About Luka

Luka is a Slovenian LEGO builder and a member of Kocke Klub. He is most well known for building dragons, but does not shy away from other themes when time is right. In the community he goes by Deus "Big D." Otiosus (D. stands for "Destiny") and has been around for quite a few years. He is one of those builders who went through their life without a dark age. Besides LEGO he is a biology student that wastes a lot of time in the local forest or in interesting urban areas. MOC Pages Flickr Bricksafe Youtube

Posts by Luka

Tarakava, terror of the shores

The earliest LEGO Bionicle sets were drastically different from much later sets in the series, along with the constraction (constructible action) figures of today. The classic Rahi set Tarakava that inspired this revamp by [Jack Frost] uses barely any ball joints or specialized weapon elements from the Bionicle theme. Despite this, I feel it embodies the spirit of Bionicle more than the theme’s later releases. This build is part of a series of Rahi set re-imaginings, of which we recently featured Muaka and a Colony Drone.

Tarakava

I love how the builder kept all the iconic pieces of the original set (or rather half of the set, as there were two creatures in the original), such as the dark turquoise Kanohi mask and claw weapon used to form the creature’s huge fangs. Then there are the older-style Technic panels on the face, which keep the model as silly-looking as the set from 2001. The repetitive use of other teal elements also adds a lot of spiny character to this amphibious predator.

This mech packs a big blue punch

A few days ago, every second post on the Brothers Brick was a mech, robot or cyborg – from classic mecha to four legged robots and Bionicle set remakes. Now that things have cooled off and we all regained some mecha sensitivity, we have a big blue mech with gorilla-like proportions by Jason Corlett to show off. The mech is called Big Blue and the name says it all. Its size is complimented by the bulky proportions, namely huge fists and shoulders.

There is a lot to love in this build, from all sorts of technical details (my favourite being the stacked dark gray Technic pulley wheels on the legs) to part use like the Kaukau Nuva Kanohi mask in the mech’s chest. Jason says he was inspired by LEGO power functions LED lights. The picture below has a better view of the light-up features.

Dark red spaceship in the darkness of space

I feel like a little technical backstory will give you a deeper understanding and hopefully respect for Jonathan Walker‘s huge red spaceship. LEGO bricks are moulded with an accuracy in the range of micrometers, but they do not fit together air-tight – that would make construction and deconstruction difficult and even impossible at hot summer temperatures. At a very close look, two basic bricks have a little seam between them when connected to adjacent studs. Many readers may ask themselves what this has to do with this article, and the answer is – everything! This seam between bricks allows for a chain of 1×2 bricks connected in a staggered line to bend and form a very smooth and large circle – a technique quite popular among space builders for large creations.

Instrument of Sgorbulon

A few years ago the LEGO part of the internet was flooded with angular spaceships built in gray with a line of colour here and there, and even though the theme of space is more diverse now, ships with this many curves still surprise. And about the gray with strips of colour – Jonathan has completely inverted this, creating a dark red beauty that will make an impression on everyone. Obviously this ship is not the first Jonathan has made. Seeing his latest build made me explore his Flickr photostream and you should do so too. Nearly all of his creations are humongous spaceships with beautiful designs, often including rounded shapes like the Instrument of Sgorbulon featured here. Sadly the builder only shared one clean photo of the build, but zooming into the image might still have you hooked for quite a while.

Life-sized Thanos Infinity Gauntlet will make half your LEGO collection disappear

While the LEGO company works to find sustainable ways to produce their plastic products in a world with limited resources, Brickatecture knew there was only one way to save the world of LEGO — or at least, he was the only one with the will to act. He has gone to extreme measures and spent three months over the last year building a marvelous weapon. Judging by the Infinity Gauntlet’s size, it gives him the power to make at least half of his own LEGO collection disappear. Now it is perfectly balanced, as all things should be.

1-1 Scale Wearable LEGO Infinity Gauntlet

The build is quite accurate to the famous weapon from Avengers: Infinity War, as well as an amazing creation on its own. The shaping is very clean and bold using large polygons to construct the complex non-rectangular shapes while keeping it wearable, and the smaller curves of the palm and fingers are done using curved slopes at different angles.

1-1 Scale Wearable LEGO Infinity Gauntlet

And if you’re still not awed by its might, take note that Thanos’ glove weighs 4.2 lbs and contains more than 2,000 pieces. And it cost him… everything.

Enormous Zorin from Walking War Robots in LEGO form stands nearly as tall as a person

If you have stayed up to date with The Brothers Brick the past few days, you may have noticed we have featured quite a lot of mecha recently. But if you thought you’d seen it all, I have news for you, because what we have here is the largest dose of mecha you have probably ever gotten in one go. Taking inspiration from the videogame Walking War Robots, iomedes! creates the most iconic mech available in the game in LEGO at a mind-boggling scale, standing nearly five feet tall at the tips of its guns.

ZORIN (зорин) class heavy bot "Butch Bunny"

All the conventional techniques and rules of mecha building go out the window at a scale like this. Joints which would mostly be a few pieces allowing for articulation and covered by a panel or two simply would not cut it in this creation and are rather replaced with complex brick-built domes and arches. Continue reading

This kitty is no matoran’s pet

A small group of Bionicle builders have been reworking sets and themes from the early years of the Bionicle theme. They have just recently released pictures of another collaboration in my favourite Bionicle subtheme – Rahi (basically “animals”) from 2001. This build is Muaka from the 8538-1 Muaka & Kane-Ra set, reimagined by Red.

