Tag Archives: Lamborghini

Lamborghini Centanario: a car with killer curves

Anyone who has ever fallen in love with the romance of the Lamborghini knows the seductive power of its lines. The Centanario, designed in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Mr. Ferruccio Lamborghini, exemplifies everything brilliant about the alluring shape of its cars. Builder Lachlan Cameron has pulled out all the stops to replicate the sweeping form of the Centanario in LEGO Technic form.

Lamborghini Centanario

Sliding carefully selected Technic beams over flexi tube, he has captured the unique flow from bonnet to mudguards that defines the car. Add in a host of features such as superbly modelled doors, bucket seats and functioning lighting and you have a fitting tribute to one of today’s most recognisable supercars.

Lamborghini Centanario

Who drove it best? Lamborghini Aventador or Toyota Prius

A couple of really high quality LEGO car models rolled across our monitors this week so I thought we’d take the opportunity to feature both models, hailing from very different economic classes but from a pair of equally talented creators. On the affordable-by-the-common-man end of the spectrum, we have hachiroku24‘s Toyota Prius model topping out around USD$24,000. And he’s provided a handy parts guide and instructional video.

Lego Toyota Prius MOC

Breaking the bank at the other end of the scale is Jonathan Elliot‘s high class USD$400,000 Lamborghini Aventador.

Lamborghini Aventador

I genuinely appreciate when iconic shapes are accomplished with creative parts use, and both these cars fit that qualification. Both builders are masters of their craft, consistently perfecting minifig scale automobiles. My absolute favorite new(er) piece use here is the front bumper of the start white Aventador achieved with mirrored Wedge 2×1 with stud notch Left and Right. It’s such a distinctive shape at such a small scale. The utilitarian grey Prius’ curved frame is brought about with flex cable and the Bar Holder with Handle

And if you like these cars as much as we do, make sure to check out hachiroku’s chill, easy-to-follow VW Bus building instructions from last week and Jonathan’s trio of classic cars shared earlier this summer.

This LEGO Lamborghini Countach is a red-hot Italian classic extravaganza

While I do love me some Speed Champions, I do really enjoy seeing fan creations using techniques that trim off most of the visible studs to give a car a sleek and smooth look. This Lamborghini Countach by Simon Przepiorka is one of those tiny wonders that make my jaw drop. I’ve always been a fan of the Countach and this is one of the best representations that I’ve seen at this scale thus far.

Italian classic extravaganza

Click to see more details of Simon’s LEGO Countach

Lamborghini Centenario in all its glory

Just as the Lamborghini Centenario pays homage to the vision of Ferrucio Lamborghini, this LEGO Centenario built by Lachlan Cameron gives tribute to the already iconic supercar. Clad in black with red highlights, this model features illuminated headlights and taillights, elegant scissor doors, chromed tailpipes, and even a personalized California license plate! The wheels from the Porsche 911 GT3 RS complement the overall impression of this model.

Lamborghini Centenario- new doors

Click to see more views of this supercar

You do not make modifications on a Countach. That car is perfect!

I imagine making any car instantly recognizable at minifigure scale would be difficult, and George Panteleon does it beautifully with his LEGO Lamborghini Countach. He made great part choices for the windscreen and the headlights, and the lines of the sports car are captured rather well in a 7-stud-wide package.

Lamborghini Countach

See more of George’s minifigure-scaled vehicles on his Flickr.

LEGO Lamborghini Aventador Superveloce in 1:16 scale

Jordanian builder Firas Abu-Jaber presents a 1:16 replica of a Lamborghini Aventador Superveloce worthy of his stunning lineup of LEGO supercars. The lines and subtle angles and slopes throughout are faithful to the real thing. Custom decals over the rear wheels, on the hood, and as the license plates are fine touches that I believe enhance the model.

LEGO Lamborghini Aventador SuperVeloce

The doors open to reveal a detailed interior. The seats may be my favorite detail in Firas’s excellent model; they appear comfortable for a LEGO man behind the wheel.

LEGO Lamborghini Aventador SuperVeloce

1:10 Scale Lamborghini Aventador

Nick Barrett proves it is possible to capture the lines of a Lamborghini Aventador beautifully with LEGO parts. His 1:10 scale replica includes working suspension and steering, a detailed interior and V12 engine covered by cleverly built glass panels.

And the winners of the 75th LUGnuts challenge are

About four weeks ago, I announced the 75th build challenge organised by LUGNuts, the online group for LEGO car nuts. There normally are no prizes for the challenges, but because this was our 75th we decided to add a little extra incentive. Members could build a car, obviously, but with other members assigning the car in question. The builders of the winning cars get prizes, but also the members who suggested them. The judges had a hard time choosing, but after I tallied up all the votes, we reached a conclusion. Without further ado, here are the winners of the 75th LUGnuts challenge. The comments below the images, written in italic script, are by Lino Martins ( Lino M), who, for lack of a better word, serves as LUGNuts’ ringleader.

