About Chris

Chris Malloy (porschecm2) has been a LEGO fan nearly all his life, having started with System bricks at age 3. He's been active in the online community since 2002, variously enjoying the lively families at FBTB, Classic-Space, Classic-Castle, Builder's Lounge, and Forbidden-Cove. In 2011, he finally made it to his first convention, Brickcon. He enjoys building in a wide range of themes, but keeps returning to Castle, Space, and Pirates. He has been a member of the LEGO Ambassador program since 2010. His flickr account can be found here.

Posts by Chris

Glide the waves with ease

Daniel Church takes a slick approach to future sea travel with this cool little skiff. My favorite part is how the wedge plates angling with one another make a striking visual motif that really brings this model together. The addition of the dock and particularly the style of the lamppost lend a bit of context to the craft and the world it inhabits.

Breeze's Heir

LEGO Star Wars 75060 Slave I [Review]

The good folks over at LEGO sent us an advance copy of the new flagship set for the ever-popular LEGO Star Wars line, 75060 Slave I. Ever since I first saw Star Wars Episode V, I’ve thought the Slave I was one of the coolest ships in the Star Wars fleet. A truly unique design for a spaceship (in 1980 when Empire released), the Slave I lies on its back for landing, but stands upright for flight, the cockpit and wings rotating to retain orientation. LEGO has released 4 previous minifig-scale versions of this ship, two for each color scheme from the new and old Star Wars trilogies, plus another five versions in smaller scales. So this new Slave I fittingly is the tenth version of the ship from LEGO, and is unquestionably the best.

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Make no mistake, this is a big set — a very big set for being minifig scale. The Slave I is a deceptively large ship, and LEGO’s previous minifig-scale versions have not done it justice. The very first Slave I (7144) released in 2000 was almost laughably small at 166 pieces, but I still harbor fond memories of it. The new 75060 Slave I clocks in with 1996 pieces and is almost 2 feet long from tip to tip.

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It’s a beautiful world out there in LEGO-land

We usually focus directly on LEGO models that people have created, but I always enjoy seeing fans use LEGO as the subject for their photography skills as well. Flickr user Young_Design has been creating a series of photographs which I love, featuring minifigs in gorgeous settings with great lighting. A good eye, a nice macro lens, and a little photoshopping skill can bring a viewer right into a minifig’s compelling world.

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avengers vs dc
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dragon

Architecture: Curving away from the norm

Traditional architecture with right angles and straight walls are commonplace in LEGO cities, since the brick naturally lends itself to that style. Less common are modern buildings with curving walls, but flickr user lisqr manages quite well here with the clever implementation of curved train tracks to set the structure for this wavy edifice.

Pirate 100

Angular momentum makes quick work of space battles

This crazy cool Vic Viper version by Rancorbait is chock full of sweet angles and great color blocking. The builder deftly applies some of the new angular slopes LEGO’s been producing in recent years, and the result is spectacular. I particularly love the clever use of this piece down the front of each side, which is so well integrated that I almost didn’t notice it. Overall, this ship looks like a combination of something from Tron: Legacy and LEGO’s own classic Blacktron theme.

Vic Viper Steel Storm (2)

Magma City: A town with a lava problem

South Korean professional LEGO building quartet Olive Seon are known for their massive city dioramas. This latest city is having the disturbing problem of being built above a river of lava. The airtanker in the middle of dumping water is a terrific image, and adds a huge amount of dynamism to this diorama, and I always appreciate that the builders include a lot of below-ground details.

Magma City

Warhammer 40K tank on a roll

In the spirit of that old Imperial saying, Victory is achieved through mettle. Glory is achieved through metal, comes this beast of a tank. The Vindicator will stop at nothing to crush its opponents, and flickr user Slnine has done a bang-up job with this LEGO version. While the builder is careful to point out that he took inspiration from some previous models, his version is still super cool and quite a feat.