Tag Archives: Kai/Geneva

Hang in there, gas stations. We’ll need you in Valhalla!

The apocalypse didn’t happen quite as we had expected. Most of us have the masks and social distancing down pat, but when is it appropriate to start wearing spiked shoulder pads and warpaint? I mean, will shouting “witness me!” while spraying chrome paint over my teeth whisk me away to glorious Valhalla, or will it just make me look foolish at a Starbucks? I really want to do right by this apocalypse thing. I can assure you, the last thing I want is to look foolish at Starbucks while ordering a pumpkin spice latte. This LEGO abandoned garage by Kai/Geneva reminds me that this has been more of a stay home, stay safe and watch Netflix kind of apocalypse. I do hope that they hang in there, though.

While I have not visited a gas station in nearly three months, there may come a time when we’ll have rage-fueled war convoys, and when that happens, we’ll need all the gas we can get. So hang in there, please! Someday, when apocalyptic fashion dictates, I may outfit my little Beetle with truck tires and steel girders and wreak bloody havoc on the Fury Road…or to Whole Foods to pick up some kale and quinoa. You know, the impulse items.

Abandoned Gas Station

Seaside fort has every angle covered

The nature of our favourite modelling medium sees many creations which sit on a “grid” of perpendicular lines. Sometimes all a great LEGO model needs to do is break free of those right-angled rules. That’s exactly what Kai/Geneva has done with this neat little Imperial Fort. It’s a small model, but it’s packed with good technique and interesting lines. Check out the angled bastion walls of the fort’s base and its rounded turret. When you combine that shaping with the weathering effects on the main building, the subtle waves breaking up the expanse of water, and the smart use of brick separators for the roof, you’ve got a lovely little seaside scene.

LEGO pirates imperial fort

Mother knows best

LEGO builder Kai/Geneva‘s Dinosaur Nest creation is a fine example of both landscaping and unorthodox use of parts. I love the sloping of the tan and dark orange parts. Together they add to the ancient world of the dinosaurs seen here. The nest itself is made of seemingly random brown and dark brown pieces, and the lack of uniformity of the parts that make up the nest add to its realism, suggesting that the mother velociraptor gathered the sticks herself for her young.

Dinosaur Nest

“As the mother velociraptor sees her chicks appear, she calls to them, beginning a lifetime of affectionate communication and warnings of danger. After all, who knows what larger carnivores are lurking nearby. Now, we must be careful as to not be seen by the mother — Oh no! I’ve been spotted! Run!”

Dinosaur Nest