Tag Archives: Town

Towns in the world of LEGO have everything cities in the real world do — police stations, fire engines, trains, hairdressers and veterinarians. Check out all the beautiful buildings and vehicles we’ve featured here on The Brothers Brick.

Moko builds a kebab stand in Japan

When I left Japan in 1989, I don’t think I’d ever seen any Middle Eastern or Mediterranean food — though Indian food was certainly popular (and a reliable choice for us vegetarians). Moko has built a kebab stand, though, and writes about it as though they’re on every street corner — as they certainly are in London and Berlin. How Japan has changed in the past quarter century, apparently!

Kebab shop

Moko says that kebab shops are most often on the first floor of multistory buildings, but that he was most interested in building the rotating gyro meet, the sauces on the counter, and the sign, so he just built those and moved on. Despite the lack of an upper story, it’s a lovely little shop. One’s eye is inevitably drawn to the excellent lettering on the large sign, but my favorite detail is the striped green awning.

Larry’s hot rod is a perfect combo of old and new

One of the many wonderful things about LEGO is how almost all of the parts produced over multiple decades are compatible. Several years ago, when building a fish & chips shop, I was able to use a parasol, 25 years after I got it as a part of a set that was a gift for my 8th birthday. Another great example is visible on the hot rod built by Larry Lars.

Red Hot Lego Vehicle

Builders of real-world hot rods often combine an old body with a shiny new engine. Similarly, Larry uses mudguards and brand new wheels from the speed champions sets and recently introduced curved parts with a part that is even older than my parasol: the roof from a Fabuland car. It is a perfect combination.

A true Legoland Theme Park: 100% LEGO

Pro building team Olive Seon are back it with another magnificent brick-built beauty; this time a theme park. The awesome high-flying roller coaster really ties the model together, and also gives you a sense of scale for just how small most LEGO dioramas really are. As per usual with these builders, there is a lot to look at and loads of fun little details to spy. My favorites are the LEGO Architecture line buildings used for a miniland within the park.

Saturday Morning Car Show

Nothing quite like getting up early on a Saturday, and heading over to the local car show, right? I may not be able to tell you the vehicle’s year by sight or tell you the engine specs, but I do like a good, classic car with sleek lines. It’s got to be pretty.

Firas Abu-Jaber brings us a delightful selection of beautifully built cars, so this morning, you don’t have to get up early. All you have to do is take a peak at his photostream and you’ll be good to go.

Mercedes-Benz Rennwagen Schnelltransprter

My collection

If the zombie apocalypse happens, you’ll want one of these

Skid-steer loaders are very versatile pieces of construction equipment, by virtue of their many different attachments such as blades, cutters, trenchers and snow blowers.

Skid Steer by sinan bitişik

This brilliant little model by Sinan Bitişik does not include any zombies, but looking at the gnarly attachment to its front, evidently intended for cutting asphalt, I could not help but think of an alternative use.

Red Lion Station – 1940’s Train Station

Red Lion Station in LEGO 001

This is Cale Leiphart and he likes trains, and I’ve had the pleasure of meeting and enjoying his builds for many years now. His latest culmination of train-awesomeness is the Red Lion Station, and is a model of the Maryland & Pennsylvania RR train station and surrounding areas.

At over 3.5 x 17 feet (that’s 5 meters), this requires adjectives which I do not posses to describe the incredible feat. That’s not to say there haven’t been larger builds, but I have a hard time recalling a build of this size that has this much detail packed in. Not only does each of the buildings have a beautiful facade, but each building has a fully decked out interior. It’s so large it’s incredibly hard to even photograph, and is one of those builds that are best enjoyed in person at a display:
Red Lion Station in LEGO 003

I really liked how Cale has gone against the grain and built buildings and streets at non-right angles, a non-trivial feat, to build off-axis roads and buildings:
Red Lion Station in LEGO 004
Not only are the roads difficult to build at an angle, most people would have simply laid the train track on top of the road to avoid complicated brickwork, but Mr. Leiphart, true to form, built it inside the road with some really clever brick work.

As I mentioned before, I had seen earlier versions of this layout last year and it really caught my eye. By catch my eye, I mean I did a double take and went OH-MY-G-O-S-H. Again the size is impressive, but I’m a detail guy, and this nondescript grey building blew my mind. Take a closer look at the sides, it’s not just nicely stacked brick, it’s made up of panels, hundreds of panels attached in some seemingly magical way. Despite being very late on the first setup night, Cale – who was still setting up this magnificent display – noticed our fevered interest and stopped everything and came over to us and showed us the secret of the grey building. This became my number 1 cool must-see thing at BrickFair that year.

Check out the full photo collection here.

Dining in style

Spring has only just started (on the Northern hemisphere), but the restaurant built by Snaillad already makes me long for summer.

The Ocean Restaurant

This must be because it was inspired by the wonderful art deco buildings along Ocean Drive / South Beach in famously sunny Miami Beach. It looks very nice on the outside and also comes with a detailed interior. Normally I am partial to visible studs on a LEGO model, but I have to admit that this would not look nearly as good if it wouldn’t have such a clean and studless construction.