Category Archives: LEGO

You’d probably expect a lot of the posts on a LEGO blog like The Brothers Brick to be about LEGO, and you’d be right. If you’re browsing this page, you might want to consider narrowing what you’re looking for by checking out categories like “Space” and “Castle.” We’re sure there’s something here that’ll fascinate and amaze you.

So you wanna upgrade your podracer eh?

Usually a clutter of detail in a LEGO creation can be a bad thing, dragging the eye around the image and distracting attention from what should be the scene’s focus. However, Patrick B.‘s excellent recreation of Watto’s Workshop from The Phantom Menace takes surrounding clutter and turns it into the main event.

IDSMO2: Watto´s Shop

As well as some smart brick-built greebly things lying around, Patrick has also made use of individual LEGO elements with interesting textures. Okay, this might not be actual building as such, but the carefully-haphazard arrangement of these bricks adds nicely to the overall sense of detail and depth. And don’t miss the lovely touches like the use of textured grille bricks for a cross-hatched floor effect, and the conical equipment built of “cheesegrater wedges” standing towards the rear.

Original Star Wars movie poster recreated in LEGO

Gamabomb‘s latest model is a fantastic recreation of the original 1977 Star Wars movie poster. While the large figures of Luke and Leia have been effectively crafted using bricks (check out the abs on Luke!), the builder has also cleverly used minifigs of C3PO and R2D2 to represent the famous droids as they appeared in the original print, while the sinister Vader looms out of the background shadows. All in all, this is an excellent version of an iconic image, immediately recognisable even as a thumbnail, yet rewarding of a zoom-in to catch all the details. The Force is strong with this one.

Star Wars Poster 1977

Across the wine-dark sea in his swift, curved-hull ship

Last autumn we featured some adorably tiny Greek galleys, and I noted how unusual Classical LEGO creations are, despite several Greek and Roman soldiers featured among Collectible Minifigures. Rat Dude has built a beautiful forty-oared Greek galley named the Hyperion. While this armchair archaeologist might quibble with the double masts (for a such a small ship), the overall effect from stem to stern is gorgeous. I particularly love what appears to be rams’ heads on the bow, along with the metal ram. The Greek marines on deck look ready to board an enemy vessel!

LEGO Greek galley

Hulking, mean and spiky: the Merkabah Gunship

Brick Martil‘s Merkabah-class Heavy Gunship is one of the coolest spacecraft I’ve seen in a while. The shape and the phenomenal color blocking are ravishing, giving this model a strikingly unique appearance. This ship positively screams “deadly”.

merkabah space 2

Another element I love about this ship is the size. A lot of LEGO spacecraft would be sized akin to small WWII dogfighters, regardless of its designation as a fighter, heavy bomber, etc. Most would clock in around 20-40 (scale) feet in length, while many modern fighter jets are 50-60 feet long, and other classes even larger. So it’s cool to see a spacecraft sized up to what they most likely would be without becoming capital ships — where a two-man gunship is a huge craft, outfitted with engines and life support to get it through the cold reaches of space and the harrowing re-entry of an atmosphere, not to mention lugging a payload.

The Merkabah is deceptively large — that windscreen is from the UCS Slave I, so check out this comparison photo of the two to get a feel for just how big it is. And here’s a closeup shot so you can check out the fantastic detailing…

Close look of Merkabah gunship

The great outdoors awaits

… and what better way to get there than in Lino Martins‘ latest creation? This fabulous 1974 Ford Bronco features the trademark touches which make Lino one of my favourite builders — smooth curves and good color choices all wrapped up in the large scale he seems to have made his signature.

1974 Ford Bronco

Obviously the canoe and the power winch are lovely, the wood paneling effect is neat, and that metallic stripe down the side is just sweet. But what tops this model off for me is the detailed engine beneath the bonnet — brilliant stuff.

1974 Ford Bronco

LEGO Collectible Minifigures Series 16 Feel Guide [News]

LEGO’s new Collectible Minifigures Series 16 is hitting stores around the world, so be sure to check out our review of Series 16. But how do you find the ones you want? Some people are happy taking their luck with purchasing a random bag, but many fans — be they kids, collectors, or just regular joes — will want to collect the whole set, or maybe just one or two very specific figures. You could guarantee that by purchasing an entire case, but buying 60 figures just to guarantee a set of 16 is very expensive. So, of course, the alternative is to ready your nimble figures and prognosticate what’s in the bags by touch alone. With years of experience doing this since Series 1, we’re here to help make that task a bit easier.

LEGO Collectible Minifigures Series 16

Get your digits ready, it’s time to start poking and prodding plastic bags of minifigs.

