About Jennifer

Jennifer Spencer received her very first LEGO set, 6419: Rolling Acres Ranch, at age six. But she found the instructions far too complicated and so she forced her father to build (and rebuild) the set for her. He must have grown weary of looking at that instruction booklet because Jennifer did not receive another LEGO set for several years. Jennifer builds her own sets now. She has been active in the online LEGO community since 2011 when she first discovered The Brothers Brick. She’s also a member of her local LEGO users group, NEOLug. You can check out her original LEGO creations on Flickr.

Posts by Jennifer

LEGO Niantic logo

A Pokemon trainer from northeast Ohio named Adrian Drake recently took a break from sneaking up on squirtles and evolving his eevees. What did he do with his spare time? He built the Niantic logo out of LEGO bricks, of course!

Niantic

If you’ve played any Ingress or Pokemon Go (and seriously, who hasn’t?), you’ll probably recognize this hot air balloon that also kinda looks like an atom carrying a ship. But even if you don’t recognize the Niantic logo, you have to admit Adrian’s 3D LEGO version is pretty sweet.

We can rebuild him, we have the technology

Thank goodness Eero Okkonen had the incredible foresight to rebuild this lizard beast. After all, there aren’t that many Tyrannosaurus Rexes left in the wild! Using ABS plastic and discarded Bionicle technology, Eero was able to piece together all that remained of this once-great creature (including his Duplo grass spine and even the very tip of his tail) and transform him into a six million dollar dino.

CMT-Rex

The LEGO Batman Movie 70900 The Joker Balloon Escape [Review]

The LEGO Batman Movie has been out for over a month and it’s still going strong in the weekend box office sales race. Last week, for example, it was the fifth highest grossing film of the weekend. Not too shabby for a kids movie featuring LEGO minifigures.

By now, most of you have probably picked up a few of the LEGO Batman Movie sets (or at least eye-balled the back of the boxes in the store). And while we here at the Brothers Brick have already reviewed many sets from this line, there are still a couple of LEGO Batman Movie sets that we haven’t looked at yet. Here’s a look at one of the entry-level sets…

Joker Balloon Escape [70900] retails for $14.99 and contains 124 pieces. At LEGO’s standard price of $0.10 per piece, this small set may be slightly overpriced. However, since it contains two minifigures and some new, useful parts, many Batman fans may choose to overlook that fact.

The main components are the two minifigures, a power plant console, a comically over-complicated bomb, and the Joker’s balloon pack. There’s also a play feature where the two halves of the tank break away from each other, simulating a bomb explosion. (You know, just in case Batman doesn’t make it in time.)

Interestingly, this set can combine with Mr. Freeze Ice Attack [70901] and Scarecrow Special Delivery Vehicle [70910] to form a mega-set: the Gotham power plant featured in the beginning of the movie.

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Massive LEGO McWane Science Center

Residents of Birmingham, Alabama will surely recognize this creation by Wesley Higgins. It’s the McWane Science Center, a real-life building in Birmingham that’s been transformed into a place where minifig families can spend an afternoon learning about science.

LEGO McWane Science Center

The focal point of this LEGO creation is the Science Center’s iconic mosaic-like rotunda. But Wesley’s version includes the entire building including furnished interiors and even a parking garage. Wesley says it took 12 months to complete the LEGO McWane Science Center and he spent a lot of time working on it while simultaneously watching television with his family.

LEGO McWane Science Center - Dinosaur FossilsLEGO McWane Science Center

If you happen to be in the Birmingham area, you can see Wesley’s creation in real life! It’s currently on display at the McWane Science Center and there’s even a contest to guess the total number of bricks in the creation. Pretty neat, right?

LEGO McWane Science Center Alabama NewsCenter Article

Aaahh!!! Real LEGO Monsters

As any child of the 1990s (or their parents) can tell you, Nickelodeon television shows were simply the best. And Aaahh!!! Real Monsters is right up at the top of the list of best cartoons from that decade. And judging by this terrific LEGO version of Krumm, it seems that Julius von Brunk agrees with me. Just look at Krumm’s signature armpit hairs (so stinky), his blue lips (terrifying), and his hand-held eyeballs (where will he roll them next?).

Krumm

Here’s hoping Ickis and Oblina are right around the corner (or hiding under Julius’s bed).

