Tag Archives: Diorama

There’s nothing like a massive LEGO diorama to prove that you’ve arrived as a LEGO builder. The LEGO dioramas we feature here span everything from realistic medieval castles to scenes from World War II, and more than a few post-apocalyptic wastelands.

Step right up! to the LEGOLand Circus

There’s something wonderfully old-fashioned about the latest model built by Nick Barrett (TechnicNick), the LEGOLand circus. Before there were minifigs, LEGO already made the much larger maxifigs (although nobody called them that at the time). Their upper torsos and heads were specialised parts, but their bodies were brick-built. I had a few of these as a child and my sister had a much larger collection. Nick, who is a few years older than me, has combined these classic figures with modern parts and top-notch build techniques in this fantastic model.

Legoland Circus

Apparently I’m not alone in liking this, because Nick’s model won the 6th annual MocOlympics contest. Check out the details (and what happens after the fuze on the cannon is lit) on MOCPages.

The Geher 9 Mecha Stops for Maintenance

I missed this MaK creation, when Kosmas Santosa ( first posted it. Fortunately, he’s followed up with a nice little scene, giving me a chance to blog this cool mecha. The tool cart and gas can are both nice details that help make the scene. The builder also found a nice chunk of broken down wall for background, it looks great.

Geher 9 Maintenance Service

The Crown Knights’ Castle on the Rocks

It comes as no surprise that Kiwi builder David Hensel (Legonardo Davidy) has produced another fantastic castle. I really like the base on this one, as David is perfecting the slope-built rock technique. The wood-plank front door is also quite nice, and the stone walls have just enough texturing to look appropriately weathered without going overboard.

Joker’s Funhouse immortalized in Lego

Paul Hetherington is one of the most skilled builders for building a diorama and bringing it to life with animated elements. His Joker’s Funhouse display is not only impressive to look at, but it features many ingenious moving elements that make me scratch my head and wonder how it’s done. Check out the video below and see for yourself. It’s no surprise that this creation won Best in Show at this year’s BrickCon.

Lego Batman and Robin, Joker's Funhouse

Enter into Erebor, the dwarf city from The Hobbit

Blake Baer and Jack Bittner showcased their third castle collaboration at BrickFair earlier this year, and now they have taken photos of the display for everyone to enjoy. The creation uses around 80,000 pieces and stands 4’8″ tall. It features a colorful marketplace, a beautiful wooded area and of course, the gate of Erebor. You can see the entire gallery on Flickr along with a video and a shot with the builders for scale. If you want to see construction photos, check out more on MOCpages.

Erebor

What Time Do You Build?

Nick V. (Brickthing) builds at 9 o’clock, if you judge by the stately grandfather clock in the corner of this room of inspiration. Meant to represent all the different places Nick draws inspiration, the room is packed full of references to online communities and fellow fans who focus Nick’s creativity. Look closely, and you’ll notice that even the landscape outside the window is brick-built – something on which it would be incredibly easy to take a shortcut.

Time to Construct - Builder's Study

Runaway train

Caleb Randolph has taken train dioramas to the next level with “Anastasia”: Runaway Train. The detailed, raised mountain platform and use of classic train tracks to give a continuous edge is especially masterful. And that’s ignoring the excellent snow, steam, and, of course, the locomotive itself. Brilliant work.

IMG_0469

London in a snow globe

The professional builders from Bright Bricks have a reputation to uphold for building big things for Christmas. In 2011 their 38 ft brick-built Christmas tree dazzled travelers passing through St. Pancras Station in London and set a record for being the world’s largest LEGO tree. Last year they built the world’s largest LEGO Advent Calendar for Covent Garden. This year they’ve built a fantastic collection of London landmarks to go inside the world’s largest LEGO snow globe. It measures an impressive 3m x 3m x 3m (10ft x 10ft x 10ft). It’s quite possibly the only LEGO snow globe and neither the snow nor the globe are made of LEGO, but who cares?

London South 2

Snow gets blown through the globe and it has a tunnel down the middle that visitors can walk through, to be pretty much surrounded by it and to possibly feel a bit like London mayor Boris Johnson did in Feb 2009, when one of the largest snowfalls in recent history dumped 20 cm of white flakes on his city, bringing it to a stand-still.

Big Ben and Nelson's column

I had the pleasure of visiting the Bright Bricks workshop in early October, when this project had just gotten underway. It must be tempting to cut some corners (perhaps even literally) here and there when building professionally for an audience that largely consists of people who don’t build with LEGO and who may not appreciate all the intricacies, but these are high-quality models. Having seen some of the builds at an early stage, I was very impressed by the level of detail and the clever build techniques that went into them.

The snow globe is on display at Covent Garden London until early January.