Tag Archives: Scene

Immerse yourself in an awe-inspiring auto repair shop

Some of us here at the Brothers Brick are big fans of car builds. Yet, every good car needs an equally good auto repair shop to continue running, and this LEGO scene built by Ben Pitchford fits the bill. It has all the tools to get your motor running and on the highway. You can even beef up your favorite ride with the monster of an engine peeking out from the right. Best of all, everything is framed within an immersive, self-contained image. Columns and beams extending forward make you feel like you’re a part of the crew, so much so that you can almost smell the gasoline.

Auto Repair Shop

In space, no one can hear you scream

These Cryo Pods built by Peter Reid evoke the eerie feeling of Ridley Scott’s Alien hiding in the corner ready to pounce. The abundant use of grey paired with dramatic lighting gives off the feelings of being far away from earth and long travel in cold reaches of space. The scene is built with almost no LEGO studs visible, which also tricks our minds to believe that this could be larger than what it actually is — at first glance almost close to a movie-scale prop.

Cryo Pods

The great escape of Eleven and the gang

If there’s one scene that stands out from Stranger Things, this has got to be it. In a plot twist where one would have thought that the bicycles would take flight, instead we had a lovely surprise. With this, the Duffer Brothers wrote the 80s Chevy Van right into movie-making history books by making it fly in this epic escape scene. I’ve got to hand it to Andrea Lattanzio in showing that a great scene can be brought to life with the simplest builds, just with LEGO parts on hand.

Stranger Things | Chevy Van

Transparency in business

Builders tackle the LEGO Castle so often, I sometimes wonder if it has been completely exhausted. At times like that, builders such as Jonas Wide prove me wrong. When people move away from the military aspect of castle, they can find an endless well of inspiration beyond just castles and battles.

Glass Works in Barqa

This glass-blowing workshop scene is as much artful photography as it is a LEGO build. The lighting through the windows and from the kiln is quite immersive, and the build itself is not bad at all. The textures on the walls are just enough and the tiles on the floor use related colours that actually look like variable clay bricks. What I really love is the attention to detail with the minifigs – a little drop of sweat on a minifig’s face is enough to show just how hot the workshop must be.

Home grown, healthy and fresh

If you haven’t had your daily dose of vitamins yet, this creation by alego alego might satisfy your needs — provided you can digest ABS plastic, of course. There is anything you could wish for in this fruit and vegetable stand, from peppers to onions, eggplants and lettuce.

BPChallenge

What is a street stand without a street? The background scene is detailed and realistic, with ingot tiles as bricks on the house and a kitty looking out the window. The hydrant and candelabra help the sidewalk avoid being plain or empty. Obviously the vegetable stand is the best part, with all sorts of unique parts uses, like joker’s hair as lettuce and frogs as peppers. Minifig arms are used all around as various fruits and vegetables in different colours – eggplants, chili peppers, bananas…

Score Internet points on a dull life

Framed in just the right way, any life can seem interesting on social media, as shown in a LEGO scene by Arnaud B. The build and shot are quite clever in this artistic social commentary, with the phone frame hiding the seams between grayscale “real life” and full color “Instagram-filtered life” perfectly.

Selfie Life

Get well soon buddy!

Builds by Martin Redfern have a signature style, even when the main feature is not an object but just characters. These types of build, using what looks like very simple techniques and common colours, remind me of how powerful LEGO bricks are as a medium.

A gift for the ward.

Martin had a stroke 3 weeks ago and this is his comeback piece, to be gifted to the folks that took care of him during his recovery at the hospital. Martin, from the team at TBB and the LEGO community, we’re glad to see you’re building again, and we wish you a speedy recovery!

Where there is light, there is life, or perhaps death?

Builder why.not? is an enigmatic LEGO artist. Every build is of his makes you think and wonder what inspired the creation. This particular scene was cleverly crafted with an assortment of tubes and technic pins to give an organic shape to a lifeless tree. Bringing hope to a desolate and dry world is a bright coloured green apple – a sign of life and hope when it looks like everything else is without hope. The provoking mystery is the light behind sharp-edged rocks. Is that hope by the light of a rising sun, or is that an explosion of  weapon of wars threatening all life?

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TBB Cover Photo for September 2018: Bricktychon – The Wood Tryptichon

The TBB Cover Photo for September 2018 is this beautiful triptych (a fancy word for a picture or carving featuring three panels side by side), which shows the journey of wood during medieval times, from logging through cutting and use in a large building. The photo is a collaboration between three builders: Travis Brickle, who built the forest, Simon NH, who built the sawmill, and Ralph Langer, who built the medieval construction scene. While each of the builds is stunning in its own right, the builders did an excellent job coordinating their photography and build styles to create a trifecta of creations that tells a simple yet charming story.

Bricktychon - The Wood Tryptichon

Want to see your own LEGO creation featured across TBB social media for a month? Then read the submission guidelines and submit your photo today. Photos that do not meet the submission guidelines will not be considered, and will be removed from the group.

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My sensors are not picking up anything. Where do we go now?

My head hurts in a good way while looking at this intriguing build by Sheo. There’s so much to look at more closely to figure out how the flooring tessellation effect was achieved. The walls are an especially enigmatic and puzzling construction with a smooth look that belies its complexity. What also makes this scene great is how the structured hard-edged build, which looks like it came out of a sci-fi world, is also laced with tentacles, and various other organic odds and ends such as claws to add some life to the scene.

Let's split up!

The backdrop certainly does steal the limelight, but the seemingly lost droids still deserve a callout for all the interesting parts they use blend in with the theme. See how many unusual elements you can identify in the droids.

Take it easy for a little while

Everything appears chill and cozy in Heikki M’s LEGO scene of an attic apartment room. The attic implied with the sloped ceiling and the brick wall in the back of the room are top notch techniques in a scene full of fantastic detail to take in. I also appreciate the use of textured bricks in the rug. Is it suggesting a raised texture, or someone who walked through? You decide, but it’s great either way.

Night in the Attic Apartment

Home isn’t always where the heart is...

Had it not been for the clear bright sunshine outside of the doorway, I’d pass this build as something that wasn’t made with LEGO. Builder why.not? provokes our emotions by recreating an unfortunate and desolate abode. The dark roof reeks of an eerie feeling with spiders and cobwebs. The detailing is simply amazing – the cracks on the left of the door aren’t just painted but made up of a cleverly positioned assortment of sloped bricks, and a similar technique makes the words on the other side of the door. Who lives here? Why is it so dark and lifeless?

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The key is the piece of graffiti scrawled across the wall, proclaiming “Hate.” When in the depths of hatred, you close yourself off to the world and fill it with your own refuse. However, there’s always a gleam of hope, through the door. Only by stepping outside can you begin to feel the light.