Tag Archives: Scenery

On the shores of the sea comes the end of our fellowship in Middle-Earth

The bittersweet ending of The Lord of the Rings is a scene that impacted many readers and viewers such as myself. It is the last we see of our beloved heroes after so many trials and tribulations in their story. In this scene, our heroes join the elves on a boat departing Middle-Earth to “a far green country under a swift sunrise.” Many see this as an allegory for death and the journey beyond, whether it be heaven or something else. Like Bilbo, I like to think of this in a more optimistic way: a new adventure in an unfamiliar land. JNJ Bricks captured the moment in the Grey Havens right before their departure in a striking, immersive LEGO scene.

Grey Havens

The minifigures of Frodo, Gandalf, and the hobbits stand in the foreground, out of focus and facing away. The elves wait by the boat, ready to take them on their journey out of the completely brick-built harbour. LEGO parts make up everything in this scene, from the water to the sunset sky between the cliffs. My favourite detail, the arches, and towers across the water look just like the movie, despite being so small. The boat, being grey, is distinct enough to not blend into the background. The accuracy of this scene invokes the same emotion in me as I experience while reading the book or watching the movie. Now I am in the mood for some of Tolkien’s poetry…

A visual feast for a weary traveller

This colorful creation by Jake Hansen (Mountain Hobbit) jumped right out at me with the inviting use of colors that spellbind and luring me to a place where it’s mystical that I almost want to drive right into the canvas of LEGO bricks of which it’s sculpted with. The imagery is vertically split into three: the cool flowing blue of the waterfall streaming, the dark orange earth that paves the path to the hidden abode, and the muted green of the grass work in a perfect combination of something that seemed like it spun off an artist’s color wheel. The equally bright and random colors mushrooms fitted with various sizes of technic gears in tan bring the magical land to life.

Preston the Potion Master

This wild Mustang is the Boss of the canyon

Collaborative building projects can yield amazing results, such as this slick 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302 overlooking a picturesque cliff. The bright red Mustang was built by ham_MOC, while the cliff was built by Jonathan S. If you didn’t know this was a collaboration, you might think everything was made by one person. That’s because the two builds pair nicely, complete with advanced coloring techniques like the Mustang’s two-tone exterior and the layering of colors on the cliff. It makes for a cohesive build that couples American muscle with the beauty of the American West.

The Open Road

The two builders built this colorful vignette for the LEGO Ideas contest, “Celebrate your favorite Ford Mustang in a beautiful scenery!”

Field of LEGO dreams

Here’s a pretty LEGO view — a daisy-strewn meadow with a brick-built backdrop. Hans Demol built this mosaic for a display with his local LEGO group. Mosaics are not usually my favourite kind of LEGO building, but the addition of the strip at the front with the daisies elevated this into something more interesting than a simple rendition of a pixelated image. It would be even better if some of the varied green shades in the backdrop’s “grass” had continued forward over the base, but that’s nitpicking at an otherwise lovely design.

LEGO Mosaic: Landscape

A monument to all your sins

Smart parts and color usage unite in a LEGO totem pole pieced together by Jonas Kramm. The reversed dark red horse armor on the head of the symbolic structure is my favorite parts usage here. Though the focus of the scene is the pole itself, the base of the pole and skeleton setting the scene are notable additions.

Totem Pole

Walking through the valley of death

Finding yourself in a middle of lifeless desert during a crimson sunset is probably one of my biggest fears. Thanks, vir-a-cocha, for illustrating it! But honestly, this scenery looks amazingly cinematic. Even thought it’s just a vast empty desert, there are so many things to spy, like the skull near a lovely cactus or the smooth transition between the foreground and the background via forced perspective. Fading sky is absolutely the best way to complete this masterpiece.

Mexico

Grand designs

Patrick Massey builds great fantasy environments, then stocks them with entire armies of figures. But like the landscape we featured previously, much of his scenery is so gorgeous that it demands to be enjoyed unpopulated as well, to appreciate all the little details. Fortunately Patrick seems to feel the same way. The result: pure LEGO scene-porn!