Tag Archives: Steampunk

Looking at these LEGO steampunk models, you can almost hear the hiss of steam, the clank of gears, and the whirr of clockwork. The steampunk aesthetic isn’t all wood and brass, so be sure to check out all the colorful models alongside classic steampunk creations from around the world.

The Extraordinary League of Justice

Purists beware: Hammerstein NWC is all up in your grill with his latest batch of minifigs. Steam Punk meets the Justice League, with this amusing lineup of familiar heroes: Nautical Man, Luster Lady, Albert Jordan, Super Chap, The Martian Gentleman Hunter, Bat-Fellow and The Flash Esq.

The Extraordinary League of Justice

My 5 year old daughter and I have been watching Justice League cartoons recently so naturally I solicited her opinion on the photo. She liked Wonder Woman’s bling, was disturbed by Batman’s ‘mustache’, but what she really wanted to know was: “why is Super Panties so angry?” Good question daughter…good question.

The Golden Empress Airship

Guy H. (V&A Steamworks) built this beauty, which heavily employs aftermarket parts. It’s a gorgeous piece of art, and a terrific Eastern take on the usually European steampunk theme, but it does cause me to wonder: just how much of a model can be aftermarket parts before it stops being a “LEGO creation”? Whatever you decide, I hope Guy builds more stuff like this.

The Golden Empress by V&A Steamworks

Strandbeest inspired, post-apocalyptic LEGO by Jason Allemann

We’ve posted a couple of LEGO Strandbeest’s here before, but never one wearing clothes. Jason Allemann (True Dimensions) left his version (inspired by Chris Magno) in a box for six years until giving it a post-apocalyptic makeover and posting it yesterday (dated May, apparently). And of course one must watch the video. And to make it even cooler still, Jason has posted instructions for the frame.

EDIT (TG + AB): TR and I posted at exactly the same time, so I include my short description above and leave TR to the rest of the post

I have typed and re-typed this post a few times now, but apparently I am not feeling very eloquent today. So I’ll just keep this simple…flickr user True Dimensions has had this in the works for six years. I am glad he decided to pull it out of the box and dust it off, because it is thoroughly good.

Land Ship

It is just too bloody much fun watching this thing clatter across the floor.

He was also nice enough to offer instruction on how to build your own walking frame on his website.

The Zephyr’s Knave

Although I’m not a huge fan of Steampunkery in general, I like to think I know a quality build when I see it. Tommy M (Eklund!) is clearly a man who knows the advantage of having an exclamation point after his name and a man who knows a thing or two about avoiding the pitfalls of thematic convention. I’m ready for Steampunk to run its course, if it hasn’t already, but so long as there are builds like this around, I’ll put up with it.

Description

Oh, and I really like his use of nets….you don’t see enough quality net usage anymore.

A Temple in the Clouds

A temple in clouds of steam and smoke, that is. This Japanese shrine reminds me more than a bit of the great wizard Howl’s Moving Castle, though Jimmy’s (6kyubi6) version has some different styling cues. It’s gorgeous all the same, and sure to instill a healthy respect for religion in anyone who comes across its path.

The mysterious Machine n°2

Vince Toulouse has found a use for the massive ship’s hull that comes in Cragger’s Command Ship — turn it upside down and make it the body of a magical airship.

Machine n°2 by Vince_Toulouse on Flickr

The narrow seam or gap between the lower gray section of the hull and the large olive-green section adds a nice detail, and I can certainly imagine all that magical electricity buzzing this thing through the clouds.

Via twee affect.

Gorgeous Bioshock Infinite City of Skyholm in LEGO

Russian fan Mister Fedin (Fianat) has created this stunning bit of steampunkery, heavily influenced by the much-hyped Bioshock Infinite game which launched just yesterday. This flying city block may have a rather traditional steampunk color-scheme, but Fedin has used it to great effect. I particularly love how this wonderful architectural menagerie includes elements influenced by LEGO’s own modular city buildings, yet with some lovely twists. I also simply must mention the lovely photography and choice of backdrop here: it really makes this model shine. Don’t ever underestimate how much a bit of good photography can improve your model’s presentation.

SKYHOLM- the flying city