About Josh

Josh is 30+ years old and has more Lego than he has hair. Which really isn't saying much. He builds mostly medieval creations, but dabbles in other genres. He is also a father and uses his kids as an excuse to buy Lego. That justification isn't working as well as it used to, so if you can think of a better justification, feel free to contact him. Meanwhile, back at the ranch, Josh's Brickshelf gallery gets messier and messier. Josh also has a Flickr gallery, if you care about such things. He goes by the name "floodllama" there. If you wonder why he goes by "floodllama", you've obviously never owned a llama in flood. Josh feels sorry for you.

Posts by Josh

The Retro-future is bright: a chat with French builder extraordinaire, Vincent Gachod [Interview]

This week we were able to sit down with Vincent Gachod from Toulouse, in the south of France. While balancing his job as the head of video production at a french university and raising two kids, he finds time to create some incredible LEGO builds. Let’s pick his brain and see what we can learn from this master of the brick.
The Mechanic
TBB: How did you get into the LEGO hobby and what inspires you to build?

Vince: I started with LEGO in the mid 70’s with bricks from my brother’s collection. My first set was the 374 Fire Station of 1978. After my “dark age” in the 90’s, I came back to LEGO with my son and his first sets. I’m inspired by lot of influences (movies, animation, videos games, books, magazines, cars, architecture…) but I’m more inspired by the details : a car’s wheel, a plane’s engine or a vintage vacuum cleaner! I often start a MOC from a single detail like a car’s grille or an exhaust pipe. I spend a long time working on details.

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Room with a View, Baby Doll and Building in Bed: a conversation with Romanian super-builder Vitreolum [Interview]

We recently had the opportunity to talk with Pacurar Andrei, also known as Vitreolum (Letranger Absurde). Pacurar lives in Romania and builds in a wide range of styles and genres. His work is highly regarded and his build, Room with a View, made our short-list of the year’s best creations. Please walk with us as we explore the mind of a builder!

Jay and Silent Bob

TBB: How did you get into the LEGO hobby and what inspires you to build?

Pacurar Andrei: I got into the hobby when I decided to sell my childhood collection. They were all mixed together in two large bags, so I had to sort and build everything… by the time I was done with this I ended up buying sets instead of selling. Everything inspires me, from someone else’s build to things that surround me. Sometimes just looking at a certain part will be enough. Or just an idea that suddenly pops in my head. Although my biggest source of inspiration has always been movies, games and literature. The challenge is whether I can translate it into bricks.

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Batman, The Day of the Dead and Pickles: a chat with world-class LEGO builder Paul Hetherington [Interview]

We recently had the opportunity to talk with Paul Hetherington and take a tour inside his head to see how he invents such fantastic creations. Our readers will recognize him as the builder of our Creation of the Year 2016, Gotham Theater Showdown, but his creations span a much greater range in subject and technique than many people may realize. Let’s get to know Paul, shall we?

LEGO Artist, Self Portrait

TBB: Can you give us a little background on how you got into the LEGO hobby and what inspires you to build?

Paul: I’ve been into the LEGO hobby since before you could reasonably use the word “classic” to describe old space and castle sets. I bought my first set as an adult in 1991, which was the Space M-Tron Pulsar Charger. Little did I know back then that I had just taken the first step on an epic journey — one that would introduce me to so many amazing people, and have my LEGO creations be recognized around the world. Because back in 1991, as far as I knew, I was the only crazy adult who bought LEGO sets.

LEGO Sunday Afternoon Tea Train to Tetley

There are so many things that inspire me to build. My first creations were just built for my own enjoyment, as there was no way to share them. Then when the internet came along, all of a sudden a local LEGO club formed which I joined. From that point I had a reason to build. The first years of creating were mainly spent recreating local buildings, trains and hot rods for train shows and museums. I found I really enjoyed doing research to ensure that my creations were historically accurate and to scale. I soon became inspired to add some fantasy elements into my creations. I discovered Art Deco, Art Nouveau, and the works of Antoni Gaudi. Theme parks, Mardi Gras floats, and parades were also a great source of inspiration.
More recently, I had the pleasure to work with the artist Douglas Coupland on an installation and came to the realization that Lego has a place in the Art world. I find the Surrealists, especially Dali, and Pop Art, and Comic book art to be particularly inspiring. In recent years my creations have had more of an artistic twist and I see myself going more in that direction. Architecture will always be at the heart of what I do and is usually the catalyst for my creations.

