Tag Archives: Steampunk

Looking at these LEGO steampunk models, you can almost hear the hiss of steam, the clank of gears, and the whirr of clockwork. The steampunk aesthetic isn’t all wood and brass, so be sure to check out all the colorful models alongside classic steampunk creations from around the world.

Victorian behemoth oozes steam and charm in equal measure

Okay, so we’re kind of Moko fanboys round here, but this fabulous steampunk mech was too good not to feature. Wonderful shaping, brilliantly clanky and functional-looking joints, and a nice combination of colors and metallic pieces.

Steampunk Mech

I love the implied heft in this model, and the vaguely-samurai feel the back flag and armor evokes. Splashes of gold from the LotR ring parts add nice highlights amongst the greens and browns, and the pilot’s headgear really stands out, drawing attention to the cockpit area. The quality building isn’t limited to the front – the model’s rear is beautifully detailed too…

Steampunk Mech

Moko has also put together an accompanying group of steampunk minifigs, which just exude Victorian-adventurer chic. Look at the use of the ballerina’s tutu as underskirts! Genius. I’m going to be stealing that idea…

Steampunk Minifigs

Elegant airship takes to the aether

I really like this steampunk airship, The Morning Mist by Ooger. The hull enjoys nice lines and great color-blocking, and those balloons are excellent. The masts between the spheres provide unobtrusive support, ensuring the balloons look like they’re genuinely holding the ship aloft, a trick many steampunk creations don’t manage to pull off convincingly.

The Morning Mist

The dragon head adds a lovely touch of the exotic, but what made this model stand out for me was the uncluttered deck area. Steampunk building often lends itself to a messy, cobbled-together feel, but sometimes it’s good to see something as sleek and clean as this creation.

The only area where I think this build could be improved is in the way the various flags and puffs of smoke are currently all blowing in different directions. It’s a tiny thing, but it undermines the sense of the ship being in motion. However, that’s nit-picking at an otherwise great piece of building. This is the sort of fancy sky-yacht I’d quite like to own myself.

You’ll believe a dwarf can fly

Dwalin Forkbeard has built a cracking little Dwarven gyrocopter, packed full of fantasy steampunk goodness. The model takes inspiration from the Warhammer tabletop fantasy wargame, and I think it’s brilliant. A clanking, whirling, mechanical marvel with no chance of achieving lift in real life – this is my favourite kind of steampunk flying machine…

Gyrocopter

The dark green curved section sits atop a wonderfully greebly underside, studded with functional-looking appendages. The cannon at the front is nicely integrated and looks wonderfully stubby. The star of this show however, is the rotor assembly – a fantastic piece of machinery seemingly cobbled together from spare cogs and timber. Great stuff.

Delivering news and sundries aboard the Flying Erwin

According to Jonas, the Flying Erwin is “a kiosk traveling from town to town to supply the citizens of 1880 with all odds and ends.” Built together with Brick Vader, this lovely balloon has a long tonne of amazing details, from the cow’s skull on the awning and the weathervane atop the balloon to the steaming boiler and adorable crane.

The Flying Erwin

Like the green and gold marvel we highlighted last week, Jonas and Brick Vader’s colorful build proves once again that steampunk need not be all brown and gray.

An electric blast from an alternate past

Captain Smog is one of my favourite steampunk builders. His models always provide classy and colorful relief from the endless sea of brown and grey creations which can sometimes fill up the LEGO Steampunk Group on Flickr. I’ve been guilty of “brownification” myself in past clanky creations, but I’m now firmly of the opinion we steampunk builders should get our act together and start using some of our more colorful bricks more often.

Anyway, enough ranting and back to this model. It’s a cracker, a lurching mechanical beast of an electrical cannon, WITH A LOVELY COLOR SCHEME THAT IS NOT MOSTLY BROWN.

MMTC: main view

Click through for more photos of this mechanical marvel!

