About Elspeth De Montes

Elspeth De Montes is Scottish but lives in North Yorkshire with her partner and twins. She is a LEGO Builder not a collector of sets, which in theory should make the hobby less expensive (ahem!) but monochrome collections can be pricey.   You can see more of Elspeth's work on her blog or website and Flickr.   Elspeth is also a bike lover; mountain bike, fixie, road bike, tri-bike (n+1=number of bikes I need).

Posts by Elspeth De Montes

Traditional Japanese machiya is beautifully simple

Machiya are traditional wooden townhouses found throughout Japan and typified in the historical capital of Kyoto. This LEGO version of a machiya by Dan Blom is a great example of a seemingly simple build that really looks the part. The key architectural details like the barred window, known as mushiko mado [literal translation is ‘insect cage window’] and the wooden lattice façade are accurately represented. These days most roofs are covered with clay tiles called kawara, and Dan has left the LEGO studs exposed to give the impression of neatly arranged, rough tiles.

hus japan C4

The addition of some extra little details such as the cart, the various items outside the front of the house and the ancient-looking tree complete the scene perfectly.

Step inside a typical Malaysian heritage house

Heritage houses are wonderful older styled buildings with a typical façade that can be found dotted around many locations in Malaysia. Vincent Kiew has created a beautiful LEGO heritage house complete with detailed interior. I love the façade with its wooden louvre shutters and architectural decorations above the arched windows. The use of a mix of white and older yellowed white bricks really adds to the ‘antiquated’ appearance. The same slightly worn down appearance is provided by the mix of colours in the main left hand side of the house with light grey, white and the odd sand green brick as an aesthetic colour scheme.

"01</p

Vincent has created a detailed interior for the house, complete with kitchen, living room, bedroom, study, toilet and more. The build is an accurate representation of a typical house and is structurally sound despite being made of LEGO.

17

It’s worthwhile taking a closer look at all the fantastic interior details that have been added. Most of the interior decorations and furniture are made of wood or stone with some lovely artistic details.

18

If you liked Vincent’s heritage house, you may also enjoy his LEGO recreation of Kuala Lumpur’s Chinatown that we featured last month.

Eco-friendly living in the green house

They say a house is not a home without a cat, but despite being a cat-lover I would say that a house is not a home without an awesome home gym and fully equipped kitchen. I would be very happy to move into this eco-friendly sustainable Green House by Swedish builder Sarah. Extending from the rock-face, this house makes full use of the sun’s power with solar panels and lots of windows for light. The central column has a nice colour combination to tone in with the surrounding natural environment.

Green Rock House MOC exterior V

See more of this green house after the jump

LEGO Slammington can never go rusty

One of the most famous rat rods is Rusty Slammington, the Supra-powered, rust coated, slammed BMW street rod. Unlike a hot rod, a rat rod will have a tarnished, unfinished look and is made to be driven rather than simply to be a pristine reproduction. This LEGO version of Rusty Slammington by Calin Bors is not adorned with decals and decoration, but instead manages to capture the unique shape and style of Rusty. The mixed palate of browns, black and dark orange is a perfect combination to represent the destroyed look.

Rusty Slammington

There’s no need to be careful going over a speed hump with Rusty; just go for speed and let the frame rails produce the some street fireworks.

LEGO on the fast track with a Nissan GT-R Nismo

With a £150,000 price tag, it’s clear the Nissan GT-R Nismo is not a car for driving to the supermarket and back quickly when you run out of milk. The fact that renowned LEGO car builder Firas Abu-Jaber built a LEGO version and said it was his favourite car, makes it even more apparent that this is a special vehicle. The name Nismo is just a contraction of Nissan Motorsport, and this supercar is all about speed, control, and performance on the track. Firas’ LEGO version is brilliantly accurate with some skilled building techniques used to get the shaping and the coloured components spot-on.

Nismo Nissan GTR 2017

See more of this super-fast LEGO supercar

A rare sighting is the big cat’s pyjamas for this colonel

The Colonel has found a real vantage point within this overgrown Meso-American watchtower as he manages to catch sight of the elusive jaguar. This build by Ayrlego uses a nice mix of LEGO flora to create a little jungle  scene — even the sprue from the three-leaf plant is utilised and becomes a vine winding its way through the watchtower’s window. The textures and colours used for the overgrown watchtower are perfect allowing the scene to be both aesthetically pleasing and true to nature.

Jaguar Tower

The jaguar is a rare animal but thanks to the new City Jungle theme,  the population of jaguars has increased. You can read more about this new animal in our review of 6061 City Jungle Exploration Site.

