Tag Archives: Brickfilm

A neat historical flick made from the brick: “Chicago Pile-1: A Brick History” [Video]

Recently, Dave Pickett from the YouTube channel Brick 101 created a video for the Argonne National Laboratory called “Chicago Pile-1: A Brick History”. The final product turned out great. Coming in at 2 minutes and 51 seconds, the animation is full of all sorts of thoughtful touches. From the composition of the scenes to the LEGO buildings found within, this is absolutely the work of a maestro.

But how exactly did he make it? David’s behind the scenes video gives some insight.

Watch the behind-the-scenes video and learn more about how LEGO stop-motion movies are made

Arcade Robot Breakdance Battle features amazing LEGO animation [Video]

YouTube content creator BreaksBricks recently put out a short LEGO animation in the form of LEGO Arcade Robot Breakdance Battle!. I’m going to skip over the cute characters, good music and great builds, because the animation alone is worth talking about. I haven’t seen animated LEGO this smooth since The Lego Movie. Give it a watch:

Amazing LEGO Stop-motion Ghostbusters [Video]

Paul Hollingsworth and the fine folks at Digital Wizards have done it again, bringing us a stop-motion LEGO version of Ghostbusters. This 4:30 minute brickfilm is a labor of love, requiring over 2,000 hours of time for animation, building, lighting, compositing and composing the final product! The opening shot alone, according to the animators, took 12 hours to set up and 6 hours to animate.

All of your favorites make cameos to help the fabulous four battle the terrible (and terribly adorable!) Stay Puft Marshmallow man!

Enjoy!

A Fixed System: A LEGO film that makes you think

We don’t often feature brick films on Brothers Brick; partly because that’s not where our interests lie, and partly because it’s a lot more time consuming to discover new content. Sometimes though, a brick film jumps out as worthwhile. Such is the case with A Fixed System by Aaron Fisher.

We find here the tale of an Everyman awash in a rote life as a brick factory worker, who would have fit right in with Emmett during the beginning of The LEGO Movie. I won’t spoil what happens when he decides to look for more in life, but I will say it provides an interesting subject upon which to muse. And like much good art, it provides a platform upon which the viewer’s own beliefs and worldview are highlighted and questioned.

The animation is strong in this 10-minute movie (a frequent failing of brick films) and the facial expressions and soundtrack tell the story excellently in this silent film.