Tag Archives: Ship

The workhorses of the Commonwealth Navies

Julie Vandermeulen has recently completed a 1/38 scale model of HMCS Haida, the world’s last surviving Tribal class destroyer, which is currently a museum ship in Ontario. Its beautifully sculpted hull is an impressive 377 studs long and the model took 9 months to complete.

HMCS Haida (DDE 215)

Between 1936 and the end of WW2 a grand total of 27 Tribal class ships were built for the Royal Australian Navy, Royal Canadian Navy and (British) Royal Navy. Many of these ships fought with distinction. In British service, in particular, they were used in a number of high-risk operations and consequently sustained heavy losses, with 12 out of 16 ships sunk. Most Canadian and Australian ships survived the war and continued to serve into the fifties and sixties. The model represents Haida as she appeared in the Korean War. Her sister ship, HMCS Iroquois, was even deployed in the Cuban Missile Crisis. Tribal class destroyers may not be as well-known as the larger and more glamorous cruisers and battleships that served during WW2, but they were true workhorses. I very much appreciate seeing one of these fine ships in LEGO.

10-foot-long LEGO Model of 1930s Danish Ship MS Jutlandia

Some builds just put me at a loss for words, and this is one of them. The real MS Jutlandia was launched in 1934, and is an impressive 461 feet long. She started her life as a passenger vessel and served time during both WWII and the Korean War. She spent some time as a royal vessel, and was scrapped in 1965.

Arjan Oude Kotte (Konajra) has created this absolutely stunning minifig scale version of this lovely ship. This beautiful build ultimately took 11 months, with 5 months to design and 6 months to build. The ship itself is over 10 feet (3.25 meters) long, and stands nearly 5 feet (1.5 meters) high. He estimates 90,000-100,000 pieces total, bringing this ship to life.


I encourage you to pour over the details in the flickr gallery, which includes some WIP photos.

ms Jutlandia

An elegant vessel for a more civilized age

We see our fair share of big spaceships at the Brothers Brick, but the Crimson Pilgrim by Bob De Quatre is something special. Not only is it a beauty to behold, but it’s also built to minifig scale and fully playable, featuring a complete interior with living quarters and many other details.

But that’s not all, there’s even a cool back story to this creation: Bob has set his ship and its crew in the universe of the online game Star Wars: The Old Republic. And he’s chosen to make them Jedi Hunters, which I assume means they’re the bad guys (yeah!).

Check out the Flickr album for more images, including close-ups of the interior (which features some rather ‘Falcon-like’ details) and of course all that wonderful exterior sculpting:


Life’s a beach

When a certain young naturalist by the name of Charles Darwin joined the HMS Beagle on it’s historic 2nd voyage in 1831, camera photography was still something of an experimental science. So capturing a visual record of the trip was the responsibility of a ship’s artist, like Conrad Martens.

Historical LEGO scene builder James Pegrum has recreated one of Martens’ more unusual sketches from the trip, showing the Beagle beached for repairs at a spot near the mouth of the Rio Santa Cruz (Argentina).

Yes, everything in the picture – including the distant cliffs – is LEGO. James manages to combine his particular building and photographic skills to create a very life-like scene. If the trip had taken place 175 or so years later, I’m sure Martens would have tweeted an image just like this!

Super-detailed LEGO USS Missouri model over 4 feet long

Matt Bace spent about about 45 days creating this highly-detailed model of the World War II American battleship USS Missouri. Matt’s model is 1/200th scale, and comes in about 170 studs long (that’s about 4 and a half feet!). The real USS Missouri was commissioned in 1944, and served on and off of active duty until 1992. She served in World War II, the Korean War, and the Gulf War, making her one of America’s most historied battleships. Matt’s model is one of the best LEGO ships I’ve ever seen. The sculpting for the curved hull is notoriously difficult to achieve with LEGO, and the wood planking around the details of the superstructure is quite challenging. All in all, this is a stunning model excellently built.

USS Missouri (1:200 scale)

USS Missouri (1:200 scale)

Between the Hammer and the Anvil

The stakes for SHIPtember just keep getting higher, as Stijn Oom sets the bar up another notch. His Hammerfall GunSHIP is an instant classic; a brutally utilitarian dropship in bulkhead grey, all screaming metal and monstrous engines.

Like all the best SHIPwrights, Stijn sucks you in with the initial enormity inherent to every SHIP, but it’s the details that count and the Hammerfall has those in spades. There are too many to list, so here’s a beauty shot of some of the best.

As if this build wasn’t cool enough, it was based on artwork by the frequently featured Pierre Fieschi. This sort of exchange of ideas between builders is, to me, one of the greatest parts of the FOL community.

Rock you like a Hurricane

Tim Schwalf brings us the Hurricane Battlecruiser, a 155 stud behemoth made of equal parts smooth paneling and fantastic greebling. The smaller fighters and overall presentation kick the whole thing up to 11.

And if you’re beginning to see a trend in our coverage this month, head on over to the SHIPtember group to see these leviathans being built.

Really Quite a Super Tanker

OK, so I’m pretty sure that spaceships shouldn’t be just regular sea-going ships with space engines strapped to them, but it sure does look cool, even if it is asking for a space-sized environmental disaster. This Octan Supertanker by Evan (Lego Junkie) weighs in at 120 studs long, and comes with a space tugboat to boot.

Octan Supertanker.

Arjan’s ocean-going tug looks ready to tow anything

Arjan Oudekotte (Konajra) does not post new models all that often, but given the size of most of them, that is understandable and they are always well worth the wait. His latest model is the largest ship he has built to date, with a length of 196 cm (or roughly 6’5 for those of you who prefer antiquated measurement systems) and built out of roughly 32000 elements.

Smit Zwarte Zee

The ship in question is a Dutch ocean-going tug called the Zwarte Zee (Black Sea). The ship was launched in 1962 and until 1984 served with the famous company Smit International, known around the world for large maritime salvage operations. As usual with Arjan’s ships, it is highly detailed and has a beautifully sculpted hull (in dark red, no less). I had the pleasure of seeing this behemoth with my own two eyes last Sunday, but if you want to take in all of it, I encourage you to take a look at Arjan’s album on flickr.