"

You can make yours fly now with this set. Here is our review on the matter.

LEGO Star Wars 75250 Pasaana Speeder Chase from The Rise of Skywalker [Review]

Star Wars Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker hits theaters in almost exactly a month, but Star Wars fans have been treated to scenes from the movie in several teasers and trailers over the past year, including a speeder chase scene featuring our Resistance heroes aboard a vehicle that look like the post-apocalyptic offspring of the desert skiffs in Return of the Jedi and Enfys Nest’s Cloud Rider swoop-bikes from Solo. 75250 Pasaana Speeder Chase is the smallest LEGO Star Wars set released so far to support the upcoming movie, at 373 pieces with three minifigs and one droid.

The set was released at the beginning of October so is available now ($39.99 US | $49.99 CAN | £44.99 UK | currently 20% off from both Amazon.com and Target).

Read our full review of LEGO Star Wars 75250 Pasaana Speeder Chase from The Rise of Skywalker

It’s not faster than you need, it’s just faster than you’re used to

The Muscle Car of the Future — that’s how Blake Foster describes his latest LEGO creation. It’s a perfect fit for this beefy beast of a speeder. This thing looks like it’s bursting with engine power, and along with the lovely colour blocking, it’s bristling with functional-looking greebles. Check out the fins on those intakes up front, and the wonderful curved piping which creates a common design element across both the front and back sections visually tying the whole model together.

Centauri Industries Crater Maker 5000

Even better, Blake’s speeder appears to run on fuel provided by everyone’s favourite mega-corporation, Octan…

Crater Maker 5000 - Refueling Stop

Effortlessly graceful speederbike

A good LEGO speederbike looks futuristic and “swooshable”, but the very best also carry with them a functional design — a sense of realism allowing you to suspend disbelief in the same way the bike suspends the normal rules of gravity. This beautiful model by GoIPlaysWithLego certainly looks the part, with hints of a Tron-style future in its colour scheme and curves, but it also has that elusive realistic look. The trans-blue steering fins at the front, the whips used as power cables, the shaped panelling around the cockpit seat — all add to the functional feel. And as for that black spike element underneath — I’ve no idea what it does, but I don’t doubt that without it this bike would be unable to fly.

LEGO Speeder

On a more prosaic note, the model’s stand continues the impressive design, enhancing the presentation without distracting attention from the central subject.