Tag Archives: Diorama

There’s nothing like a massive LEGO diorama to prove that you’ve arrived as a LEGO builder. The LEGO dioramas we feature here span everything from realistic medieval castles to scenes from World War II, and more than a few post-apocalyptic wastelands.

Fracture – a of tale of two towers

I don’t build castles often, but I love looking at them, and what’s better than one castle? Two Castles… together! Castle uber builders Asimon481 and ZCerberus teamed up to create this wonderful 80 x 288 stud diorama:

Colab angle
It’s another great example of builders coming together to achieve awesomeness. The layout is actually comprised of three separate pieces that flow seamlessly together:
CollabDisplay

Check out some of the great details here.

Friday Night Fights – Say Cheese!

Welcome back fight fans, to Sin City Nevada, USA for another round of Friday Night Fights! Tonight we’re going a bit cheesy – cheese wedges that is. Our contenders have been throwing around the cheese all month, posting a build a day using the humble Slope 30 1 x 1 x 2/3. Let’s go to the tale of the tape.

In the blue corner, we have Grant Davis who gives us a brilliant rendition of Chinese Checkers:
Cheesy Chinese Checkers - Day 29

In the red corner, we have Eli Willsea who give us one of the coolest cheese wedge floor mosaics I’ve seen in awhile:
Cheese Break-in - Day 2

As usual, constant reader, you are tasked with deciding who’s the cheesier builder by way of comment. On the last edition of Friday Night Fights, Steampunk Rifles, Monster wins 9-1. Tune in next week for another action packed edition of Friday Night Fights!

Mr. Stay Puft’s okay! He’s a sailor, he’s in New York...

As excited as we all are to see the very cool Ghostbusters CUUSOO set finally hit the shelves, wouldn’t it be even cooler if it came with a street to drive down, or some ghosts to fight? Korean building team OliveSeon realized this, and they went and did something about it…

Arca: Consummation, Cultivation,and Corruption

Arca is a story told by three builders: Max Pointner, Ian Spacek, and Paul Vermeesch about a dying planet where the inhabitants cultivate a little basket of life – Arca – and created a glittering city only to see corruption seep in.
Arca: Consummation
The overall construction of this build is extremely clever, an upside down Ziggurat with some fantastic transitions between a lush garden zone and dark cubes areas. I am having a hard time deciding if I like the little green house more, or the extremely complicated and interesting corrupted cube structure:

Arca: CultivationArca: Corruption

But what impresses me about this build, isn’t the interesting back story that they had developed or the quality and execution of the build itself, but the seamless manner in which three separate builders could create a single uniform build. I’ve had the pleasure of being in several collaborations over the years, but I have never been a part of something so tightly integrated. Though this isn’t the first time the three have collaborated on build – last SHIPtember they managed to some how build 1/3 of a SHIP each.

Thankfully Max has provided a bit of a behind the scenes on how they approached and executed the Arca Project for those looking at joining forces to do a collaboration build like this.

A Tavern Market for a Fair Day

This stately house of drink stands guard above a lovely quayside village market. Flickr user Gary^The^Procrastinator has done an excellent job polishing the diorama and inserting just enough bright colors to make it come alive. It’s always good to remember how important scale is to creating realistic models: an official LEGO tavern would probably sit on an 8 inch footprint, but this model is closer to 30×15 inches. This gives it room to breathe and encompass detail without becoming crowded.

Black Swan Tavern on Market Day

Over the Moon

Polish builder Michał Kaźmierczak is no stranger to massive LEGO dioramas, and we are no stranger to him either – you can read about his lava-bound space base and Indiana Jones temple adventure right here. So what could be more suitable to a large-scale LEGO treatment from Michał than the epic landscape of the moon Pandora from the 2009 movie Avatar?

I particularly like Michał’s use of the waterfalls to solve the problem of the Pandora’s airborne mountains (which can float due to high concentrations of superconducting Unobtainium ore interacting with the moon’s magnetic fields something something something science reasons). And for scale, the diorama even includes a microscale version of the Dragon assault ship:

Valencia – a Hangar to call home

Far too often I see fantastic Sci-Fi vehicles that are presented itself either on a plan backdrop or photoshopped background.

So it’s always refreshing and awe inspiring when Keith Goldman (Don Quixote 2×4!) posts one of his epic dioramas with a fully brick built background:
Valencia [1/4]

Not to be satisfied with just a great ship, Keith takes it to the next level by building a home for his ship, complete with fantastic hexagon floor (based off of Tim G’s design) and classic-Goldman back lit wall.

This Creation Looks Like It Belongs in a Landfill

If ever there were a LEGO creation that looked like it was straight from a landfill, this is it. (And I mean that in the best possible way.) As the second industrialization-gone-awry model this week, Nooreuyed’s creation features some terrific looking brick trash and a great bit of forced perspective.

Industrial Waste by Nooreuyed on Flickr