Tag Archives: China

One of the world’s oldest cultures, China has given the world everything from fireworks to pasta. The culture and history of the “Middle Kingdom” continue to inspire LEGO builders all across the globe.

LEGO to open its second Flagship Store in Shanghai, China [News]

The first Flagship store opened in Disney Resort in Shanghai back in May 2016 and was the largest LEGO Brand store in the world back in its opening. 2 years later, The LEGO Group has announced its second store scheduled to open in Autumn (end of the year) at Shanghai ShiMao Festival City in People’s Square located in the heart of the city. The new store is expected to be slightly more than half the size of the Disney Resort Store at 6297 sq feet (585 square meters) over two floors. In comparison, the first store was around 10,764 sq feet spread (1,000 square metres)  over two floors.

Last year, the Shanghai Skyline LEGO Architecture skyline was revealed and with this new store in place, it is another stepping stone for LEGO’s growth in China. Read our review of the Shanghai skyline here.

LEGO-China-Flagship-Store

Click here to read the full press release

Tianfeng Pagoda stands tall in history

The Tianfeng Pagoda is situated in the centre of Ningbo City, Zhejiang Province. With a height of about 167 feet, this hexagonal building is an ancient landmark within the city. It was named after the time period it was built, between Tiancewansui (reign title of Empress Wu Zetian AD 695) and Wansuidengfeng (reign title of Empress Wu Zetian AD 696) in Tang Dynasty. Tianfeng Pagoda’s hexagonal shape has been beautifully captured in LEGO by qian yj and the 7 levels of pagoda are almost as impressive in LEGO.

Tianfeng Tower legoMOC

This LEGO version sits peacefully in a park with trees, gardens and even a small pond. While Tianfeng Pagoda does sit in Tianfeng park, it represents the fusion of history and present day as the actual tower is located next to a shopping mall and bustling streets cross just beyond the park.

The beauty of architecture in defence

Chinese city walls were built for defense, to protect towns and cities in China. Part of those walls included towers and gates which typically served as entry points. This particular Gate Tower built by Prince Jiang is astounding in size and amazing in architecture. I’m always in awe of how a structure meant to be a defence mechanism can also be made to look so appealing even in real life structures you see around historic China.

Click to see more

Ancient town of Huizhou

The latest Chinese architectural wonder by qian yj depicts an old residential building in the city of Huizhou. The tall white walls enclose an intimate courtyard surrounded by ornate two-storey wooden houses. The scene is set amidst narrow canals interlaced with quaint sidewalks. Who wouldn’t want to take a vacation in such a poetic destination?

Chinese architecture-the Huizhou-style folk dwelling houses

Illustrating culture with LEGO

ArzLan shows us there is beauty in simplicity with this stunning build. Included are various representations of Chinese culture, with a seated figure playing the Ehru (a two-stringed fiddle). Also pictured is a Go board, and supplies for calligraphy and painting.

There are a number of eye catching things here; the seated figure stands out in bright red, and the scroll background has brick-built calligraphy.

I particularly love the dragon brush holder. It’s so fragile and perfectly executed.

琴棋書畫

A belated dragon dance for Chinese New Year

Finnish builder Eero Okkonen admits that he’s not sure why he built this Chinese dragon dance scene (several months after the Lunar New Year), but I for one am very glad he did. With stellar use of transparent Bionicle flame pieces and a Ninjago “Dragon God” banner tile, I can almost hear the firecrackers and smell the smoke.

Dragon Dance

You can read more from the builder himself on his blog, Cyclopic Bricks.

Happy Year of the Monkey 2016!

Today is Chinese New Year, celebrated around the world by people from many different countries. According to the Chinese Zodiac, this is now the Year of the Monkey, so LEGO builders have been posting a plethora of simian creations in honor of our cousins.

Many of the LEGO models feature Sun Wukong, the Monkey King hero of the Chinese epic Journey to the West (and its many adaptations for film and TV). Donna Liem puts the iconic hero astride a cloud in the sky.

Gong Xi Fa Chai...

Click through for more monkey madness!

This is the house that Alanboar built

This week Hong Kong hosted its gigantic annual fan convention Ani-Com, an event that makes San Diego Comic Con look like a book club meeting at a Starbucks. Local builder Alanboar Cheung was a finalist in the show’s LEGO building contest, with this delightful and very stylish “Dream House”:

This thing is packed to overflowing with awesome details – the closeups are definitely worth a look.

This event always produces some stellar MOCs, but information is a bit hard to come by. We’ll show you more of them as they come across our radars.

Playable Go board built from LEGO

As a small child back in Japan, I used Go pieces to create serpentine roads across tatami floors for my little Tomica cars, but my family left Japan before I ever played a proper game. I still get nostalgic whenever I see Go games. Joe Miller built this fully functional 9×9 Go set completely from LEGO, using some rather complicated techniques to place the black lines on the board.

9x9 Go Board

The lines themselves are the tops of 1×2 half-panels wedged into full (3-brick high) panels, combined with some serious sideways and upside-down (SNOT) construction.

9x9 Go Board Construction

Amazingly life-like LEGO sculpture of the Monkey King (孫悟空)

Tyler Halliwell is best known to our regular readers as a creator of amazing LEGO busts. So his latest work – depicting the Monkey King of Chinese mythology – is an ambitious departure in terms of its size and construction. We think you’ll agree that the attention to detail and the naturalness of this figure’s clothing and facial expression are completely mind-blowing!

We journeyed for several months across the Asian subcontinent, rescuing helpless villagers from all manner of demons along the way, to visit the mountain in which Tyler has been imprisoned for the past 500 years, so we could find out more about this creation…

BB: So how many hours and how many bricks went into this creation?

TH: That’s tough to estimate, but probably about 100 hours over the past two months, with most of it coming into shape in the past two weeks. There’s less pieces than you’d think, as it’s mostly hollow but for a technic frame. So if I had to guess, I would say around 1500 bricks.

BB: What inspired you to choose the Monkey King as the subject of your latest LEGO sculpture?

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“Of all the noises known to man, opera is the most expensive” (Molière)

At the end of this month, some 150,000 people will cram themselves into the San Diego convention center to attend San Diego Comic-Con (SDCC). Meanwhile, on the other side of the Pacific about five times that number will be attending Ani-Com (ACGHK) at the Hong Kong Convention Center.

LEGO fans are well catered for at ACGHK, and the members of HKLUG always put on a good show. TKH has taken a break from his usual Anime style builds to create this amazing tribute to Cantonese opera especially for the event…

Pictured here in breathtaking detail and accuracy are two classic historical characters from the genre: the scheming bureaucrat Cao Cao, and the heroic General Guan Yu. If you’re not sure which is which, I’ll give you a hint: Like almost every detail in a Chinese opera, the color of the actors’ masks is highly symbolic. But the color code is the opposite to what Westerners might expect ;-)