Category Archives: Models

This is what we’re all about. We scour the web for the best custom LEGO models to share with you. From castles and spaceships to planes, trains, and automobiles, you’ll find the best LEGO creations from builders all over the world right here on The Brothers Brick.

Build your office at home

With most of the corporate world working from home these days, it’s easy to miss the cubicle life. You can reminisce about the good old days with this LEGO creation from Tiago Catarino.

LEGO Cubicle

I love the curved desk and the drawers next to the chair. Minimalist is the word that comes to mind in describing how Tiago was able to cram in so many details with so much subtlety. I can’t help but smile at the crooked sticky note. One thing is for sure, when I get out of quarantine and continue working on a scale model of my office, this cubicle is certainly going to be there.

If you’d like to build your own office cubicle, Tiago has provided us the instructions on his YouTube channel.

Stop scrolling and look at this LEGO dragon scroll

Thanks to an ongoing round of Iron Builder, which sees two contestants pitted against each other to build a variety of LEGO models using a specific element, we’ve been seeing an explosion of builds employing the dynamite bundle, from arcade machines to detailed kitchensCecilie Fritzvold, in particular, has been on a roll, sticking that dynamite piece into builds anywhere she can fit it, including into this amazing dragon scroll, where nearly 50 of the bundles make up the twisting body of the beast.

Shenlong

And lest you think Cecilie is cheating by just neatly arranging a bunch of pieces on a tiled baseplate, look very closely and you’ll see that each piece is attached with a clip, meaning you could actually hang this on your wall. Well, except for that brick-built hangar, maybe. The two long black Technic axles that stand in for the string might not be up for the task.

Check out more of Cecilie’s dynamite escapades in our archives: Cecilie Fritzvold LEGO creations

Training for the big times

One of my favorite things to see is when a LEGO builder will revisit a past model and update it. We’ve been watching Tony Sava‘s Dreyfuss Hudson train builds since at least 2008, and this latest iteration is a thing of beauty. New York Central Dreyfuss Hudson with XXL Disc drivers makes use of newer parts like 3x3x2 quarter-domes to enhance the shaping, as well as including some aftermarket pieces like 3D printed Shupps XXL drivers and TrainedBricks connecting rods. I’d also like to mention that the train depot background is just *chef’s kiss* levels of sweet. If it weren’t for the minifigure off to the left, you’d be forgiven for mistaking this for a photo of a real train.

New York Central Dreyfuss Hudson with XXL Disc drivers

If you’d like to learn more about Tony’s builds, check out our interview with him!

This micro LEGO Dwarven mine has upper, lower and middle earth

Just when I think Letranger Absurde can’t surprise me further, they do! This micro build of a Dwarven Mine is spectacular and just dripping with NPU (nice parts use). There’s so much to look at in this small build, but the two things that catch my eye the most are the graveyard up top and the absolutely genius use of minifigure purses as minecarts down below.

Dwarven Mine

I love the combination of sideways and studs-up building and the limited color palette. The large amount of gray tones really makes the other elements stand out. The building detailing is beautiful and the dark tan ground level draws your attention to the middle of the photo, allowing the viewer to take in the upper and lower parts at the same time. The cluster of sand green trees is a nice addition that adds a little more color. The final touch is the wagon, perfectly realized in only three pieces and drawn by a brown frog posing as a dray horse.

Visiting this temple will be sure to bring some heartache

Some movies really tug on your heartstrings, getting you deep in the feels. For nerds out there like me, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom might tug on some heartstrings, too–or at least Mola Ram does. Ha. When I look at this LEGO model built by Henry Tilney, I certainly get the feels. What’s not to like? There is a great representation of some mining carts going down a roller coaster (clearly placed in the film for that amusement park tie-in), and there is Indiana himself, the eminent archaeologist/grave robber Henry Jones, Jr., perched beside a pit of lava. Hopefully he doesn’t end up burning up! Topping it all off is a camel, which doesn’t feature in The Temple of Doom that I recall, but certainly can be found in the final installment of the Indiana Jones trilogy, The Last Crusade.

Mobile Strike Force: ready!

During the pandemic, a group of LEGO fans have begun playing a virtual military conquest game a bit like Risk, except each person’s army consists solely of the creations they build to populate it. Douglas Hughes has mobilized his military in a big way with this absolute unit of a transport plane, which he’s fittingly dubbed “Chubs.” The stylized aesthetics of both the plane and the dock equipment reminds me of the Micro Machines I had as a kid, and I can’t help but want to start playing with this epic transport.

CHU-85 "Chubs" Ekranoplan!

Interestingly, Doug’s sculpted the plane studs-out, which allowed him to get the complex curves the fuselage needs, while still leaving the interior mostly hollow. That would be a difficult balance to strike using other methods, such as stacked slopes.

