Tag Archives: Scene

Where there is light, there is life, or perhaps death?

Builder why.not? is an enigmatic LEGO artist. Every build is of his makes you think and wonder what inspired the creation. This particular scene was cleverly crafted with an assortment of tubes and technic pins to give an organic shape to a lifeless tree. Bringing hope to a desolate and dry world is a bright coloured green apple – a sign of life and hope when it looks like everything else is without hope. The provoking mystery is the light behind sharp-edged rocks. Is that hope by the light of a rising sun, or is that an explosion of  weapon of wars threatening all life?

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TBB Cover Photo for September 2018: Bricktychon – The Wood Tryptichon

The TBB Cover Photo for September 2018 is this beautiful triptych (a fancy word for a picture or carving featuring three panels side by side), which shows the journey of wood during medieval times, from logging through cutting and use in a large building. The photo is a collaboration between three builders: Travis Brickle, who built the forest, Simon NH, who built the sawmill, and Ralph Langer, who built the medieval construction scene. While each of the builds is stunning in its own right, the builders did an excellent job coordinating their photography and build styles to create a trifecta of creations that tells a simple yet charming story.

Bricktychon - The Wood Tryptichon

Want to see your own LEGO creation featured across TBB social media for a month? Then read the submission guidelines and submit your photo today. Photos that do not meet the submission guidelines will not be considered, and will be removed from the group.

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My sensors are not picking up anything. Where do we go now?

My head hurts in a good way while looking at this intriguing build by Sheo. There’s so much to look at more closely to figure out how the flooring tessellation effect was achieved. The walls are an especially enigmatic and puzzling construction with a smooth look that belies its complexity. What also makes this scene great is how the structured hard-edged build, which looks like it came out of a sci-fi world, is also laced with tentacles, and various other organic odds and ends such as claws to add some life to the scene.

Let's split up!

The backdrop certainly does steal the limelight, but the seemingly lost droids still deserve a callout for all the interesting parts they use blend in with the theme. See how many unusual elements you can identify in the droids.

Take it easy for a little while

Everything appears chill and cozy in Heikki M’s LEGO scene of an attic apartment room. The attic implied with the sloped ceiling and the brick wall in the back of the room are top notch techniques in a scene full of fantastic detail to take in. I also appreciate the use of textured bricks in the rug. Is it suggesting a raised texture, or someone who walked through? You decide, but it’s great either way.

Night in the Attic Apartment

Home isn’t always where the heart is...

Had it not been for the clear bright sunshine outside of the doorway, I’d pass this build as something that wasn’t made with LEGO. Builder why.not? provokes our emotions by recreating an unfortunate and desolate abode. The dark roof reeks of an eerie feeling with spiders and cobwebs. The detailing is simply amazing – the cracks on the left of the door aren’t just painted but made up of a cleverly positioned assortment of sloped bricks, and a similar technique makes the words on the other side of the door. Who lives here? Why is it so dark and lifeless?

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The key is the piece of graffiti scrawled across the wall, proclaiming “Hate.” When in the depths of hatred, you close yourself off to the world and fill it with your own refuse. However, there’s always a gleam of hope, through the door. Only by stepping outside can you begin to feel the light.

Don’t let out a sound, and run for your life

Builder Heikki M. is known for creating very realistic settings of rooms paired with clever photography angles. However, this blood-chilling scene sent a tingle down my spine after one look. A door slightly ajar and a trail of splatter across the floor tiles leaves room for anyone’s imagination to run wild. The visual cues of the grandfather clock past midnight which seems to be missing a pendulum gives it an eerie timestamp of the event taking place.

Oh God, no...

Heikki reassures us that the fake blood is leftover from the last Halloween’s party, but I’m more concerned if the stains are going to come off!

Home of the Brick and Famous

If IKEA ever needs a reference for a builder to lead a creativity department for their recent collaborative announcement with LEGO, I’d nominate Heikki M. in a heartbeat. He has a knack for building and photographing realistic-looking homes that make you take a look at a build twice just to make sure it’s all built with bricks. This particular scene is of a Manor Hall with a grand piano as a central feature. Little details such as the subtle patterns for the cornices give it the subliminal cues of a real home. All we now need is a piano player playing Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata to give life to the room.

Manor Hall

Seems like it’s a long way from home

Artist AdNorrel creates with his brick-strokes a unique composition of a surreal scene with a character making her way through the mountains. The texture of the bricks both below and above the ledge gives off a scary feeling of great heights to the path of this mysterious traveller. The placement of the distant mountains is a nice play with perspectives giving it a larger than life look. If this was my path home from work every day, I’m pretty much sure I wouldn’t get tired of this picturesque journey.

Way through the mountains

The lady in red ain’t dancing with me

There is something mysterious about a build where you’re unable to immediately tell what inspired the builder to create such an enigmatic scene. It seems simple enough, but there’s always a hidden meaning. Even just the title of this build (“Vampires”) left me wondering and compelled me to reach out to the builder, WeNoGrayD to learn more.

Vampires

Keep reading to see more photos and to discover the inspiration behind this creation

Living room design ideas for minifigures

If I were a minifigure living in a LEGO world, I’d hire Finnish builder Heikki M. right off the bat! He has a knack for building realistic-looking indoor scenes that could fool you if you didn’t look close enough, and this is yet another of his amazing constructs. The trick seems to be to keep the lines clean and void of studs (except as intentional texturing) and to include everyday things to make it look as homely as possible. I think I even spotted an Eames Lounge chair with an ottoman with a slightly altered base!

Living Room

Minnie’s Haberdashery from The Hateful Eight in LEGO

As the last place to buy a few essentials or enjoy a good nights sleep before continuing on your journey, Minnie’s Haberdashery is a key location in Quentin Tarantino’s movie,  The Hateful Eight. Marion has built a replica view of the haberdashery in LEGO and it really is an amazing likeness. There are hanging dried herbs and vegetable swaying from the ceiling, a huge assortment of jugs, boxes, barrels, lamps and mugs scattered across tables, shelves and chests of drawers. I love the placement of certain key features; the large beam frames our view to the left and the stool and table are in the forefront with a chest of drawers and open wooden shutters on the right.

The Hateful Eight - Minnie's Haberdashery

Comparison with the actual set from the movie is a must, although Marion has added a few blood spots as we would expect in a Tarantino film.

Photo: Andrew Cooper, SMPSP © 2015 The Weinstein

Log houses never looked this good

In the LEGO creations of today, it seems as though technique is being emphasized more than ever before, especially within the castle genre. It seems as though not a day goes by when I don’t see an innovative way of making an everyday texture. This build by alego alego features a wonderfully designed blacksmith shop, primarily made using various Technic connector parts as individual logs. While I have used one or two of these parts as a single log in my own builds, I never would have conceived of making a whole building out of them, and the result is fantastic.

Cetautomatix’s home

Check out these posts below for more amazing landscaping techniques: