Tag Archives: Sculpture

It’s hard to define which LEGO models are sculptural and which are just a regular pile of bricks, but we know a good sculpture when we see one — even if it’s a funny cartoon character and not the Venus de Milo.

A picturesque portrait

We see a lot of LEGO models that attempt to create very life-like scenes seen through an almost documentarian lens. Rarer, however, is the build that takes a more artistic approach, such as this pair of ballet dancers by Nicolas PICOT. Using a flat style with lots of curved bricks across a few planes of depth, Nicolas has emulated a photograph, and the dancers’ frozen-in-motion pose is conveyed perfectly.

Les Danseurs 1

65 Million bricks in the making

“Before you even knew what you had, you designed it, and built it, and slapped it on a plastic baseplate…”
-Ian Malcolm (not really)

A new Jurassic World film is on the way, and ZiO Chao is celebrating with a set of busts of some of the most iconic dinosaurs from the franchise. ZiO built his model for Rebrick’s “Iconically Jurassic World” contest (now closed). Each dinosaur’s head is depicted with a 3-dimensional profile view, with the following prehistoric beasts being represented….

JURASSIC WORLD icon

See all of the LEGO dinosaurs up close!

Around the world in 80 studs

These mosaic sculptures by ZiO Chao have so much depth, they’re bordering on bas-relief. We’ve shared ZiO Chao’s landmark sculptures before, and he is back at it again and is ready to take us on a trip around the world with a series of 3D mosaics.

Click to continue touring the world with the rest of the mosaics

We’re mesmerized watching Luke dodge Vader in this Death Star trench run kinetic sculpture [Video]

We recently featured a World War I dogfight kinetic sculpture by Jason from JK Brickworks. In his video, Jason promised to share variations on the theme, and he’s done so with this fantastic trench run scene from A New Hope. The little starfighters and greebly Death Star surface are excellent in their own right, but the movement takes this LEGO creation to the next level.

Trench Run

The video shows Luke’s X-wing evading Darth Vader’s TIE fighter, with turbolaser turrets swinging back and forth as well. Jason also takes the kinetic sculpture apart to explain how he added the extra motion for the turbolaser emplacements.

Who....Who....Who can make an amazing owl?

Chungpo Cheng, that’s who! You might remember Chungpo’s work from a few weeks ago when we shared his stunning, super-sized Star Wars battle droidsThis time, he chose to make big versions of the classic LEGO owl, rat and “cheese slope” elements. In particular, the owl is packed with lots of personality. Those big eyes and upturned eyebrows make Chungpo’s owl look warm and approachable. I almost want to hand-feed the little guy some birdseed!

Owl, Rounded Features 40232

Chungpo has sculpted an excellent likeness of the original owl piece. He has even photographed the two side-by-side for comparison. Continue reading

When made out of LEGO bricks you are, look as good, you will not, hmmm?

Large LEGO sculptures made out of mostly regular bricks are most commonly created by LEGO itself for promotional displays, but fan builders sometimes make their own too. Felix Jaensch has done just that with this great rendition of Yoda, which instantly reminds us of the old 7194 Yoda UCS set.

Yoda

There’s a lot of good shaping here, especially because a large percent of the character is a robe, which you can see better in this shot of Yoda’s back.

Yoda

Beef up your building

Organic shapes are surely some of the hardest to capture in LEGO bricks — leaving many builders to concentrate their efforts on structures and vehicles rather than animal forms. However, Joe Perez seems to be up for the challenge — his latest model is a lifelike and intimidating bull on the charge. The shaping is excellent here, with slightly exaggerated proportions that effectively convey a genuine sense of heft and menace.

Charging Bull

Joe has been slowly putting together an impressive series of creatures in this style. Don’t miss the excellent brick-built stallion we featured a few years ago, and this wonderful stag…

Stag

65,000 bricks at 88 miles per hour: The world’s biggest LEGO DeLorean from Back to the Future

While this LEGO recreation of the famous Back to the Future DeLorean time machine may not be the scientific breakthrough a real time machine would be, it most definitely is a great artistic feat. After being granted rights by NBC Universal, Ryan McNaught assembled a team to build this near-perfect version of the DeLorean from the first film out of 65,143 bricks.

LEGO® Brick Back to the Future DeLorean

Continue reading

LEGO swan is clearly beautiful

This transparent swan sculpture by alanboar makes for a beautiful LEGO creation. Don’t underestimate the challenge the construction must have posed, despite the lack of complicated techniques on display — the relative scarcity of bricks and plates in trans-clear will have made it much more complicated than you might imagine. The sideways-built blue base adds a welcome contrast and allows the uplit sculpture to really shine.

LEGO Swan Lake

The Supreme Commander of the Imperial Forces is heading this way

Darth Vader is probably one of the most iconic fictional villains. Constantinos and Petros Nicolaou have built their own life-sized LEGO version of Darth Vader’s head. The brothers used 2712 bricks to construct the head of Darth Vader, complete with his instantly recognisable helmet with its triangular breathing apparatus.  Building mainly in black is usually a trademark for Batman, but the brothers used curved and straight edge slopes to sculpt a great many details, despite the limited colour scheme.

I think this would be an ideal sculpture to be displayed in the hallway of your home, if you enjoy frightening visitors.

Oil is the lifeblood of the earth

Black gold, some call it. This striking piece by timofey_tkachev shows how humanity has drunk this precious resource at an astonishing rate since we discovered its multitude of uses, and with each new miracle we welcomed, an array of troubles followed. From the blazing infernos of uncapped wells to the broken pipelines polluting the ground, Timofey paints a picture of the horror of human technology run amok.

1 And there will be bloodThe face of an unknown abomination drenched in black oil springs from the ground beneath the hellish landscape. In the foreground, a streak of oil seeps toward a lighter, inching closer to Armageddon.

6 And there will be blood

What colour of gumball will you chews?

Gumball machines first appeared around 1907, although there were a few other types of vending machine for sticks of gum a couple of decades earlier. Bruce Lowell is not the first to create a LEGO gumball machine but his design is the most proportional, accurate and adorable version we have encountered. The globe utilises the gyrosphere parts that first appeared within Jurassic World, while the key from the Clockwork Robot minifigure is perfect as the turning mechanism.

Gumball Machine