In first place:
1967 Ford Mustang GT500
Pēteris Sproģis shows us all how its done with his stunning1967 Ford GT500. He could have stopped at just building the car, but he sets the scene and tells a story with an entire diorama of a Mustang car pulling a Mustang horse.

In second place:
Lamborghini Egoista
What happens when Lamborghini turns 50 and has a midlife crisis? The Egoista, as built by Curtis D. Collins (curtydc). Trophy brides half your age will forgive a guy’s pot belly and comb-over if he owned this baby. But you can’t take her with you as its only a one-seater. Awesome job, Curty!

In third place:
Ford RS200, LUGnuts 75th challenge.
Lego Junkie. lives up to his name with his totally awesome Ford RS-200. (…) Good show, Junkie. May you never seek recovery for your addiction.

The winning cars were assigned by Raphael Granas (r a p h y ), Rolands Kirpis (Rolic) and Dylan Denton (/>ylan/>.), respectively.

We post contest announcements on TBB fairly regularly, but I realise that we don’t actually always show the outcome. If it is this good, however, that’s a big omission. Congratulations guys!

The Miura is a red raging bull

Italian tractor manufacturer Ferruccio Lamborghini was a man not to be messed with. When he complained to Enzo Ferrari (of the eponymous sports-car manufacturer) that the busted clutch on his Ferrari was the same one as he used on his company’s tractors and about poor service, Enzo Ferrari famously snubbed him by telling him that, as a tractor manufacturer, Lamborghini couldn’t know anything about sports cars. Lamborghini set out to prove him wrong, by starting a company to build the best Grand Tourer money could buy. He chose a raging bull as the company’s emblem.
Since then Lamborghini has become famous for its supercars and, according to the guys from Top Gear, is the maddest car company of them all. Senator Chinchilla has built an excellent model of one of the fist ones: the Miura Jota

Lamborghini Miura Jota

Unlike Ferrari, Lamborghini doesn’t have a racing history, focusing on road cars. The Miura Jota however, was a development of the road car intended for racing. This explains the particularly unadorned look of the car, when compared to the already very clean design of the ‘normal’ Miura. The car never took part in a race, however. In typical Lamborghini fashion it crashed and then burned to a cinder during a test drive.

Most of the car models we feature are basically detailed sculptures, with perhaps a few functions such as steering or opening doors. I don’t tend to blog pure Technic models. This is not because I don’t appreciate the skill involved in building them, but for me it’s about the aesthetic. I prefer the look of system builds. Senator Chinchilla’s Miura has a beautifully sculpted body, with opening doors and an opening clam-shell engine cover. Underneath the voluptuous curves lurks a Technic chassis with steering, working suspension, gearbox and a transversely mounted engine, like the real car. It combines the best of both worlds.

Thanks to Jack Marquez (Ewok in Disguise) for the suggestion.

The Lamborghini Countach is Eighties car porn

As a child, back in the Eighties, I had a poster of Lego set 5580 Highway Rig, above my bed and I know I’m not the only LEGO car builder who fancied that particular model. However, if there would have been poster of the Lamborghini Countach built by Rolling Bricks back then, I might have replaced the poster with its image.

Countach 07

The Countach was the maddest supercar of the Eighties. It was super fast and hugely impractical and had a shape that was out of this world. The LEGO version is pretty much super too. Check out the clever half-stud offsets for the front fender and the SNOT work used for the rear one as well. In fact, every time I look at this model I notice some clever combination of parts and it wouldn’t be complete without working scissor doors. It’s hard to imagine this car being done better on this scale.

Baby Lambo

We’ve seen a few large-scale Lamborghini Gallardo models here on The Brothers Brick over the years, but Mateusz Mikołajczyk (Matix22) goes much smaller. He pulls it off nicely — a challenging feat at this scale.

Lamborghini Gallardo 1

Larwenz’s 1982 Lamborghini Countach

If you were a boy in the 1980s, you probably had some sort of Lamborghini Countach merchandise, be it a poster on your bedroom wall (in James May’s case) or a somewhat more nerdy pencil holder (in mine).

Larwenz takes us back to those days when we could dream of roaring down the open road, squealing to a stop, and stepping out from those distinctive doors.

LEGO Lamborghini Countach model

I think my favorite detail is the turntable base on the white inside of the doors.

Via Klocki.