Star Wars: Now serving Order 66!

The prequels are generally regarded as the least favorites of the Star Wars franchise for many fans. With that said, we can’t deny there were some iconic moments in the films. One such moment; Order 66. That’s when the Galactic Republic was secretly ordered to execute every Jedi they could find–and man that was some edge-of-your-seat stuff! Max Fudal replicates the scene nicely in LEGO and tells us this project took two years and 50,000 pieces to complete. I’d say this was well worth the time and effort. The terrain, from the planet’s liquid core to its craggy cliffs, is astounding. The man-made structures built into the cliffside offer up a change in textures and the minifigures denote plenty of action.

Order 66 on Utapau

I can get lost in all these great details. I just want to play with this scene all day and maybe execute Order 66 myself! Does that make me a bad person? While you’re mulling that over let’s rejoice in the fact that this seems to be the first time we’ve featured this builder here on The Brothers Brick. If this is any indicator, we readily look forward to seeing what else Max is capable of.

Tear it up with these hard suits

Do you like traditional Japanese folklore? Do you like hard suits? Then, by golly, you can set your squeal-holes to positively delighted with this LEGO trio by Louis of Nutwood. The desert hard suit, aka “The Camel” has a strategically placed saw I would not want to tangle with in an alley, dark, or otherwise. The R.A.M.B.O. jungle suit is just the thing to tear it up in the underbrush while the low-temperature suit, known as “The Snowflake”, has a rocket launcher. You know, for the cold. Which is your favorite?

Hard Suits (Shinrai-Do)

Go super fast with this super train

The coolest thing about this LEGO scene by General Sparkle (if that’s your real name!) is the blurred effects cluing us in that this is one fast train. However, the subject matter is well in focus. It’s just a really neat effect. In case the train went by too fast for you, the high ranking military official with the dubious name tells us the cars are as follows: engine, crew, tanker, passenger, passenger, ammunition, passenger, weapon and anti-aircraft gun, heavy equipment flatbed, and more passenger cars. Thank you, General! We’re not even sure if this is a render or an actual LEGO build with some neat photographic trickery. But we are pretty sure this is the first time we’ve featured this builder so let’s hope we see many more cool creations to come. It joins the ranks of so many trains we’ve featured here over the years.

Train

Double the tensegrity, triple the trouble

Over the past few months, LEGO tensegrity sculptures have been all the rage, with their gravity-defying stacking attracting builders of all stripes to try their hands. While most tensegrity structures consist of a single floating element, a few builders have managed to add another floating section to that, which makes the delicate balancing exponentially more difficult. David Roberts makes it look easy, though, with this tower of rings.

The Three RingsTensegrity sculptures stay aloft thanks to being held in tension with three tethers (chains in this case), but David’s model also adds tension to the rings themselves, which simply comprise Technic tread links joined inside out to make a tensioned circle. It all comes together to create a beautifully simple sculpture.

Now, who wants to try their hand at creating a tensegrity sculpture with three floating levels on top of the base? Any takers?

Want to see more tensegrity sculptures? Check out our LEGO Tensegrity archives for examples from tanks to dragons.

Frogger’s Revenge

Builder Cecilie Fritzvold is on a roll with dynamite-based creations lately, and this may be the best one yet. The Strawberry Poison Dynamite Frog dwells deep in the rainforests of IBlandia, or so it’s said. It’s possible that this is just a flight of fancy. It’s possible that adorable little frog isn’t a clever combination of LEGO rubber bands, dynamite, antenna bases, and cherries. Or that the lush greenery of the forest isn’t minifigure palets, capes, grill tiles, and even more dynamite. But I’m not about to venture into the jungle and find out. Better safe than sorry, these days.

Strawberry Poison Dynamite Frog

If you’ve haven’t seen Cecile’s other TNT-centric builds, be sure to check them out!

We’re gonna need a bigger boat!

We all know how this ends. I believe Jaws was the first movie I saw in the theater. Since I was a small child at the time, that speaks of how relaxed they were about letting kids into the theater and…could also explain a lot about how I turned out. The 45th anniversary of this pivotal movie just passed and Arco Noide celebrates with this LEGO version of Quint’s boat. Although Quint is a tough as nails old salt with one of the most memorable intros in movie history, (spoiler alert!) things eventually don’t go well for Quint and his little boat. Still, this is a stunning tribute to the craft. I like how two sets of cattle horns create shark jaws just forward of the ship’s wheel. Judging by the four yellow barrels still present, we have about an hour before things go really sour for Quint. We’re gonna need a bigger boat indeed.

Lego Orca - Jaws' 45th anniversary