Tag Archives: Technic

The LEGO Technic line was first released as “Expert Builder” sets in 1977, and LEGO has been producing Technic ever since, including Bionicle and MINDSTORMS. The custom Technic models featured here on The Brothers Brick include some pretty crazy and amazing mechanisms that’ll blow your mind, from self-sorting LEGO to automated Rubik’s Cube solvers.

LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS officially revealed + LEGO Designer Interview [News]

LEGO and Porsche have announced the brand new LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS, the new flagship model for the Technic line. It will have 2,704 pieces, and will be available starting June 1 via LEGO.com and select LEGO stores in Germany and Austria. It will see wider release in retail stores beginning in August. It will retail for $299 USD.

42056 LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Click for more pictures and information

Dragonfly future-cycle

Don’t let the wings fool you, this isn’t a flying mech. It’s a three-wheeled cycle from the mind of Vince Toulouse. It’s not often I see a vehicle that looks truly unique, but this one definitely fits the bill, making great use of those Hailfire Droid wheels and Ant-man insect wings while somehow achieving a great retro-futuristic panache. Look closely and you’ll spot a rare Belleville crown as a decorative detail, and even notice that this isn’t minifig scale; instead it seats a Technic figure.

Rolling Bug

Rolling Bug

4-foot-long LEGO Technic ER-1250 bucket wheel excavator [Video]

The ER-1250 was a massive bucket wheel excavator designed for surface mining in the Soviet Union in the mid-20th century. The tracked vehicle stood taller than an 8-story building. Brilliant Russian Technic builder Kirill has built a minifig-scale version of this behemoth that stands 56 cm tall and 123 cm long, and weighs 7.8 kg. That’s over 4 feet long, nearly 2 feet tall, and more than 17 pounds.

LEGO Technic ER-1250 bucket wheel excavator

Even more than with his previously featured Ice Planet “Elephant” and snow rover, Kirill has built a huge amount of functionality into his vehicle using 14 Power Functions motors, 6 IR receivers, 2 regular battery boxes, and 2 rechargeable (lithium) battery boxes. Working features include fully steerable tracks, superstructure rotation, rotating bucket wheel, conveyer belts, elevating booms, and more.

Click through to watch the video and see more photos!

LEGO Technic 42056 Porsche & other Technic sets revealed at Nuremburg toy show [News]

Thanks to flickr user Jim van Gulik, we now have photos of several of LEGO’s newest big Technic sets (see the others after the jump). We can’t confirm the precise set name yet, but it’s set number 42056, and is a Porsche 911 wrapped in zebra test patterns (used by auto manufacturers to disguise the outlines of an unreleased vehicle). Some sources say that the test pattern will not be included in the final model, though. You can bet that this will be an expensive set, clocking in well over $100 USD.

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HobbyMedia brings us this 360 view, as well:

Click through to see more new sets

Oh! What fun it is to ride in an Arctic Truck Mk II!

Well, the winter holidays are long gone, but Kirill doesn’t want the outdoor fun disappear. So, here is his Arctic Truck Mk II – an ultimate snow-rover in the scale of a regular Technic minifigure. One may find the exterior quite plain, but Technic vehicles are all about functionality.

Arctic snowmobile Total weight – 2650 g, dimensions – 40 x 31 x 18 cm, clearance – 4.8 cm.

Check out this video to see this impressive crawler in action.

And I can’t help mentioning a couple of the builder’s other models.

Click to see more great Technic vehicles by this builder

LEGO skating penguin sculpture

Jason and Kristal from JK Brickworks continue to pump out amazing mechanical inventions created using LEGO. When last we featured them it was with Jason’s holiday cookie decorating robot, but today’s creation comes from Kristal and is a delightful little skating penguin.

The heart of the moving sculpture is a Trammel of Archimedes, a mechanism that traces out an ellipse. This is usually used to make “useless machines” such as the mischevious black box that JK Brickworks created a few years ago.

Full instructions for your own Happy Feet are available right here.

When made out of LEGO you are, look as good, you will not

Serbian builder Djordje really is one of the best in the game when it comes to capturing characters in LEGO, as this model of Yoda demonstrates. From the ears made of green Kraata, to the upper lip recreated with a single flipper, to (my favourite) the entirety of his robes made with two technic lift arms. It’s. Just. So. Clever.

Grand Master Yoda

Reaching higher with Beat Felber

Since mid-October I have had a pretty crazy time at work, very much at the expense of my blogging and pretty much everything else. I have built a few things, but I told my fellow contributors that I would only write something if it knocked my socks off. Well, consider me barefoot. The culprit is Swiss builder Beat Felber and his AR-1200M Mobile Crane. Tadano is a Japanese manufacturer of cranes and the model carries a Japanese livery, of the Showa Co., Ltd. of Kobe. This already makes it a bit more interesting than your average Liebherr. Furthermore, as you would expect from a builder who goes by the name Engineering with ABS, his model is full of working features.

Tadano AR-1200M Mobile Crane 05

It uses Power functions for the drive, for steering on all five axles and to extend the stabilisers on both sides, with pneumatics used to raise and lower the struts. The crane boom can be raised, slewed and extended using Power Functions and, of course, the winches are remote-controlled. It also has working lights. The boom reaches a height of 2.15 m (more than 7 ft.) and can be extended even further by adding a separate jib. This is not the tallest crane we’ve ever blogged, but size is not everything. It is gorgeous.

Kinetic sculpture of Sisyphus built from LEGO

We’ve come to expect great things from Jason Allemann, a talented builder who combines strong LEGO engineering skills with a great artistic flair. Back in 2013, we featured his post-apocalyptic Strandbeest and last month jaws all over the world hit the floor with his working combination safe. Jason’s latest build takes its inspiration from Greek mythology, with the cursed Sisyphus rolling that awful rock up the hill throughout eternity.

Sisyphus Kinetic Sculpture

In addition to the main model, the base itself includes brick-built bas relief sculptures.

Sisyphus Kinetic Sculpture - Details

You can see the model’s moving features, along with comments from the builder himself, in this video Jason made:

Working combination safe built from LEGO

Jason Allemann has used nothing but LEGO to build a fully functional combination safe. Not only does the safe lock with a three-number combination, Jason has designed the safe so that the safe itself cannot be removed from its outer case and opened without either knowing the combination or physically breaking LEGO pieces!

Working LEGO Combination Safe

A picture doesn’t really prove it, so here’s Jason’s amazing video.

If you want to build you own LEGO safe, you can download instructions from Jason’s website.

Spinput GBC

Great Ball Contraptions (GBCs) are a staple of most LEGO conventions, the idea is simple create: a mechanical device to move balls from point A to point B, with a certain set standard. Then sit back and watch a) balls go flying b) kids be mesmerized for hours. It’s a challenging feet of engineering to create a mechanism that can withstand hours of continuous operation, typically the most prized honour for a GBC builder is the ‘Most Reliable’ award (or some variant). Unlike a lot of LEGO builds we see on The Brothers Bricks, aesthetics is not primary goal.

But sometimes, someone steps forward and combines all the above, and makes it beautiful, just cause. For example, Benjamin Corey (Bricktech) built this gorgeous GBC at BFVA this year:

Spinput
You can watch it in action here:

You can also check out the whole GBC video from our friends at Beyond the Brick.