Tag Archives: Car

Fighting crime like it’s 1966

Throughout Batman’s illustrious career, he has driven a wide range of Batmobiles — and LEGO fans have built several wonderful representations over the years. While many people might point to the 1989 Batmobile as their favorite, mine would have to be Adam West’s ride from the 1960s Batman TV series. Custom car legend George Barris owned the 1955 Lincoln Futura concept car and modified it into a bat-classic. Therefore, I squealed like a bat with glee when I saw Lucas‘ LEGO version of this iconic car.

Lego 1966 Batmobile
Have a closer look at this classic Batmobile.

This sweet ride will soon be an official giveaway set!

There’s something about a 50s era car that gives me a deep sense of longing for a time and a place that I was never a part of. Well, it turns out so many others share in this notion. The term for that is not nostalgia but rather… anemoia. Versteinert likely knows what I mean as evidenced by this fabulously 50s convertible. The good news for anyone not a sexagenarian but still in love with that 50s style is this ride was the grand prize winner in the LEGO Ideas contest and will soon be an official Gift with Purchase set. Details as to exactly when and which sets you’d need to purchase haven’t been released yet, but our not-too-distant future is looking bright!

Aedelsten oldschool

Contest rules state that any entry would need to be a generic design. I say “generic” meaning no particular model or brand, but I’m seeing a little bit of ’59 Impala, little bit of ’57 Chevy Bel Air, little bit of Ford, little bit of Cadillac and all things that make my heart go pitter-patter. The ice skate blade hood ornament is inspired, and the Dagmars (named after this actress) on the bumper are an excellent touch, but the pièce de résistance would have to be these surfboards. It would seem giving us all a sense of anemoia just might be this builder’s thing. Here’s a prior time we featured his vintage Chevy truck.

The incredible inedible electric egg

Electric cars existed long before Tesla, dating back to the 19th century. But one of the most bizarre-looking was L’Oeuf Electrique, which is French for the Electric Egg. Designed by Paul Arzens in 1942, the little three-wheeled car consisted of an aluminum body and plexiglass windshield. Small cars like the BMW Isetta would prove popular in post-World War II Europe, and Arzens hoped his eclectic electric might also find a place on the road. While Arzen’s concept never really took off, we’d like to think he would be proud to see his car brilliantly reproduced in LEGO-form by Aido K.

L'Oeuf Electrique

Take a closer look at this unusual looking electric car.

As an alternative, you could build this ‘Stang

When the official LEGO 10265 Ford Mustang set was released a while back, it received high praise as being one of the best LEGO cars ever produced. The strong lines of the classic muscle car translated well into brick form. But what about the more modern Mustangs, which, though they do hearken back to some of the angular aesthetics of the muscle car heyday, are more curvy and seductive? Well, builder Firas Abu-Jaber took it upon himself to create an updated version of the set, and the resultant Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 looks amazing!

Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 10265 Model B MOC

More amazing than the way it looks, though, is the fact that this is made with only the parts contained in set 10265; no outside parts were used, other than the different wheels (though the wheels from the set fit fine, they just don’t match the styling of contemporary cars, so you could make it without updated rims if you wanted to). That means, if you have that set at home, you could build this one, too. The scales are slightly different, with the set being roughly 1:13 and this being about 1:15, but that’s a small difference when it looks this slick. Despite this being a “B model” from the original set, I’d give this an A+.

Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 10265 Model B MOC

Do you love this car? Check out a Bugatti and a Ferrari by the same builder.

The Bugatti Centodieci is a nod to its own legacy

Do you like the LEGO automotive work of Firas Abu-Jaber? Do you enjoy everything Bugatti has to offer? Do you have $8.9 million burning a hole in your pocket? Well, two out of three isn’t bad. Only ten of youse with deep pockets would have already placed your order for the 2020 Bugatti Centodieci, the rest of us average schlubs will just have to settle for drooling over Firas’ stunning LEGO rendition. I’m particularly fond of the turntable plates that comprises sort of a “cheese grater” vent at the B-pillar, which is an obvious nod to the Bugatti EB110SS supercar of the 90’s but the larger iconic horseshoe grille is reminiscent of the more modern Veyron and Chiron. Complex and subtle curves is what gives all of Firas’s work his signature style.

2020 Bugatti Centodieci

The 2020 Centodieci is so new and so rare that Firas had to guess how the doors and engine lid opened as there are no photographs online yet showing how it all works. He made an educated guess that it would go something like this.

2020 Bugatti Centodieci

No matter how the doors open in real life, the 2020 Bugatti Centodieci is a nod to its own legacy and is one of many, many reasons our hearts go pitter-patter whenever we see Firas’ work.

This Mustang is ready to run with the horses

Not much screams “American” like a big-engined, gas-guzzling, machismo-granting muscle car. The throaty roar of the tailpipes, the peeling tires, racing down a secluded stretch of road away from the cops…ahh, for the halcyon days of my youth, playing with my Hotwheels cars. A while back, LEGO Ideas hosted a contest to build a poster for the Ford Mustang to celebrate the release of the large Creator Expert Mustang set, and aido k submitted a digital entry, but wanted to make a ‘Stang in real bricks, too. The challenges were real, since making an 8-stud wide car with a battery box inside for the working lights is not easy. But the finished product looks great, clad in the classic white with blue stripes.