Ninjago 70605 Misfortune’s Keep [Review]

Ninjago’s new theme for 2016, called Skybound, takes us to the air in an epic duel between sky pirates and our intrepid heroes, the ninjas. We’ve already reviewed 70603 Zeppelin Raid, and now thanks to LEGO we are able to get our hands on the literal flagship for the theme, 70605 Misfortune’s Keep. The set includes 754 pieces, and we expect it to retail for around $80 when it debuts in the coming weeks. Included are the main airship, a smaller flier for both factions, and six minifigs and a monkey.

70605 Misfortune's Keep

Read the full review after the jump!

70603 Zeppelin Raid from Ninjago 2016 [Review]

The Steampunk-inspired January 2016 wave of Ninjago will soon be available, bringing airships and balloons and epic Pirate-versus-Ninja fights. The first set in our review tally is 70603 Zeppelin Raid, brought to us courtesy of LEGO. It features a small airship held aloft by a balloon and piloted by a pair of sky pirates; one a snake and the other skeleton. It also includes one of the eponymous Ninja heroes flying a small craft. We can’t confirm the price yet, but the set has 293 pieces, so expect it around the $30 USD mark.

70603 Raid Zeppelin

Read the full review after the jump!

LEGO Ninjago 2016 sets unveiled [News]

We’re finally able to bring you high-quality images of the next wave of Ninjago sets. With a decidedly Steampunk flair and the Ninjago heroes facing sky pirates, you’ll be able to answer the age old question of who’s better: Pirates or Ninjas? No definitive word on pricing yet, but this wave should be available in January. Check out all the images after the jump.

70603 Ninjago Zeppelin Raid
70603 Ninjago Raid Zeppelin

70603 Ninjago Raid Zeppelin (2)

Stage an aerial conflict between Doubloon’s Raid Zeppelin airship and Zane’s flyer. The Zeppelin is armed with a firing front cannon, 2 stud shooters and has a trapdoor function to drop barrels of dynamite (and captured Ninja warriors!). Retaliate by firing the flyer’s elemental ice stud shooters and battle for the special Djinn Blade with trapped Jay’ element.

  • Includes 3 minifigures: Zane, Doubloon and Clancee.
  • The Raid Zeppelin airship features a spring-activated pirate cannon, 2 stud shooters, anchor-shaped fold-out wings, trapdoor function to drop a barrel of dynamite (or minifigures), adjustable pirate flag and translucent fire elements.
  • Zane’s flyer features handlebars, 2 adjustable hover blades and 2 elemental ice stud shooters.
  • Weapons include a translucent dark-blue Djinn Blade with trapped Jay’ element, Zane’s 2 golden katanas and 2 golden shurikens, Doubloon’s 2 pirate swords and Clancee’s broomstick.
  • Raid Zeppelin measures over 5″ (15cm) high, 11″ (29cm) long and 6″ (16cm) wide. Zane’s flyer measures over 3″ (1cm) high, 1″ (5cm) long and 4″ (11cm) wide.

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Steam-age Mutant Ninja Turtles

Mashups are everywhere right now. So it’s strangely unsurprising (but still quite entertaining) to see the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles fighting crime in the Victorian period. Karen Quinn has built a charming steam-powered Party Wagon. In addition to everyone’s favorite anthropomorphic turtles, this build includes Guru Splinter, Casey “Sheer Luck” Holmes, Dr. April O’Watson, and Jack the Shredder. Perhaps next time the heroes in a half shell will travel even further back in time, to say, oh I don’t know, the Renaissance?

Steam Age Mutant Ninja Turtles

The discovery of Novo Atlantis

Eero Okkonen built this dreamy scene for the Finnish LEGO club Palikkatakomo‘s summer building contest, themed “Finding, Discovering.” Featuring a lovely twisted tower and an underwater walker, the scene defies categorization into the conventions of “steampunk” or “dieselpunk.” Then again, the hats worn by the divers are rather hilariously twee.

Novo Atlantis

You can read more of the backstory for this scene on Eero’s blog, Cyclopic Bricks.