Tag Archives: Art

Some LEGO builders elevate the form to fine art in its own right, while others enjoy reproducing famous works of art with the brick. Find beautiful and thought-provoking LEGO artwork right here.

Cool cubism

Here’s a wonderful geometric creation from Wami Delthorn. LEGO lends itself perfectly to these sort of repeating-pattern artistic constructions — it’s a shame we don’t see more of them.

Lego Cube Pattern

If you look at the center of this image for long enough it starts to flip back and forth in a good example of the Necker Cube illusion. I could stare at this thing all day!

French artist builds huge metal LEGO minifigures that are completely poseable

Ever wanted a giant LEGO minifigure? French artist Mat Green, who specializes in welding, decided to put his considerable metal-working skills to use crafting these remarkably accurate renditions of a LEGO minifigure and a LEGO skeleton. Mat tells us it took him two months to craft the minifigure, whom he’s named Hugo. Hugo weighs 110 pounds and stands over four feet tall. The coolest thing about Hugo though, is that he’s just as poseable as his plastic siblings. Mat then created Pablo, whom he says is a Mexican punk rocker skeleton. Pablo weighs 130 pounds, and comes with a removable Mohawk.

See more of Hugo and Pablo

Enter the brick outpost

Cole Blaq continues his series of fascinating artistic takes on a scaled up 2×4 brick, called Enter The Brick, with a Classic Space themed brick. This one is one of my favorites in the series. While I’m not nostalgic for the theme since it was well before my time, I enjoy the simplicity of the build, much like the sets in the Classic Space era. One of the studs propped up as a satellite dish is just the right amount of detail.

Out Post

Build your cake and eat it too

Sometimes LEGO looks good enough to eat, and this is certainly the case with Sad Brick‘s Cranberry Black Forest cake. This plastic take on the classic German desert appears to have the key ingredients of chocolate sponge, cream, kirsch, more cream and a black cherry on top. A puzzle for you: do you know which part has been used to depict the cherry?

Cranberry Black Forest Cake

The best part is that this cake is definitely fat-free.

Peace, LEGO, Unity and Respect

Nostalgic for the “gabber” electronic dance music scene of 1990’s Netherlands, Dutch builder Chris van Vliet built this amazing three-dimensional LEGO recreation the Masters of Hardcore logo (a record label and series of EDM festivals). The sculpture – which resembles the giant goat skull that used to grace the stage at these events – is comprised almost entirely of LEGO bricks kept from that era, and has even been beautifully black-lit.

Chris also gives us a couple of extra treats in the form of detailed work in progress photos showing how the entire creation came together, and a short video of two brick-built gabber fans in action! And not satisfied with recreating just one gabber-era logo, Chris even produced this sculpture of the Thunderdome “Thunder Wizzard” logo, which when you compare it to the original is clearly spot on!

 

The Pixel of Zelda: A Sprite to the Past

In computer graphics, a sprite is an image that represents a discrete element. Sprites are sorta like cels from animation: and some older video games swapped out sprites to simulate animation. One such game was the Super Nintendo classic The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. In a way, the pixels in a sprite are like the 1×1 elements in a LEGO mosaic. Genius idea: build sprites with LEGO! My sprites are 3 plates tall, and don’t require baseplates. Here’s our hero Link, lifting the Master Sword.

The Pixel of Zelda: Link

Finding sprite sheets (grids of sprites in a single file, used for animation) on the internet to reference was easy. Finding 1×1 plates in the right colors was hard. Believe it or not, LEGO doesn’t make 1×1 plates in every color. Building Princess Zelda and Ganon was almost as difficult as beating the game.

 

Everything stays right where you left it

Adventure Time, c’mon and grab your friends! We’re off to very distant lands. Lands where cute and quirky vampires like Marceline have complex relationships with Jake, Princess Bubblegum, and even the Ice King. Biczzz started this incredible mosaic as a 2D project, but then ran out of tiles. Solution: upgrade it to a 3D project! I’m glad he ran out of tiles, the depth and layering created by the cheese slopes is quite impressive.

Marceline Mosaic

Yes, I’m sure this is art

Surely you’ve heard of Salvador Dalí, the great Spanish painter known for his vivid surrealist imagery. In 1976, he painted Gala contemplating the Mediterranean Sea which at a distance of 20 meters is transformed into the portrait of Abraham Lincoln, which is not totally unlike our modern “magic eye” drawings. The name may be long and unwieldly, but it’s a very literal description of the painting.

Does it work? Let’s try an experiment. Have a look at Max to the well‘s excellent representation of the painting. You can clearly see a figure standing in the middle of the model, facing away from you. That’s meant to be Gala, Dalí’s wife, staring at the sea. Now, move your chair back, away from your computer. You probably won’t be able to go 20 meters, but you can probably go 5 meters (about 16 feet). Now what do you see? Be honest, it looks a little bit like Abraham Lincoln, doesn’t it?

Gala Contemplating the Mediterranean Sea

You may now return your seat to its regular upright position.

A well-placed illusion

When I saw this sculpture by Chris Maddison, I didn’t think it was possible for all the pieces to be freestanding and connected. Even if supports were used, I couldn’t imagine how they could be Lego parts given the haphazard angles that the cubes were positioned. Even zooming on the photo and examining the gaps between the bricks revealed that each small cube is supposedly made out of a plain 2×2 brick sandwiched between a plate and tile. Just when I (and many others) thought the sculpture was impossible, Chris revealed the solution to this wonderful illusion.

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Beautiful LEGO sculpture glorifies the engineering mindset

Jason Allemann presents a brilliant model built by his partner Kristal — a stunning piece of kinetic sculpture designed to represent what goes on inside the mind of a LEGO engineer.

The Engineer

As a fully-fledged steampunk geek, you can imagine what the video of this creation in action did to me. This is absolute genius — expanding platforms, rising towers, crank-powered electric lighting. Check it out, it’s genuinely brilliant…

This LEGO gallery is a work of art

This fantastic minifig scale art gallery is a creation by Tyler Sky and his wife Frances. The gallery includes both LEGO depictions of actual works of art and some new creations by the builders themselves. Atop the largest floor, you can see a LEGO version of Four Boats Stranded and inside the large window the obvious red square is part of Composition II in Red, Blue and Yellow. The Orca on display in the foreground is definitely one of my favourite parts of this build.

Art Gallery / Museum

The inside of Tyler’s art gallery is worth taking a virtual stroll through. See if you can spot the white croissants used as an internal architectural feature. Don’t miss the tribute to Bob Ross on the first floor balcony; he is standing painting happy little trees.

Self-portrait bust in LEGO bricks

Julius von Brunk built this amazing self-portrait bust in LEGO bricks. There’s great brickwork here, capturing the curves, planes, and lines of a head and face more accurately than you’d expect possible using plastic blocks. But for me, the main attraction is that raised eyebrow. It transforms this from being a cool technical achievement into a genuine portrait with a sense of character.