Classic Mustang

I love the angled windscreen to get a steeper look than the piece provides. A subtle variation in how far down the tiles on the side are pressed creates a delightful little scoop in the side door, and the roller skate makes a brilliant door handle. The fastback slope is smoothly done, too, integrating nicely with the rest of the car. The lights make this machine one of the coolest cars I have seen, with their warm glow enhancing the photos and the presentation. Now who wants to go burn some rubber and show those Camaros and Challengers who is boss?

Classic Mustang

The new Chevrolet Corvette C8 is really a very pretty car, even in LEGO

I have got to admit something quite shallow. I’m ashamed to say, but when it comes to cars, I judge the book by its cover. I only care what it looks like on the outside; I can’t figure out how many pistons or spark plugs it requires to blast off from 0 to 100km/h. Nor do I care! What I do know, however, is how difficult it is to capture the essence of beautiful curves and do justice to the real Chevrolet Corvette C8 using only hard-edged plastic bricks! The top trophy goes to Lasse Deleuran for even attempting this feat. And what I like about car builds like this one is how the windscreens are built using regular non-trans clear pieces. And though it’s not exactly new, I always love the Round 1×1 Quarter tiles used in many builds to smooth out the rough edges.

C8 Corvette - version 3 - top

Click to see more of the Corvette C8

A Ferrari fleet to feed your fancy

Builder Angka has shared a quartet of LEGO Ferrari models with all the style of their real-world counterparts. Just take in the lovely lines achieved in these 8-stud-wide builds. The combination of cheese slopes and curved slopes convey a real sense of aerodynamic shaping. Though structurally similar, each build has unique design elements that are worth looking for. It’s left as an exercise for the reader to spot them all…but I’d be remiss if I didn’t explicitly call out that amazing rubber band usage as window trim.

Ferrari 328 GTS Nero
Ferrari 328 GTS Nero
Ferrari Mondial Cabriolet
Ferrari Mondial Cabriolet
Ferrari 348 TS
Ferrari 348 TS
Ferrari 328 GTS
Ferrari 328 GTS

If you’d like to try building these models for yourself, Angka has provided an exploded view of the GTS to get you started. The design really takes advantage of modular sectioning; hopefully it will inspire others to make their own modifications to these already awesome cars. Of course, if you’d rather go “stock” you might consider LEGO Speed Champions 75890 Ferrari F40 Competizione

Ferrari 308 GTS

Get ready for a family vacation road trip, LEGO style

If you are looking for great LEGO models of cars in a 1:1 scale to the LEGO Minifig, look no further than these two classic automobiles by Mateusz Waldowski. At first glance, it would be easy to mistake these dual versions of the 1970s Ford Granada MK1 for die-cast Hotwheels. From the smoothly curved hoods to the white stripes made from official sticker material, there’s not a visible stud to be seen. One of my favorite details is the little tab sticking out for each door handle. (See if you can figure out how they did it.) And that luggage rack is ready for the Griswolds to load up for their family vacation.

We came, we saw, we kicked its bricks!

When there’s something strange in the LEGOhood, who you gonna call? Darren Thew, that’s who! The Ecto 1 has been modeled in LEGO bricks many times before, but Darren takes things to a new level with a massive version of the beloved vehicle from Ghostbusters. He has taken great care in striving for authenticity, from every minute detail on the roof to the use of System and Technic parts to form the curvaceous shape of the retrofitted 1959 Cadillac Miller-Meteor.

Ghostbusters Ecto1

See more of this ghostbusting ride.

A perfect pair of Porsches

Legendary car builder George Panteleon tells us that one of the most iconic and beautiful generation of Porsche 911 is the 1973 Carrera RSR. I consulted the records of all things beautiful and iconic and that statement checks out. He started with the yellow one about a year ago but has not photographed it until recently. Later he wanted another with a more striking color scheme so he went with the white with blue and red racing stripes.

Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 1973

Each consists of 779 pieces and features a fully detailed interior and opening trunk, hood and doors.

Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 1973

George’s prowess with car building doesn’t end with this perfect pair of Porsches so be sure to check out his other automotive wonders on his photostream. If you are inclined to build a few dream cars of your own, his book How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks may help with that.

Not your grandpa’s Cadillac (or is it?)

Back in 1989 the late car building legend Boyd Coddington built a very special custom car for ZZ Top’s guitarist Billy Gibbons. It started with a 1948 Cadillac Series 62 Sedanette but nearly a million dollars later it had become a custom showstopper like no other. Now in 2019 LEGO car building legend Tim Inman has produced his own version. It is unusual for us to feature a three-quarter rear view of anything as the primary photo but in the case of CadZZilla, its low-slung roof line easing into the rear bumper and its signature taillights are what gives even the seasoned custom car enthusiast heart palpitations.

Billy Gibbons' CadZZilla

No less impressive up front, this model replicates CadZZilla’s famous grille and expansive hood. A mark of a good builder is if they can imagine a LEGO piece not for its intended purpose. Tim has utilized upside-down minifigure legs as part of the front bumper detail. A posh tan adorns the interior while the stance is that of a crouching aggressive animal. Of course, there is enough dark purple LEGO here to please any Prince impersonator. While Billy Gibbons is of grandparent age, he seemed to have bucked the rock star stereotype of siring multiple kids. So CadZZilla truly is not your grandpa’s Cadillac.

Billy Gibbons' CadZZilla