Rocketing up to a new home in the sky

There’s definitely a creepy feel to this microscale LEGO scene — it seems that a little extraterrestrial tourism has led to a sudden drop in the population, as if something untoward has left a rather full looking graveyard on the ground and a large ‘not of this world’ city in the sky. Kale Frost has left the exact history of events to our own imaginations, but the title “After the Martians Came” suggests a post-apocalyptic exodus from Earth. I love the use of the stud shooter trigger for the headstones in the graveyard, and Rocket Boy’s rocket outfit gives a nice retro 1960s film feel to the scene.

After the Martians Came

A closer look at the ground shows that a surprising number of parts have been utilised to make this microscale scene. The street lamp is cute and the damage to the streets is another sign that all is not well in town.

Graveyards and rockets

’32 Ford Deuce served in true vintage style

This classic hot rod, built by Andrea Lattanzio, doesn’t have a bright red or racing green paint job, but a rather more drab shade of tan. Officially known as Cordoba Tan, it was a colour used almost exclusively by Ford, and the actual vehicle depicted is a 1932 Ford Deuce 3 Window Coupé. The hot rod is awesome, but for me the background workshop with its vintage details draws the whole image together. I love the vintage Coca-Cola bottle vending machine, the palate with Esso oil spilling onto the floor, and the retro radio on the window sill.

'32 Ford Deuce 3 Window Coupé (a.k.a. the Takehito Yamato Coupé)

This particular Deuce was built in California and shipped to Japan where its new owner lives. Takehito Yamato contacted the Walden Speed Shop in Pomona, California, to order a traditional hot rod.  Andrea has also captured this hot rod’s details in LEGO as you can see from the broken-down view showing the red Chevy ZZ383 with aluminium heads in all its glory.

'32 Ford Deuce 3 Window Coupé (a.k.a. the Takehito Yamato Coupé)

Tips for Kids – Transformers: Cool Projects for Your LEGO Bricks [Review]

Joachim Klang and Alex Jones are a duo of builders well known within the LEGO community, and their creations have appeared on The Brothers Brick numerous times. Now they’ve got a new book to share some of their techniques: Tips for Kids – Transformers: Cool Projects for Your LEGO® Bricks. Over the past few months, we’ve already highlighted a few of the builds that the pair created for the book, but now we are able to review the book itself.

TBB Transformers Review

Title: Tips for Kids: Transformers: Cool Projects for your Lego Bricks
Publisher: Heel Verlag Gmbh (July 10, 2017)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 3958434959
ISBN-13: 978-3958434950
RRP: $19.95

Continue reading

Keep on truckin’ with a Peterbuilt 352 110 Cabover

If you find that the boot of your car (or trunk, for those across the pond) is not quite big enough to transport your LEGO collection, then this heavy hauler should do the trick. André Pinto has built a LEGO Peterbuilt 352 110 Cabover in its original paint scheme of blue and white with just enough glinting chrome to catch the eye of those truck admirers out there.

PETERBILT 352 110 CABOVER

André’s model might not use much fuel, but the cab can tip just like the real vehicle to show off the chassis and lots more chrome, especially those exhaust pipes.

PETERBILT 352 110 CABOVER

Do you hear the people sing? Les Misérables in LEGO

The barricade scene in Les Misérables — the musical based on the novel by French poet and novelist Victor Hugo — is a powerful mix of song and drama. Loosely based on the 1832 Paris uprising, idealistic revolutionary students set up a street barricade and fight government troops to the bitter end. W. Navarre has managed to capture this scene fantastically with the large central barricade and a detailed backdrop showing narrow Parisian streets. The barricade looks the part as a jumbled collection of brown coloured LEGO wheels, ladders, furniture, windows and bricks.

The War Between Four Walls

There’s a lot of detail to be found relating to the musical version of Les Misérables,  I particularly love details like the tear in the French flag, the lantern and the fatally wounded Gavroche.

Gavroche (The War Between Four Walls)

You can see more images of this build and the other Les Misérables-themed LEGO creations in his album on Flickr.

Ponies are cool, but LEGO ponies are about 20% cooler

If the rain clouds are still hovering overhead then it’s time to call the cavalry, otherwise known as Rainbow Dash. In the world of hit TV show My Little Pony this pugnacious pegasus maintains the weather and clears the skies of Ponyville. British builder Andrew Harvey used around 3700 LEGO bricks to capture Dash’s colourful likeness, even managing to give her a sense of movement in the process. This sculpture is cleverly made using a “studs out” technique for the head, body and wings – but those expressive eyes are my favourite part of this model.

LEGO Rainbow Dash

There’s also a view of Rainbow Dash’s swishing tail as she makes her way back to Ponyville to kick away a few rain clouds. And if you’re in the vicinity of Manchester, England this weekend you can even marvel at this model in person at the Bricktastic LEGO show.

LEGO Rainbow Dash