Tag Archives: Architecture

LEGO provides the perfect medium for recreating the buildings and landmarks of the world — LEGO has even released a line of official LEGO Architecture sets. Check out our coverage of the official sets, and don’t miss all the gorgeous architectural models created by LEGO fans from around the world.

Nine chapels of St. Basil’s Cathedral are a marvelous example of LEGO microscale architecture

Markus Rollbühler is a LEGO product designer based in Billund, Denmark. Despite spending his weekdays working with LEGO pieces, Markus challenges himself to build microscale versions of the world’s most famous cathedrals in his spare time. His very special series of architectural masterpieces featuring Frauenkirche Dresden and Santa Maria della Salute is now joined by a marvelous copy of St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow, Russia.

St. Basil's Cathedral, Moscow

St. Basil’s Cathedral is famous for its nine chapels of vibrant colors. Markus did an amazing job recreating each of them in a unique building style using bricks, hoses, slopes, and tiles of over a dozen different colors. However, the most genius trick of the build is nine sonic screwdrivers right from Doctor Who sets used as crosses on top of the chapels.

St. Basil's Cathedral, Moscow

And, of course, the cathedral is totally worth checking out from all angles — make sure you visit Markus’ photosream for more high-res pictures!

A place to observe the stars

Unfortunately, Madrid now suffers from too much light pollution to be a good spot for observing the stars and planets. The Real Observatorio de Madrid remains the seat of the Spanish National Astronomical Observatory and houses historic scientific equipment, including a 25-foot reflecting telescope from the 18th Century. Víctor M. Nouvilas has built a fantastic LEGO version of the Observatory in the style of LEGO’s own Architecture theme. Victor has captured the neoclassical style of the building with its clean lines and,  in particular, the dramatic columns of the main entrance and the circular temple-like dome on top.

Real Observatorio de Madrid

An elegant 1930s scene complete with tailor shop and tarot readings

There is a lot going on in this modular-style street scene by Agata Pakita. Apparently we are back in the 1930s, judging by the outfits and car on show. The lower floors of the buildings house an arts and crafts store, a tailor, and a mysterious woman who reads tarot cards and predicts your fate. The colourful architecture is a lovely combination of LEGO’s more muted palette of medium dark flesh, light grey, dark red, and tan. I love the curvaceous greenhouse on the roof of the building, where an older lady and her cat relax away from the bustling street.
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See more photos of this beautiful modular building

TBB Weekly Brick Report: LEGO news roundup for April 9, 2017 [News]

The Brothers Brick gives you the best of LEGO news and reviews. This is our Weekly Brick Report for the second week of April 2017.

71018 Collectible Minifigures Series 17

TBB NEWS & REVIEWS: What a week for news! We learned about four new sets and reviewed three other sets for your LEGO enjoyment.


TBB INTERVIEWS & INSTRUCTIONS: Buildable droids and a Star Wars interview! What a time to be alive.

Read more LEGO news from around the web

Build your own city of tomorrow

Who hasn’t taken LEGO to school in their lunchbox before? Simon Liu received a cool Build your city of Tomorrow lunchbox as part of LEGO Canada’s celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday. Simon was then inspired to build his futuristic version of Toronto inside the lunchbox! I love that future microscale Toronto features plenty of greenery throughout the city, including on the roofs of skyscrapers, but the highlight for me is the little tube transportation system. However, I don’t know how much luck Simon’s going to have transporting his miniature city in the lunchbox without losing the top of the CN Tower.

City of Tomorrow

LEGO Architecture 21035 Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum [Review]

As we reported from Toy Fair in February, the April 2017 LEGO Architecture releases include a redesigned Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (21035). The new LEGO Guggenheim includes 744 pieces and retails for $79.99.

21035 Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

This latest Guggenheim is a new edition of an earlier LEGO Architecture set released in 2009. We’ll compare the two versions later in this review.

Click to read the full review

12-foot-long LEGO Golden Gate Bridge is realistically suspended

Microscale architecture builder Rocco Buttliere has achieved a remarkable feat of LEGO engineering with his 40,000+ piece model of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, California. Like the actual suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate strait, Rocco’s beautiful and highly detailed LEGO rendition crosses its 6 foot long central span suspended by a combination of red string, Technic bushings, LEGO flexible hoses, and non-LEGO metal wire.