LEGO Enfield RLUG Workshop [News]

Last month, I had the chance to visit the LEGO offices in Enfield, Connecticut. How’d I snag such a sweet opportunity you may ask? Well, the LEGO AFOL Relations & Programs team (aka the “AR&P team”) issued a general invitation to sites like The Brothers Brick as well as to United States RLUG members to participate in a workshop. Unsurprisingly, the workshop spaces filled up in less than 24 hours.

Enfield RLUG Workshop Group Photo

Enfield LEGO Compass HouseI and 33 other lucky AFOLs got to sneak a peek inside LEGO’s U.S. headquarters and participate in several discussions about LEGO’s community outreach programs. In total, the workshop participants hailed from nine different RLUGs, including QueLUG, WMLUG, NEOLUG, TexLUG, MichLUG, NELUG, ConnLUG, RLUG, and PennLUG.

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Someone will come along

Someone HAS come along. If you’re still on the fence about whether or not to see Logan, perhaps this stunning LEGO scene by Andrew Cookston will convince you to head to the theater.

“So this is what it feels like...”

“I hurt myself today... to see if I still feel...”

Nature made me a freak. Man made me a weapon. And God made it last too long.

I don’t want to spoil the film, but I’ll say that it has beautiful cinematography and an emotional storyline. Unlike the typical superhero film, however, it might be too gory for young viewers. (It is rated R after all).

Andrew’s LEGO scene (and his teaser image to the left) captures the somber tone of the film. I love the forced perspective created by the rocky terrain and the power lines. The muted color palette and the stoic minifigures are perfection.

We launch at first light

Sometimes amazing LEGO creations are elevated to outright works of art. All it takes is a stunning background and immaculate lighting. This photo of Tim Goddard‘s simple little blue shuttle and his not-so-simple “Nexagon” launch platform looks like it could find a ready home in a museum.

Nexagon landscape

Tim built this creation for the NEXOGON, a parts festival hosted by New Elementary for the new NEXO Knight combo power shield. It’s a strange new piece that probably has more uses than we might expect. Tim used the part as the center of his landing pad, resulting in a cool triangular shape.

Outrunning the competition

This neon netrunner by Carter Baldwin is one part nostalgic 80s racing video game (think Out Run), one part Blade Runner, and one part experiment in color theory. Mix that all up and you’ve got one sweet LEGO speed machine. While the speeder bike itself is quite good, what at really makes this build pop is the background. I love the glowing, misting water, the ombre-effect wall, the exposed beams, and that trans-blue palm tree.

NetRunner

If you give a mouse a speeder bike...

Crossing the LEGO wasteland is deadly for the unprepared. But this little speeder-biking mouse by Adam Dodge looks ready for the long haul. His bike is sleek underneath all that clutter and he’s even packing a boom-box for road trip music. (A Horse with No Name anyone?)

MMR

Overall Adam’s build has a dusty, apocalyptic feel. However, the sparse pops of color and the adorable mouse head (It’s a custom Mouse Guard head) give his creation a lighthearted feeling too.

The LEGO Batman Movie 70901 Mr. Freeze Ice Attack [Review]

What killed the dinosaurs? The Ice Age! Whether you love him for his puns or hate him for the same reason, Mr. Freeze is an excellent counterpoint to the broody Bat of Gotham. So buckle up readers and get nostalgic for icy puns because it’s time to review Mr. Freeze Ice Attack (Set 70901).

This set retails for $19.99 and has 201 pieces. Based on LEGO’s standard pricing of $0.10 per piece, this price tag is pretty much spot on. It comes with three minifigs (Batman, Mr. Freeze, and a Security Guard), Mr. Freeze’s Exosuit, a power plant console, and a minifig-sized chunk of ice. Interestingly, this set combines with two other new Batman sets: 70900 The Joker Balloon Escape and 70910 Scarecrow Special Delivery. The end result is a mega-set that looks like the power station from the opening scene of the LEGO Batman Movie. Pretty nifty, right?

Read the full review after the jump

Remember kids, brush your LEGO teeth at least twice a day

I can only assume that Chris Maddison takes excellent care of his LEGO teeth because these chompers appear quite healthy! Just look at those pearly whites (modified 2×3 pentagonal tiles). Firm-looking rosy gums and not a cavity in sight! (I bet money he even flosses.)

They Just Won't Shut Up!

The best part about these LEGO teeth is that they even chatter like the wind-up plastic toy Chris’s design was based on. Check out the video below to see for yourself.