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Issue 43 of BrickJournal is now shipping [News]

BrickJournal 43, highlighting many gaming-related articles and builds, is now available from TwoMorrows Publishing. The issue begins with a profile of Imagine Rigney, written by his mother, which tells their story as a family of LEGO fans and includes instructions for Rigney’s BioShock Songbird. (We covered another of Imagine’s incredible Bioshock LEGO creations just a few weeks ago). Ben Caulkins and TBB’s own Nick Jensen talk about their builds of iconic gaming weaponry and armor, followed by articles about models of Overwatch’s Winston and the Normandy from Mass Effect. Readers of TBB will also be happy to see an article by one of our editors, Chris Malloy, writing about how he built the first Minecraft layout.

BrickJournal 43

A nice collection of instructions show how you can build a Minecraft Creeper, Zelda’s Master Sword by Tommy Williamson, a Dagobah Swamp mini diorama by Christopher Deck and how to create a custom Battle Rancor with help from Jared Burks and Michael Marzilli.

The issue also includes a report from RoboCupJunior Australia (a robotics tournament including LEGO MINDSTORMS robots), a review of No Starch Press’ new book, Tiny LEGO Wonders, a spotlight of brickfilmer Marc André Caron, and a look at Ben Pitchford’s impressive samurai layout. As is the case with most BrickJournal issues, this one finishes up with Greg Hyland’s charming comic, AFOLs.

LEGO V.I.N.CENT. goes in, through...and beyond

Pascal explores the depths of space with this awesome rendition of V.I.N.CENT. (Vital Information Necessary CENTralized.) from Disney’s The Black Hole. The Black Hole has not aged well, in my opinion, but V.I.N.CENT. has always been one of my favorite movie robots. Pascal has managed to capture his essence quite well. You can almost hear Roddy McDowell’s voice coming over the speakers. The expression of the eyes and studless build technique are perfect. One also has to love the presentation, using the same black hole graphic as in the movie.

V.I.N.CENT

Built to protect and serve all through the night

Djordje is known for some really incredible LEGO figures and this night-watch Mech is no disappointment. Named Regulus after one of the brightest lights in the night sky and the brightest star in Leo, this mech stands on his own. The crisp color scheme gives the feel of a professional security detail, while the sturdy construction, over-sized revolver and no-nonsense stance let you know that this bot is up for anything. Cross him at your own risk!

REGULUS 02-GR

Banker’s abode

legostrator has built a very nicely detailed interior belonging to a banker. The scene is loaded with all sorts of cool bits but my favorites are the chair and the fireplace. I love the ornate nature of the chair. It’s a design that I may borrow in the future. The brickwork on the chimney is particularly nice, as is the arch above the fire. Everywhere I look in this small scene, I find more to like. This scene really has a lot going for it.

Bank Owner's Private Chamber

Sorcery is bad to the bone

This evil little floating rock was summoned into existence by Henry F, and it has a sinister feel that I love. The gray rocks have a cloud-like look that really makes them feel like they are floating, and the pillars give it a very elegant look. The genuflecting skeletons give it just the right amount of comic relief!

CCCXIV - The Three Pillars

This was built for Colossal Castle Contest XIV.

Hot diggety-dog!

For most people in my part of the world, grilling season is over. But nobu_tary brings back a taste of summer with this little treat. It is a deceptively simple build but the builder nailed it. I really like the use of bananas as the drizzle of mustard and the subtle curve of the “dog” in the bun. I may need to fire up the grill today and chase away the November rain!

Hotdog

Hair of red, gown of black

This brick-built figure by simply bricking it is really very striking. The choice of colors to highlight the hair of this figure is perfect, and the builder incorporated just the right number of greebles and unexpected LEGO parts into the build. It surprises without overwhelming and achieves the desired effect without overcrowding. I love it!

Redhead