Tag Archives: Car

Before skateboarding and punk rock there was Krass and Bernie

LEGO builder Chris Vesque tells us that in a very specific time of his life, before skateboarding, before hip hop, before punk rock, before geeks and fandom…just a bit past Star Wars and Classic Space, there was Krass & Bernie. He goes on to say how CARtoons Magazine and the art of George Trosley captured his imagination and his funny bone. Krass and Bernie is a comic penned by Trosley about two car customizing enthusiasts who are short on good sense but long in creativity and ingenuity. Their misadventures often culminate in something as ridiculous and over-the-top as this dragster-beetle. The beefy tires, the blown V-8 and the Beetle that seems to defy gravity are the stuff that can only exist in CARtoon dreams. I’m smitten! Whether it be the screaming hand Santa Cruz skateboarding logo or the Beastie Boys License to Ill album cover we’ve been smitten with Chris’ counterculture LEGO stuff before.

Krass & Bernie

Vroom Vroom Vroom, let me hear you say wey-oh

LEGO custom car superstar Ian Ying is on something of a roll. In hot pursuit of his recent LEGO dragster, here comes a beast of a concept racer. This thing is all smooth sports car lines up-front, and then mad-as-a-box-of-frogs supercharged drag racer at the back. The angles and curves, built with a smart selection of tiles and slopes, are spot-on, and together with the restrained use of stickers and a nicely-blocked colour scheme manage to make this look like a much bigger model than it really is. But there’s no getting away from it; the stupid/amazing turbocharged engine and enormous wheels to the rear grab all the attention. And quite rightly too; the whole thing is gloriously over the top!

GReddyConceptRacingCar4

How many studs does it take to make a supercar?

The good things about standards are that there are so many of them. Take for example the seemingly simple measurement of how wide a LEGO car should be. The City theme usually sticks to four and six stud widths, and most fan creations have followed that guideline. That standard certainly made things easier for collaborative town displays. But recently we’ve got a game-changer in a new 8 stud wide standard for Speed Champions vehicles. Builders have already started to explore this larger scale’s additional detail and upgraded real-world shaping. But not every stud count has to be even. Jonathan Elliott has created a De Tomaso Pantera supercar in a seven stud width.

De Tomaso Pantera

Jonathan’s 6-stud version was already great, but there’s a lot to love about this new take. Built around the new Speed Champions windscreen, it also incorporates new mudguards and more extensive use of 1×2 cheese slope tiles. The shaping is just superb, and I’m looking forward to seeing what Jonathan tackles next at this scale.

Some cars are just super, but some are totally hyper!

When getting from point A to point B in a regular car just doesn’t cut it, then you need a supercar. But when a supercar doesn’t make your discerning heart go pitter-patter anymore then a LEGO builder who goes by the name of 3D supercarBricks has the solution for you. It’s a pretty super Bugatti Chiron GT in striking yellow and black. Categorized as a Hypercar, this Chiron is what happens when a supercar rises to the top 1%. With 1500 horsepower, and topping out at 261mph, the real-life Bugatti Chiron GT is a technological marvel. While much slower, this LEGO version also isn’t without its charms. A brief perusal through this builder’s Flick photostream proves 3D supercarBricks lives up to their name, which is a good thing because photos of LEGO cats or houses would have been totally weird.

ChironGT #3dprinting #3dsupercarbricks #bugatti #bugattichiron #gt #visiongt #bugattichironsport #lego #supercar #hypercar #3d #legocar #legocreate #create #moc #amsterdam #bricks #legophotography #legosupercar #legocarmoc #legocollection

Got a Mustang but want a Charger? Just mod it

LEGO car master Firas Abu-Jaber offers us two-for-one with his latest creation: first-up, delivering a 1968 Dodge Charger using only the pieces from the 10265 LEGO Ford Mustang set, and then putting together a sleek black and chrome version of the same design. Both cars are excellent, with the sleek lines given more than a hint of brutish power with the prominent engine blocks poking from the bonnet. Personally I prefer the mean and moody look of the black and chrome, although I’d happily have either sitting in my driveway. But seriously Firas, restricting yourself to a parts selection designed to create a particular make and model, but building a different make and model?!? If the results weren’t so good, I’d suggest that’s borderline masochism!

LEGO 1968 Dodge Charger R/T

A Duesenberg adds some much needed class to this joint

My stars, have you seen the lowbrow tomfoolery these Brothers Brick writers get away with? Some days I just want to clutch my pearls and retreat to the fainting couch. That is why I was delighted to see this classic Duesenberg by LEGO builder Łukasz Libuszewski. The tires are painted, but that is probably the only good way to replicate whitewalls in this scale. Speaking of scale, being only six studs wide, this classic car proves you don’t need to be a Rockefeller with mountains of LEGO in order to grace our pages. It doesn’t hurt that the photography of this creation is top-notch. Keep it classy, Brothers Brick!

