Tag Archives: James Bond

LEGO James Bond Aston Martin DB5 set designer reveals what piece set the scale for the super spy car [Video]

The newest LEGO Creator vehicle, the 10262 James Bond Aston Martin DB5, was revealed in London today with surprise instant availability worldwide. The iconic car is packed with hidden features, gadgets and includes an ingenious way of making the LEGO car’s doors open and close like a real car.

We learned an interesting fact from the designer video included below, that scale of the vehicles in the Creator Expert line is determined by the size of the LEGO wheel that best fits the car. LEGO senior set designer Mike Psiaki said that since there are only a few set wheel sizes, the rest of the LEGO car is then sized accordingly by comparing it with reference photos of the real vehicle. He also talks about the hardest part of creating the set, and how working on a James Bond car was a childhood dream of his.

The LEGO James Bond Aston Martin DB5 is now available for LEGO VIPs with general availability August 1st for $149.99 USD.

Exclusive interviews with LEGO designer and Aston Martin Creative Director at London LEGO Creator Expert 10262 James Bond DB5 set launch event [News]

Earlier this morning, The Brothers Brick attended what was supposed to be a top-secret launch event at LEGO’s flagship UK store in Leicester Square, London. The silver Aston Martin DB5 parked outside the main entrance was a bit of a giveaway that today was all about the new Creator Expert 10262 James Bond DB5 set.

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TOP SECRET: LEGO 10262 James Bond Aston Martin DB5 [Review]

Despite a long sequence of cars from Lotus, BMW, Ford, and others, no other car maker featured in the James Bond movies can come close to the iconic status of Aston Martin, starting with the 1963 Aston Martin DB5 first featured in Goldfinger. Long rumored and officially announced at a special event in London earlier today (see our complete coverage here on The Brothers Brick), the latest vehicle in the LEGO Creator Expert series is 10262 James Bond Aston Martin DB5, which includes 1,290 pieces and is available now for LEGO VIPs and will be available worldwide August 1st (USD $149.99, CDN $179.99, 149.99€, £129.99, 1399DK, etc.).

Open this mission briefing to reveal CLASSIFIED information

Comes the morning, and the headlights fade away

LEGO bricks are forever. They are all I need to please me…and I am very pleased with Victor’s 1985 Aston Martin V8 Vantage, as driven by James Bond in The Living Daylights (1987). Victor has done an excellent job of sculpting out the body to replicate the look of 007’s famous ride. The use of ratchet minifigure accessories as windshield pillars works really well here, and they are angled in such a way that matches the profile of the Aston Martin. Bond’s bells and whistles are also present, including a side-mounted skis and a giant flame for a speedy getaway through the snow. If you peek inside, you will even notice the interior upholstery is textured! It’s a design that is best shaken, not stirred…

Aston Martin V8 Vantage Volante - The Living Daylights

Licensed to thrill

Continuing his obsession for stud-free minifig-scale builds of iconic movie vehicles, ER0L brings us the classic Aston Martin DB5, made famous by its appearance in the earlier James Bond movies.

Much as I love this rendition, I’m still hoping that <cough> that he is going to produce a modified version featuring revolving license plates, tire slashers, bullet-proof rear screen, front mounted machine guns and – of course – an ejector seat!

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s 007 with Little Nellie

James Bond is well known for his often slightly wacky gadgets. The gyrocopter used in You only Live Twice, recreated in minifig scale by Brian Williams (BMW_Indy), is a prime example. This odd little contraption was nicknamed Little Nellie and in the flying scenes in the movie, it was piloted by its designer, Ken Wallis, who was a former RAF WW2 bomber pilot turned inventor. He died last year, aged 97, and was tinkering with and flying gyrocopters until shortly before his death.

Little Nellie - Overview

Brian’s model uses a fair few BrickArms parts, which may upset LEGO purists, but in my opinion they are a great addition to the model. It just wouldn’t look complete without its rocket pods. The model is also complemented by some really nice custom stickers.

The cars are the stars

Back in June, I posted a collection of Eighties film and TV vehicles, which at that time consisted of four cars (and fifth one that wasn’t in the picture). Lots of people offered me suggestions for which vehicles to build next and I kept going.

Movie and TV vehicle collection

Top row from left to right: American Graffiti, The A-Team, Back to the Future, Batman (1989), Blues Brothers, The Dukes of Hazzard; middle row: Ghostbusters, Gone in 60 Seconds (2000), Inspector Morse, Knight Rider, Magnum P.I., Miami Vice; bottom row: Mr. Bean, Only Fools and Horses, Starsky & Hutch, Terminator II Judgement Day, Tomb raider and Top Gear.

By now, a few months later, I’ve got 18 vehicles. They are not all from the Eighties anymore and a few British ones sneaked in. I am really enjoying building these. Unlike many LEGO car builders, I don’t have it in me to come up with my own cool or custom car designs. I tend to build scale models of existing vehicles and most are bog-standard production versions. The cars that are the stars in movies and TV series, however, are often a bit more flamboyant. Building them means I still get to build the scale models I like so much, but with a few extra sprinkles on top and the often funny characters that go with them. There are a few obvious vehicles still missing from my collection, such as cars from any of the James Bond movies, but I am not about to stop this any time soon.

“Now the whole world will know that you died scratching my balls.”

TBB newcomer David Alexander Smith has a unique style of building that proves (once again) that you don’t need a million parts to create something original or make an impact on the hobby. David makes excellent use of negative space in his rendition of everyone’s favorite super-spy. Three cheers for minimalism.

James Bond 007