Golden Gate Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge

Rocco’s LEGO model even includes the buildings and landscaping of the Presidio in Golden Gate Park.

Golden Gate Bridge

See more photos of Rocco’s incredible LEGO Golden Gate Bridge on Flickr.

The (building) force is strong with this one: an interview with Amado Canlas Pinlac [Interview]

Our continuing adventures led us to track down and interrogate Amado Canlas Pinlac (aka AC Pin). Amado was born in Angeles City in the Philippines, and works in the Information Technology field with previous employment with overseas airlines. He has called East Brunswick, New Jersey home for the last fifteen years, where he lives with his wife Marleth and their three sons, Milton, Marlowe and Myreon. Amado credits the support of his wife for being where he is today!

Strike the pose!

TBB: Can you tell us how you got into LEGO?

AC: First and foremost I’ve been a Star Wars fan/geek way before LEGO introduced the SW line, as I collected the Star Wars action figures, vehicles, and sets. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise for those who’ve known me over the years that I love to build Star Wars dioramas. In fact I’ve done Action Figure dioramas and was affiliated with various SW fan sites which featured them before I even started with LEGO. One of the problems/drawbacks that I’ve had to contend with the Action Figure dioramas was there was very little or none of the re-usability factor. Around that time, when I was growing disinterested with Action Figures, LEGO started producing the first SW sets.

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Your favourite band is now playing at Hardy Nilsson Arena

You will not find Hardy Nilsson Arena in real life as this building comes directly from the creative mind of Nybohov Creation Ltd. Hardy Nilsson is a retired Swedish ice hockey player and coach, and this fantastic microscale arena has been named after him. The shaping of the building is both unusual and eye-catching. Both the curvaceous walls and wavy corners of the roof are beautifully designed. The colour scheme gives a 70s retro feel that I love. How easy would this arena be to spot in a busy city?

Hardy Nilsson Arena

As with all microscale scenes, the ingenuity of parts use is often found in the small details. The builder demonstrates a lovely array of microscale flora in the landscape with at least four different types of tree. The billboard lights made from telephone handsets look perfect, while the microscale traffic in the streets surrounding the arena really set the scene.

Hardy Nilsson Arena

I’m gonna pick up the pieces and build a LEGO house

Mini Modular’s are brilliant when you can’t afford the full-sized thing. Clearly inspired by the new LEGO House under construction in Billund, Chris Wight has created a perfect addition with his LEGO House 2. I love the blocky layered design and the brilliant choice of colors. Little details like the air-conditioning unit on the roof and the simple tiled sidewalk with perfect mini trees all serve to round out the creation and give it a lived-in feel.

Lego House 2

It looks great sitting between the Mini Modular Fire Station and Cafe Corner:

Lego House 2

A perfect reflection: the Taj Mahal in microscale

India’s most famous piece of architecture is also the world’s most famous mausoleum and the final resting place of Mumtaz Mahal, a 17th-century empress consort. Builder Brick Point brings us a lovely microscale LEGO rendition complete with the tomb and its surrounding grounds, including the long reflecting pool in front.

Taj Mahal

And if you want to see how the builder created this, they’ve made an excellent 55-second time-lapse video of the construction showing the process layer by layer.

When steam powered a revolution

The Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the late 1700s and saw a shift from manufacturing within people’s homes, using hand tools or basic machines, to powered machinery, factories, and mass production. Factories and steam locomotives were signature developments of the times. Toltomeja has used both of these icons of the industrial revolution in his LEGO diorama. There’s a large factory with tall chimneys emitting clouds of smoke (the part used is the cloth spider’s net) and a steam train loaded with coal. The bridge and the factory are very nicely put together, but it was the brick-built lettering and the little horses and carts that really caught my eye.

Industrial Revolution

The steam locomotive is cleverly built at this scale, using a telephone handset as the coupling rod connecting the drive wheels, while a few treasure chests become the open wagons containing coal.

Industrial Revolution