Duesenberg

A car designed to win

Last year, British Formula 1 driver Lewis Hamilton won his 6th world champion title. Although he has to win one more championship to equal Michael Schumacher’s achievement, his career statistics are remarkable, to say the least. Half of his success is, of course, his outstanding driving talent, but the other half is always the car. Noah_L pays tribute to incredible Mercedes-AMG F1 W10, which Lewis piloted during 2019 season. The scale of the model, which appears to be around 1:15, sets a whole bunch of designing challenges.

Mercedes-AMG F1 W10 EQ Power+ (5)

Formula 1 cars are known for their supersophisticated aerodynamic elements, which are always hard to build. But according to the builder’s comment, matching the livery was the most challenging part. Certain parts of the car’s body are colored in turquoise, which is the signature color of Mercedes’ sponsor, Petronas. Although more and more types of LEGO pieces appear in dark turquoise since 2018, the assortment is still pretty limited. However, Noah did a fantastic job recreating the livery as precisely as possible.

When you’ve got a ’69 Charger, a mullet and a GED the world is your oyster!

Sometimes you just want to shirk all responsibilities, grow a mullet and get a ’69 Dodge Charger R/T. I mean, come on, look at it! It’s beautiful! Clearly, Tony Bovkoon knows what I’m talking about. The Statue of Liberty only further illustrates that this car is classic American muscle. That’s freedom right there! In this car, shirts don’t need sleeves, jeans are acid-washed and the radio dial never veers away from anything that doesn’t play Freebird or Born to be Wild on a continuous loop. When you’ve got a ’69 Charger, a mullet and a GED the world opens up to a myriad of possibilities. Some of them involve getting burgers, drag racing, raisin’ hell, and maybe smoking a doobie or two.

Dodge charger 1969 R/T

Click here to go for a ride into the sunset.

From Mustang to Pantera

When some folks buy LEGO sets, they are quite content to follow the instructions and build exactly what the designers had in mind. They build a set, admire the item on the shelf, shampoo, rinse, repeat, and that is the extent of their LEGO experience. But us builders are a different breed entirely. When Serge S bought the 10265 Ford Mustang set he had a different plan in mind for the parts. Taking us to a time when automotive designs were drawn by hand and without the assistance of computers, he constructed the mid-engined De Tomaso Pantera GT5.

De Tomaso Pantera GT5

This alternate view proves that all doors open and that the engine occupies what would normally be the trunk or boot as it’s called elsewhere. Once again this creation uses only the parts from the official Mustang set. I don’t know about you, but I’m smitten!

De Tomaso Pantera GT5

Fighting crime like it’s 1966

Throughout Batman’s illustrious career, he has driven a wide range of Batmobiles — and LEGO fans have built several wonderful representations over the years. While many people might point to the 1989 Batmobile as their favorite, mine would have to be Adam West’s ride from the 1960s Batman TV series. Custom car legend George Barris owned the 1955 Lincoln Futura concept car and modified it into a bat-classic. Therefore, I squealed like a bat with glee when I saw Lucas‘ LEGO version of this iconic car.

Lego 1966 Batmobile
Have a closer look at this classic Batmobile.

This sweet ride will soon be an official giveaway set!

There’s something about a 50s era car that gives me a deep sense of longing for a time and a place that I was never a part of. Well, it turns out so many others share in this notion. The term for that is not nostalgia but rather… anemoia. Versteinert likely knows what I mean as evidenced by this fabulously 50s convertible. The good news for anyone not a sexagenarian but still in love with that 50s style is this ride was the grand prize winner in the LEGO Ideas contest and will soon be an official Gift with Purchase set. Details as to exactly when and which sets you’d need to purchase haven’t been released yet, but our not-too-distant future is looking bright!

Aedelsten oldschool

Contest rules state that any entry would need to be a generic design. I say “generic” meaning no particular model or brand, but I’m seeing a little bit of ’59 Impala, little bit of ’57 Chevy Bel Air, little bit of Ford, little bit of Cadillac and all things that make my heart go pitter-patter. The ice skate blade hood ornament is inspired, and the Dagmars (named after this actress) on the bumper are an excellent touch, but the pièce de résistance would have to be these surfboards. It would seem giving us all a sense of anemoia just might be this builder’s thing. Here’s a prior time we featured his vintage Chevy truck.

The incredible inedible electric egg

Electric cars existed long before Tesla, dating back to the 19th century. But one of the most bizarre-looking was L’Oeuf Electrique, which is French for the Electric Egg. Designed by Paul Arzens in 1942, the little three-wheeled car consisted of an aluminum body and plexiglass windshield. Small cars like the BMW Isetta would prove popular in post-World War II Europe, and Arzens hoped his eclectic electric might also find a place on the road. While Arzen’s concept never really took off, we’d like to think he would be proud to see his car brilliantly reproduced in LEGO-form by Aido K.

L'Oeuf Electrique

Take a closer look at this unusual looking electric car.