Tag Archives: Crane

The biggest LEGO Technic set ever: 42082 Rough Terrain Crane [Review]

The LEGO Technic fan community has always been as diverse as possible, consisting of kids building simple cars, teens assembling larger sets and adult fans creating incredibly complicated LEGO mechanisms. Designing a product that will be liked by an audience this broad sounds like a dreadful challenge, and one of the possible solutions is releasing a model bigger and heavier than any other set before. This way comes LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, a gigantic model of 4057 pieces retailing for $299.99. The new crane becomes the largest LEGO Technic set to ever hit store shelves, but this larger scale is not without some potential flaws…

Read our complete review of 42082 Rough Terrain Crane

LEGO Technic Fall 2018 sets revealed in New York, including the 42082 Rough Terrain Crane [News]

In conjunction with our in-person coverage of the LEGO Fall 2018 Preview event, we’re bringing you all the new product reveals in the LEGO Technic line, scheduled for release later this year. There are several fun sets coming up in this series, and we even got an up-close look at the new Volvo Concept Loader today.

See our complete coverage of the upcoming LEGO Technic sets

Functional LEGO Liebherr mobile crane will lift your bricks on high

Leibherr mobile cranes are like buses, two come along at once and you are not sure which to jump in. Thankfully we can admire both of YU KEE LIUs builds as these all-terrain mobile cranes are fantastic in both accuracy and build quality.  The first build depicts the Liebherr LTM 1350 mobile crane and the model is capable of extending, lifting items and moving them on its rotating axis.

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Yu Kee Liu has managed an impressive feat of engineering with his LEGO version as you can see from a view with the crane arm extended.

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Click to see an even larger LEGO version of a Liebherr mobile crane

Fully Functioning 1:24 scale LEGO Crane is over 24 ft tall and can lift a chair [Video]

The actual Liebherr LR11000 first went into operation on July 7, 2014. A mere 1,269 days later, Dawid Szmandra brings us a fully functioning LEGO build that’s not just ANY model, but one that’s at an astounding scale of 1:24, weighing in at 27 kg, uses 4 EV3 bricks, 9 motors, 7 light sensors and 1 touch sensor! The maximum height of this towering crane is 24 feet (7.5m)!

LEGO Liebherr LR 11000

And lest you think it’s all for show, this crane has some serious lifting capacity.

Click to see a video of this monster in action

Gorgeous 8-foot-tall LEGO mobile crane has complete working functions

Leibherr’s LTM 1090-4.1 mobile crane is an impressive piece of construction equipment with a top speed of 85km/h, a telescopic boom up to 50m, and a maximum load capacity of 90 tonnes. If that doesn’t impress you, then this scaled LEGO version of the mobile crane by Dirk Klijn should attract your attention. Dirk has spent 3 and a half years working on this 80cm long model that has 5 Sbrick‘s controlling 17 functions, including driving, working rear lights, indicators and reversing lights, boom and jib extension, power-lifting objects, steering and motion, as well as non-motorised functions such as full suspension, opening doors, and the manual folding jib.

Liebherr LTM 1090 4.1 - SarensLiebherr LTM 1090 4.1 - Sarens

On a model this big, there are plenty of details to pore over…

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Ready for Mammoth tasks with the Liebherr LTM 1350

It may be less than two weeks ago since I blogged a build by Maksymilian Majchrzak ( [MAKS] ), but it seems he very much likes the same sort of things I do and he builds them well. Case in point: his latest crane.

Liebherr LTM 1350-6.1(4)

For those of you who are crane geeks, this is a Liebherr LTM 1350-6.1 in the colours of Mammoet (Mammoth) — a famous company from the Netherlands that specialises in heavy lifting and heavy haulage. This behemoth is built to my favourite scale of 1/22, which makes it roughly 100 studs long in road-going configuration.

Liebherr LTM 1350-6.1 (2)

The model is very detailed and has numerous working features such as steering, a telescopic boom that can be raised and lowered (which does involve inserting an extra part to lengthen the hydraulic ram), side supports that extend and retract, and he has included a brick-built figure. If there were a checklist of things I like, he has ticked almost all of the boxes.

This crane is here to lighten your Monday

Once you’ve flicked through Arjan Oude Kotte’s photo stream, be sure: You’ve seen the best of brick-built vessels. But every ship needs a harbor to tie up in, and where there’s a harbor, there are huge dock cranes. Arjan has just finished one, and this is not an ordinary crane. This one is a beautiful copy of a vintage iron giant from the 1900s. It is extremely realistic, including an amazing lighting system, which looks utterly charming.

vintage harbour crane

Forestry Crane Truck

Toronto got hit pretty bad last year with an ice storm and destroyed a lot of Toronto’s tree cover, which took weeks to clean up all the poor trees. The only cool part was I got to see a lot of the Toronto Forestry trucks rolling around, which Isaac Mazer (Ricecracker.) was able to recreate with stunning accuracy:

Crane Truck

This Freightliner 108SD truck is operated by the City of Toronto’s Department of Forestry, and Isaac has been able to recreate the truck’s distinctive hood – in minifig scale – by shaping an official LEGO eraser!

