Category Archives: Models

This is what we’re all about. We scour the web for the best custom LEGO models to share with you. From castles and spaceships to planes, trains, and automobiles, you’ll find the best LEGO creations from builders all over the world right here on The Brothers Brick.

Hello ladies, it’s me, Deadpool

Now I know you’re thinking: “What? Is it Sunday already?” Not exactly. This year, Valentine’s Day came a bit early just for you—the gift? Me, Deadpool; up on the big screen for the first time today and this screen for the second time. It’s a lot of me to handle, I understand. But if you’re not up for my movie, we could just stay here and lie down by the fire…I got chimichangas in the kitchen…interested?
I'm Deadpool!

A rover a day keeps the space physician away

Frost is churning out a small army of new rovers for this year’s FebRovery challenge. He’s posted a new one each day this month and will, presumably, have created twenty-nine of them by the time FebRovery is over and done with. So far, his rovers have spanned several building styles and themes. His most recent build is a race rover with beautiful angles and a very impressive spoiler.

Febrovery 2016 Day 11

Frost’s other builds include forklift-style loading rover, several construction-themed rovers, and my favorite, a shark-controlled survey rover Check out all his rovers on Flickr.

The Bricks Awaken with these life-size LEGO Star Wars figures made from 83,364 pieces [News]

If minifigs just aren’t big enough for you, LEGO has created three life-size sculptures celebrating Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Poe stands 67.3 inches tall, weighs 112 pounds, and took builders 195 hours to place all 22,736 bricks. Finn also weighs 112 pounds, but took builders 205 hours to place all 23,072 bricks in his 68.9 inch stature. And true to the movie, Captain Phasma is huge at 81.5 inches tall, and weighs 185 pounds. She took builders 275 hours and 37,556 bricks to construct.

LEGO Star Wars Life Size Sculptures

Click through to see more images

LEGO Deadpool, bricks without a mouth

With Deadpool finally being released either today or tomorrow (depending on where you live and when you read this), the world looks like it’s finally getting the Deadpool movie we’ve all wanted. To coincide with this, Jonas has recreated the, erm, lower half of the merc with a mouth. And if you need more Deadpool before watching Deadpool, may I present to you Deadpool as reviewed by Deadpool. Deadpool.

Deadpool

Resisting arrest?

When you’re scouting for things worth blogging, it’s easy for your head to get turned by enormous creations or complex builds. However, sometimes it can be a relatively simple model in a good composition which catches the eye. This neat diorama from city.s is a great example of how a clean building style, decent photography, and a touch of humor can create an arresting image (pun absolutely intended)…

Everyone knows red cars get pulled over more often

The color contrast in the picture is excellent, with the red of the “resistance piece car” really popping against the blue sky backdrop. And the brick-built vehicle itself and the road surface are nicely done. But the choice of face for the Emmett minifig was the touch of detail which made me smile. And, when it comes down to it, surely that’s what a LEGO creation is for?

2-foot tall Striker Eureka from Pacific Rim built from 5,000 LEGO pieces

As often as we feature LEGO mecha here on The Brothers Brick (and make excuses for doing so), I’d really love to see more of the massive, kaiju-hunting Jaegers from Pacific Rim. A couple years ago, Jason Corlett built a monstrous LEGO Cherno Alpha at micro-fig scale (the tiny one-piece figures that come in LEGO games and sets like the Shield Helicarrier), and he’s just followed that up with the Australian Jaeger Striker Eureka.

Striker Eureka

Striker Eureka stands 2 feet 8 inches tall (81 cm) and 18 inches wide (46 cm), and is built from more than 5,000 LEGO pieces. Jason says he spent 86 hours on the build.

Click through for more of this massive LEGO Jaeger!

Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it

Not all LEGO creations are built with the goal of becoming world-famous masterpieces. Some models are created simply to share a couple of neat building techniques. This is one special category where you can come across some particularly brilliant exhibits, which have nothing to do with huge dioramas or horribly complicated mechanisms, but which still demand your attention. And Jonas Wide‘s Oleander house is exactly that kind of build.

Oleander house

I imagine most of us have tried building a shabby brick wall at least once. About 10 years ago it was a fairly difficult task. But with the arrival of dark red plates and bricks with masonry patterns, even a beginner can now manage some authentic-looking walls for their town or fortress. But Jonas throws some multi-layered techniques into the mix, to make it look as if the wall gradually deteriorated over the years. Simply beautiful, isn’t it?

A brick-built home: incredible LEGO modern kitchen

Tim Schwalfenberg is trying to fool us with this kitchen photograph, which appears to be a gorgeous modern kitchen in an upscale home decor magazine. Look closely, though, and you’ll notice that it is completely LEGO. There are lots of great details here, but I like the train wheels for barstool cushions, and the tiled backsplash, which just looks perfectly realistic.

What's Cooking?

And if you enjoy large-scale modern home interiors made of LEGO, then you’ll definitely want to check out Littlehaulic’s builds:

Modern kitchen and dining room
Modern bedroom and den
Full beach house interior

The most dangerous hunt: Cretaceous trophies

When building a LEGO collection, one often accumulates many special pieces – unique trinkets destined for greatness, or the closest special parts bin. What you may not know however is that these pieces are special to your minifigures too – special enough to hang in some short of ghoulish trophy room to be stared at with smokey-depressed-retirement eyes:

Adventures End

TBB mainstay Paddy Bricksplitter knows this, as does ‘Old Johnny’; together they created one viciously intriguing trophy room overflowing with story potential. And oh what a story it was! Clearly this time, it was the T-Rex who should have run!

Even in LEGO, Mr. Bean travels in comfort

Brothers Brick contributor Elspeth De Montes puts the new Series 15 Collectible Minifigures mop to great use in this iconic scene from the quintessential British comedy show, Mr. Bean. Mr. Bean can’t fit all his new purchases into his adorable green Mini, so he jury-rigs a device to drive his car from the supple luxury of his rooftop recliner.

Mr Bean & his Mini

If you’ve missed the sketch before, check it out:

Porsche 911 GT3 has never looked so good

Building iconic sport cars is especially challenging due to a limited number or ways one can use to make the model recognizable. Moreover, eventually thousands of versions from different builders simply start to repeat one another. But Malte Dorowski sets the bar with the first photo of his album devoted to the new model of Porsche 911 GT3.

LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0

I think I would have left Malte’s car unnoticed if it wasn’t for an astonishing picture of the detailed inside. Detailed brake calipers, engine and red roll cage are truly outstanding and look a lot like those in collectible scaled models of cars.

LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0

Blacktron II: Combat Evolved

It’s rare that I find LEGO Halo builds which deliberately stray from an exact replica of the source material. That’s one reason why I like what Stephan Niehoff created with his mash-up of Halo’s iconic Scorpion tank and LEGO’s own Blacktron II theme. Another reason: the mash-up works beautifully.

Scorpion II

Stephan has also been working other Blacktron II creations, such as this great spaceship landing pad. See his Blacktron II series and more pictures of Scorpion II in this album.

Part 1