Category Archives: Models

This is what we’re all about. We scour the web for the best custom LEGO models to share with you. From castles and spaceships to planes, trains, and automobiles, you’ll find the best LEGO creations from builders all over the world right here on The Brothers Brick.

Relaxing in the green room

OK, so this LEGO green room may not be the waiting area for celebrities, but chances are it’s also a lot homier. This modest den accentuated with emerald tapestries is yet another of Jonas Kramm‘s fantastic uses for the Duplo grass element. Look closely, and you’ll spy the unwieldy element in two distinct applications, but don’t miss all the other wonderful details while you’re searching, from the bearskin rug to the agave plant made of alligator tails.

Green Lounge

Jonas built this lovely den for the Iron Builder contest, where he continues to make excellent work of the Duplo seed element, having previously used it as a flying carpet and the roof of whimsical huts.

Bat-rules are made to be broken

We all know Batman only builds in black, and sometimes in very, very dark grey. But it seems like he’s made an exception to his rule, and it turned out pretty sweet. We have to thank Lucas for giving the Batmobile from Dawn of Justice a new shade — even if the light grey sees it remains at the darker end of the spectrum. A little something special for Comish Gordon too — a redesigned Bat-Signal in the same hue.

A Darker Knight

Life is like a box of chocolates

Remember that feeling when you open a brand new box of fresh chocolates and you can’t decide which one to try first? That was exactly my first impression when I came across John Snyder‘s box of LEGO sweets. Glossy tiles and dishes are coupled with thick white rubber bands, and the results really look like actual chocolate — from milk chocolate (in tan) through to rich dark bitter morsels (in dark brown). And best of all, the model has fabulous presentation — capturing the box on a dinner table with some sweets in a glass bowl.

Sumptuous Sweets

Wide-mouthed fighter will make you smile

A flying cement truck doesn’t sound like a great idea, yet Damien Labrousse has used LEGO’s concrete mixer parts to great effect in his Basking Shark Fighter. The gaping air intakes might grab your initial attention, but you’ll linger over the whip-smart colour scheme, and the wonderful angles of the rest of the fuselage.

Baskingshark

The angular styling reminds me of the funky geometry of the fictional MiG-31 “Firefox”, from the Clint Eastwood movie of the same name, but it’s those massive engines which lend this little fighter a big character all of its own.

Baskingshark

Remember, beauty is found within

The Beast’s rose by Anonymous Brick is not the first LEGO rose we’ve seen, and with recent release of the live-action version of Beauty and the Beast, I’m sure it won’t be the last. The flower’s petals, made from minifigure capes, are excellent and very natural looking, as is the nicely curved stalk. A great detail is the fallen petals, making the rose look unique. My only issue is with the model’s base, which may be a little too simple, but overall this is a beautiful LEGO creation.

Beast's Rose: Beauty and the Beast

You want to know what I was before all this? I was nobody. Nothing.

Fans of the graphic novels or the AMC show will appreciate these Walking Dead LEGO creations by Jonas Obermaier. The first scene features everyone’s favorite post-apocalyptic redneck, Daryl Dixon. Jonas created a sleek motorcycle for Daryl that has just enough detail (look, there’s even some chrome!) to look like a million bucks. He also turned out Daryl’s legs for a more natural pose.

Daryl Dixon's bike

Jonas’s other Walking Dead build is a gruesome scene featuring Negan. There are a lot of interesting building techniques here, but what I love most is the ribbed hose (cut into strips) used to enhance Negan’s bat. And word on the street is that Jonas is working on a larger Walking Dead display for ComicCon Germany, so we should be seeing even more Walking Dead LEGO very soon!

Negan

The one that didn’t get away

Many people build animals out of LEGO, but mostly they call them something general, like “fish” or “bird”. But every now and then there is a creation like this rainbow trout by Lino Martins, which is very much specific. While the construction is simple for the most part, the trout has all the details that it needs. I knew exactly what it was just from the thumbnail, so that has to stand for something!

LEGO Rainbow Trout

Explore the moon in this tin (tin) tank

What better way to explore the lunar surface than in a LEGO version of TinTin’s moon tank? Stefan Johansson has nailed Herge’s classic design, notable for its twin bubble cockpits upfront. The tank’s blue and grey colour scheme is accurate, and it’s making we wonder if the original comic strip from the 50s provided any inspiration for LEGO’s original Space theme? Stefan has included figures of Professor Calculus, the Thompson Twins, Captain Haddock, and TinTin himself, all clad in fetching orange spacesuits. All that’s missing is Snowy the dog popping his head up under one of the domes.

TinTin moon tank

Who winds up the watchmen?

The LEGO watchmen stalk the streets, keeping their eye on a wary citizenry. Dwalin Forkbeard‘s sinister steam-driven sentinel would like to remind you that if you’re behaving in accordance with the law then you have nothing to fear from their oversight. This is great steampunk/clockpunk building. I love the use of the welding mask, the twin-barrel blasters as control sticks, and of course, the design of those fabulous spindly legs. But the highlight of this model for me is the wonderful streetlight.

Colonial Watchman

Dwalin says he took inspiration from the Tallboys of the Dishonered videogame. I recognise this in some of the elements, but I also think this has a nice clanky style all of its own.

Mixing up the LEGO ingredients

Great LEGO building isn’t all spaceships and robots and Star Wars you know. Josiah N. cooks us up a beautiful domestic kitchen scene, which includes some excellent little touches. The rolling pin on the worktop, the white croissant as a curl of stray icing oozing from the pipe, and the classic design of the radio — all great. But the undoubted main attraction here is that mixer, and the clever use of an inverted knight’s helmet as the mixing bowl. Not just imaginative parts usage, it fits perfectly into the scene and looks fabulous.

A Baker's Dream

Space pod arriving at Martian Outpost, please mind the gap

I’m fairly sure this LEGO “Martian Outpost” is a human outpost on Mars rather than a place for Martians to hang out. The dark orange-red environment in this diorama by KW Vauban certainly looks like Mars to me, and there’s a lot of action despite the microscale size of the build. Centrally, a railed transport vehicle approaches a shelter — suggesting we are seeing only a small portion of a much larger habitat. My favourite part? The sliding doors closing behind the ‘space saucer’ that has just left an underground area. I want to peek inside those doors to see what’s down below!

Martian Outpost

There’s a whole story in this microscale diorama, but the builder hasn’t given us any extra information — just this smart little snapshot in time.

I’d like a Happy Meal, and some Brickheadz to go

These cute incarnations of famous fast food characters by Eric Mok in LEGO Brickheadz fashion are a tasty treat. Ronald Mcdonald’s hairdo is spot-on, as are his clothes, right down to his collars. Eric has managed to sneak in the signature arches on Birdie’s outfit, and Hamburglar’s tie even spots a burger-like printed element. And as if the figures weren’t enough, the base stands are shaped like mouth-watering cheeseburgers.

Mcdonalds Brickheadz 2

If I was in McDonalds marketing, I’d be trying to figure out how to mass-produce these for a Happy Meal giveaway promo.