Muaka

There is so much to love in the set’s reinterpretation. The builder stays faithful to the original with hoses on front legs and treads on the hind ones, but integrates them perfectly to achieve a smooth flow. And speaking of smooth flow, the tail is quite organic, made out of a 3mm flex tube element going through yellow 2×2 dish pieces and small tyres. My favourite part is the use of giant arms on the mouth, giving it the feline look that the original set lacked (which always looked more like two T-rexes…).

Searching for light in a dark world

Presentation can make all the difference in evaluating a LEGO model. Sometimes the photography is just as impressive as the build itself. Revan New brings us a moody post-apocalyptic scene full of mystery and unique parts usage. The picture is more than just a study on lighting, using a fog machine, or image composition. Instead, it is more about combining multiple camera tricks in order to provide visual context for compelling storytelling.

Lantern Mecha's Islands

The build uses minifig lantern pieces to form much of the mecha’s structure. It was created as a study in parts for the LEGO blog, New Elementary, but the unique parts usage does not end with lanterns. For example, there is the wheel cover piece used as the ship’s engine and all the fun bits piled atop the roof. However, my favorite aspect of the scene would have to be the realistic rocks. Most of the surfaces are well-textured with angles between larger pieces achieving much of the sculpting. , of course done very carefully and not at all random. There are several other photos of this build on Revan New’s Flickr photostream and his article on New Elementary. With the article, you can see how some parts were done but, for me, this single photo makes the greatest impact.

A classic cartoon captured in Classic Space [Instructions]

With the recent release of the 70841 Benny’s Space Squad set from The LEGO Movie 2 and the upcoming 40th anniversary of Classic Space, there is bound to be a spike in popularity for what is already one of the most popular LEGO themes. Contributing to this spike is this creation by Miro Dudas, a rover that is heavily inspired by a classic car most of us are probably familiar with… The Flintstones‘ car!

Benny's PT-Cruiser

The build captures the angular and minimalist style of Classic Space sets, but its simplicity has an added bonus – why not make your own with the instructions provided by the builder? Miro has built the rover in a few alternative themes himself, both digitally and physically, as seen below.

The future is here with Futuron

A laser axe for felling enemies, not space trees

If you have been following the Brothers Brick for a while, you are probably familiar with the figure-building madman known as Eero Okkonen, who is known to often produce his masterful figure builds on a weekly basis or faster. This time Eero brings us a creation that he built a while back, but only recently shared online. It is a part of a series of Japanese video-game inspired characters we have been following on the Brothers Brick for a while now.

HAVOC-DISSECT IV

The build is faithful to the series, using the striking colour scheme and Clickits strings as laser blades on the amazing space axe. On the other hand, it is unique and a clear improvement on previous installments. There are so many exotic pieces used in unique ways that I can not even begin to cover, but what stands out most is the wildly flowing hair made of balloon panels in earth orange.

Palm oil is made of orangutan tears

When LEGO announced their first plant-based plastic elements, some people were concerned how the plant material would be sourced and whether LEGO would clear rainforests for farm land. The irony of the situation is that most people who complain about LEGO’s alleged ecological crime (which the LEGO Group denies) also eat food made using palm oil, which is proven to be a major cause of tropical deforestation. One thing is for sure, with this oranguan build by Simon Pickard and the right context, LEGO bricks may benefit the rainforests through raising awareness of what is happening to our planet.

Orangutan

The use of earth orange and studs shown on all sides really captures the furry look of an orangutan and the dark gray parts are a great contrast as the skin, both in colour and texture. The proportions are spot on and the pose is quite expressive too. The build’s seeming simplicity is a strong point too; I can really imagine this creation sitting on a desk or on a shelf, reminding us of the diversity of life.

The future is bright, colourful and apocalyptic

Maybe it’s the light blue water or maybe it’s the cheerfully bright photography of this LEGO creation by lokiloki29, but it looks almost like a postapocalyptic world would be quite the place to live. Minus the whole probably being dead thing.

New refuge

The overall scene looks mostly simple, combining few large monochromatic sections like the water, the grass, and the containers. The real details are hidden inside the containers and around them in the shape of a little tree, a very well made gradient of the oozing toxic waste, and a cute shelter inside the upper container.

New refuge

Warning! Do not copy! A violation of these instructions will result in cell lysis!

Six months ago, we featured an incredibly unique spacecraft by Dwalin Forkbeard, but now he is back with a new installment in the series. This virus-inspired LEGO spaceship called Heavy Transport M11 Phage expands on his previous build both from a technical and design point of view. He’s also given it an even more molecular twist with a double strand of DNA in the cargo compartment, built out of two tipper beds he had lying around trying to find a use for. Most builders, myself included, will surely relate to the feeling of having a unique piece they desperately want to find a use for, and this is a great showcase of how to perfectly integrate them.

Heavy Transport M11 Phage

The spaceship has some killer colour blocking and oozes with intense technical detail like hoses, gears and pistons. I love the custom sticker saying PHAGE and the extra effort in the presentation, but the best detail is probably everyone’s favourite, the double helix.