This truck also has a functional truck bed to dump out trees and a knuckle-boom crane to pick up trees:
Crane Truck

Friday Night Fights (Round 32)

We’re reaching for the skies tonight, with two models that on the one hand are very similar, but on the other could hardly be more different. Both represent a Liebherr LTM 11200 9.1, which is currently the world’s largest mobile crane.

In the red corner we find the heavyweight contestant: a 1/15.5-scale model by Huib van der Hart (liftingbricks). I blogged this last year, when it was still a work in progress. Its size imposed daunting technical challenges and, at the time, it couldn’t yet be erected. Now it can, however, and it is so big it’s intimidating.

Project Lego liebherr ltm 11200 9.1

In the blue corner, we find a minifig scale version by Maksymilian Majchrzak (MAKS). This is his largest model to date and at 2 kg and with a height of 70 cm, when fully extended, it’s not exactly tiny. In this competition, however, it’s the bantamweight. Despite its much smaller scale though, it looks very much like the real deal, is highly detailed and has many working functions.

Liebherr LTM 11200-9.1 (3)

In last week’s dragontastic installment, Stormbringer’s Skrill Showdown narrowly beat Jonas’ Smaug the Stupendous, with a final score of 8 to 7. It’s up to you this week, dear reader, to decide whether size matters.

“It’s the Orange Blossom Special Bringin’ my baby back”

We can’t let a weekend slip by without something for our valued Train-heads, the progenitors of our shared hobby. To that end, Poland’s Maciej Drwięga would like to share his latest effort with you the very orange “PKP WM15A heavy rail truck“, a staple of the Polish rail system. Not only is the design pleasing to the eye, it has some nice play features as well like moving crane and a tilting bed. The builder credits Mrzumbi’s 2006 version for inspiring this build.

PKP WM15A

PKP WM15A

Of Helicopters and Hooligans

In January of this year we featured Ryan McNaught’s (TheBrickMan) king of helicopters, the Erickson Air-Crane Elvis. As many of you have no doubt read by now, Elvis was on public display at Cairns Central shopping center in northern Queensland, Australia when the unthinkable happened: a group of misguided “youths” pushed mighty Elvis to the ground with predictable results.

LEGO Vandalism

We’ve all seen accidental damage to models at conventions before, most often caused by enthusiastic butter-fingered youngsters, gawking public day attendees leaning too far over the ropes or rotund builders trying to squeeze between tables…but nothing like this…nothing so deliberate. Fortunately the flight-recorder survived the crash and the authorities are hard at work piecing together the final seconds of Elvis’s life.

LEGO Black Box Flight Recorder

TBB reached out to Ryan for a comment and found him in remarkably good spirits considering the scope of this brick-tragedy and very much willing to speak about it. Because of the ongoing criminal trial taking place with 2 youths charged over the death of Elvis, Ryan cannot get into the specifics of the incident.

“I was asleep in bed when the phone rang, you always know when it rings and its late that its bad, and well it was, I drove about 40 minutes into the centre where it was on display and there it was just as pictured (see my Flickr) to see hundreds of hours worth of work ruined is pretty surreal, and something I’ve never experienced before.

To pull down and destroy your own MOC can be very satisfying, I’ll never forget the Brickvention of 2009 where by 9 foot Eiffel tower was brought down at the end of the show Team America World Police style!

Needless to say I had to pack it up that night after the police came and did their thing, and got back to bed at about 2am. The next morning the media were swarming, but of course nothing to see, so that was fun watching the media look like idiots.

Anyway I was up there building a giant LEGO rainforest where people came along built a bit of the rainforest and added it to the display, I felt it was really important to keep that going so that people could still have fun and enjoy it. As people either asked where the chopper was, or came to sympathize it kind of hit home, the usual anger then sadness kicked in, but that was all fairly temporary, because to be honest its LEGO right? anything can be rebuilt, so whilst it sucks to lose such a big model, its not like its a 2,000 year old Ming vase.

So I’m kind of circumspect about it, and a bit relaxed about it now (my wife holds the anger and frustration for me!) and to be honest, when I rebuild/repair it (who knows when I can find the time) it will be just as cool as what it was, and its got a hell of a cool story behind it.

Plus doesn’t rebuilding it stick it up the nose of those who ruined it? To me LEGO has this thing where its cool to return back to its original form and then become something else, so i guess this is kind of like that.”

I think it does stick it up their collective nose Ryan, but for the violent American inside me…it isn’t quite enough. It used to be the most you had to worry about while displaying your model at a convention was the occasional petty theft or jackassy question, but this is a whole new ballgame. Stay tuned to TBB for a follow up on the court case.

MAKS’ Liebherr crane is a lot smaller than you may think

This is probably not a sentence you read every day, but I happen to have a weak spot for well-built cranes. It’s the reason why I absolutely love the minifig-scale Liebherr 1050-3 mobile crane built by Polish builder Maksymilian Majchrzak (MAKS).

Liebherr LTM 1050-3.1(2)

I built one of these myself more than a year ago, on a larger scale, and consequently am very familiar with the shape and the details. We have also previously blogged a Liebherr 1050 built by Makorol, who also happens to be from Poland (what do they put in the water there?). This model, which was remote controlled with Power Functions, was even larger than mine.
What is particularly impressive about the crane built by MAKS is that, despite being only 8 studs wide, it really isn’t a lot less detailed than either of the larger models. In fact, it looks just like the photographs of die-cast models I used as an inspiration.