Click to read the full Feel Guide

Donald Duck mech is ready to take the fight to Mickey

Looks like Donald has finally had enough of that mouse hogging the limelight. Dvd‘s latest creation shows just how everyone’s favourite anthropomorphic duck plans to even the score. This is the sort of model we love here at TBB — it’s not just good fun, it’s a really well-built mech too.

Donald's Mech Walker

Too often these kind of mash-ups rely too heavily on the presence of the minifig to explain themselves, but here the job gets done with excellent colour-blocking — realistic-looking, but also unmistakably “Donald”. And if you need any more convincing this is a cracking mech model in it’s own right, then check out the beautiful greeble-work on the legs…

Donald's Mech Walker

My only criticism here is the photography is a little washed-out. I wonder if a gray backdrop and less harsh lighting might have given better contrast for the base and white elements of the model? However, that’s minor nitpicking at an otherwise excellent creation.

LEGO announces end of Bionicle theme, 2016 to be final year [News]

LEGO’s Bionicle theme has been among the longest running proprietary themes LEGO’s ever developed. Bionicle started in 2001, where it was one of the most original toys to hit the market during my childhood. I still remember buying the first wave of Toa, with their elemental powers, and avidly reading the comics with sweeping story arcs that accompanied them. The first Bionicle theme lasted until 2009, when it was discontinued in favor of LEGO’s next buildable-action figure theme, Hero Factory. Hero Factory had a successful run for five years, from 2010-2014, but never achieved the acclaim or fandom that surrounded Bionicle. Last year, LEGO returned to Bionicle, and fans could experience the world of the Toa heroes again. All told, over the 12 years Bionicle has been in production, Bricklink records 433 set entries for the theme — a remarkable life for the home-grown theme. However, LEGO has announced that 2016 will be the final year for Bionicle. Read the full press release below.

Bionicle_Wide

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LEGO scenes from Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

First, we were blown away with tiny scenes from The Sorcerer’s Stone, then with vignettes from The Chamber of Secrets. And now (you guessed it) we have a series of wonderful LEGO scenes from Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. This time around, the master builder behind the month-long madness was Kevin Wollert. In total, Kevin built 23 amazing Potter-themed vignettes. Each of the scenes took me back to the first time I read the book (the best one in the series if you ask me). I especially appreciate how Kevin was able to capture the dark tones of this story.

009 - Quidditch

002 - Waiting for the Knight Bus 011 - Harrys Godfather

Click here to see the full set

LEGO Worms with arms

Worms was an artillery strategy video game released in 1995, back when worms were fashionable. The sometimes-controversial builder Suck My Brick has nicely captured these well-armed and battle-ready guys in LEGO form. There is definitely a humorous side to arming worms with grenades, flame-throwers and machine guns, and the comedy has been transferred to these brick versions. From hot dog bun eyebrows, through a cigarette-chomping worm, through to a Rambo-worm with bad teeth, what’s not to love about these little dudes?

"Worms"

My favourite is the grumpy warworn worm on the right with his grenade and WWII-style helmet. There’s some ingenious parts usage to create his grenade pin. Shame he has no hands to pull the pin and throw it!

All who gain power are afraid to lose it. Even the Jedi.

Say what you will about Episodes I through III, but I can appreciate a climactic turning point in a character’s story arc. I can appreciate it, even more, when such a scene is translated into LEGO! Cecilie Fritzvold beautifully captured the final scene of the opening sequence from Revenge of the Sith where Anakin begins his journey to the dark side by killing Count Dooku. The amount of detail jammed into this LEGO scene is fantastic! I love the microscale ships in the background, Palpatine’s clikits handcuffs, and of course, the prone, unconscious body of Obi-Wan in the foreground.

Kill him. Kill him now.

In case you missed it earlier this month, Cecilie also built a micro-podracer from The Phantom Menace. As always, be sure to check out all of Cecilie’s builds on Flickr and may the force be with you.

Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake in LEGO

Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake is iconic. It’s a familiar love story of the White Swan, Odette, and Prince Sigfried. One thing I always thought was amazing was Odile’s fouettés: this is where the dancer spins 360 degrees, on pointe. Odile does them to “steal” the prince, and the original ballerina could do 32 in a row.

In 1995, choreographer Matthew Bourne left his mark on Swan Lake with one major change: the swan’s gender. Odette and the corps de ballet, traditionally danced by ballerinas, was now performed by male dancers. David Hughes has given us this glorious and very recognizable sculpture of the Lead Swan in the classic pose, used by the dancers to imitate some bird-like moves giving grace to the dance.

The White Swan