About Luka

Luka is a Slovenian LEGO builder and a member of Kocke Klub. He is most well known for building dragons, but does not shy away from other themes when time is right. In the community he goes by Deus "Big D." Otiosus (D. stands for "Destiny") and has been around for quite a few years. He is one of those builders who went through their life without a dark age. Besides LEGO he is a biology student that wastes a lot of time in the local forest or in interesting urban areas. MOC Pages Flickr Bricksafe Youtube

Posts by Luka

The parrot is a pirate’s best friend

Master animal builder (and possibly pirate?) Felix Jaensch strikes again with this incredibly accurate Alexandrine parakeet. Exposed studs add a feather-like texture and the parrot’s shape is pretty much perfect. The best part has to be its characteristic beak with a rubber band used as the border. Now we need to see this bird on the builder’s shoulder!

Alexandrine Parakeet (new, improved version)

Everything you need to be happy is right there, in your heart

Delving deeper into the artistic aspect of LEGO building, Timofey Tkachev follows up his previous build of a blood fountain with a strong image of spring rain, which has a very impressionist feel to it. The composition makes for a very powerful image, with contrast between colours and textures drawing the eye to the man holding his umbrella over the kneeling girl. The best part has to be the difference between the rain drops above and below the stone platform, which makes the rainfall look very dynamic. While the rockwork could be less repetitive, I think it blends in with the textured background well, making for a very consistent creation.

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LEGO Resistance Skimmer from Star Wars: The Last Jedi

The recent Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi teaser trailer has sparked a lot of dicussion amongst fans, but the visuals are undoubtedly breathtaking. The most impressive of all would be the speeder scene from the planet Crait, which has already inspired many LEGO builders to make their version. One of the earliest is this one by Grant Davis, and I am sure it will remain one of the best for a long time. Grant does an incredible job recreating the speeder with the already iconic red dust trail, inspired by a mere six seconds of blurry video. The speeder has excellent shaping and Grant’s signature greebling (which ironicaly he most often uses on pirate-themed builds), but the highlight would have to be the coloured lines, some of which he achieved with rubber bands.

Resistance Skimmer

Judging from this build, The Last Jedi will bring a lot of inspiration to LEGO builders, and I can’t wait to see what we see next.

I want to discover the secret path a bird delivered into my heart

We’ve recently featured a sci-fi diorama sporting some nice portals, but this diorama by I Scream Clone places portals in a very different theme indeed. Both of these were built for a loosely connected collaborative project named “Portals” presented during the Sydney Brick Show. The builder brings an oldschool castle diorama to the table, with some very good structures, but mostly simple landscaping that helps the portals stand out even better. I wonder, are these dioramas really connected…

Wanderlust

A medieval construction site that will go down in history

Often LEGO creations are simplified, cartoony versions of what they represent, with some details skipped for a better overall effect. Hardly so in this medieval construction site by Jonas Kramm. There are more realistic details here than I could count, but I should point out the wooden supports and the amazing stone brick construction. Most importantly, the scene feels real. The composition and minifig action really make you feel like you are back in time.

Medieval contruction site

Mining with spaceships and portals

Everybody likes a good Classic Space model, and this crystal mining diorama by Brick Knight has all the right details. From the characteristic grey-blue colour scheme with yellow and black stripes, to antennas and recreations of vintage sets, all placed on a tan landscape, just like the box arts of the 1980s. The cracks filled with green minerals break up the landscape very well, but the main focus is obviously in the sci-fi elements like space stations, spaceships and most notably the round portals. The builder explains the diorama as an uninhabited planet where the Classic Space explorers discovered a new energy source and are mining it for its engineering uses.

Tregatis VI Mining Operation-1

Click to see more of this space outpost

The most subtle way to celebrate Easter

As Christian and Christian-influenced areas of the world celebrate Easter, we see many representations of Easter eggs and religious motives, with an occasional Easter bunny. This rabbit by accomplished animal builder Felix Jaensch is more loosely related to this subject, as it would be a great creation any time of the year, but the timing still pushes it a bit further.

Rabbit

The rabbit is built in Felix’s signature style, a realistic but pixelated shape with some finer shaping on the head. The bright tan overall colour and white belly draw the eye and make for a very fluffy effect. I just want to cuddle it! (…if I could catch it)

A very, VERY mad punk mecha

When one hears the phrase “LEGO mecha“, the name of the legendary Japanese builder Moko is probably one of the first that springs to mind. While he was one of the builders to define the genre, he still continiues to progress it, as is the case with his latest mecha, MFS-11 MAD Garm. After over a decade of active building, Moko can still make mecha that look unique and memorable. There is a lot to love here, from poseability to its unique face and the awesome mohawk. The mecha’s posture and spikes both add to a complete, menacing look. This is definetely not something I want to meet in a dark alley, no matter how unlikey that would be.

MFS-11 MAD Garm

Beauty always comes with dark thoughts

Russian builder Timofey Tkachev has been on a roll lately with some great creations, but now he follows up his two lighthearted creations of a man working out and a builder’s living room with this discomforting yet enchanting sculpture of a blood fountain, shaped as a girl.

fountain of blood in the shape of a girl 1

The grace of the figure is both complimented and contrasted by the sinewy and visceral texture of its body, which may symbolize how close we really are to our darkest side. It is important to point out the stone base as well, which completes the creation and gives it a fantasy feel, reminding me of the aesthetic of Blizzard’s Diablo games.

A well-built stick hut as sturdy as stone

It’s a bit strange when a LEGO creation is sturdier than the subject it represents. Such is the case with this weathered hut by Grant Davis, which looks like a bunch of bricks were thrown together without proper connections and then collapsed immediately after being photographed.

A Weathered Lodging

That is most definetely not the case, as Grant shows in his very informative video, where he even turns the build upside-down — and it remains intact! The ground texture and colours should also be pointed out, as the builder achieves a very realistic effect by using closely related colours in natural looking patterns.

To infinite creativity and beyond!

I understand that this somewhat technically and conceptually simple sculpture of Toy Story‘s Buzz Lightyear may not appear terribly innovative, especially having been built by one of the most renowned LEGO builders in the community, Tyler Clites. But context is the key here, as this was made as a live build at a festival, in 10 hours with no planning. I have rushed builds myself before, but never at this level. I think it’s safe to say that not many people are capable of making a creation this impressive in so little time, at least not at the scale of Tyler’s Buzz Lightyear.

To Infinity And Beyond!

When the zombies come, a damp cellar is like a palace

While not luxurious, it is definetely the desire of any apocalypse survivor to find somewhere like this cellar to hunker down. This particular “palace” by Gareth Gidman was built for the Brrraaaaaaaiiiiinnnssss!!! contest on Eurobricks. The cellar section looks very lived-in, with weapons and sustenance positioned so it looks filled, but not cluttered. I should point out the use of broken tiles; while not purist, it is good that the builder found a way to still use his ruined pieces. On the ground level we see some well-built decay with a broken window, overgrowth, and cracks in the walls. Some nice minifig action makes for a well-rounded scene.

The Hideout

(As a side note, I have seen brown pieces break much more often than other colours, and seeing Gareth’s broken brown tiles, I am more convinced that this is statistically relevant.)