Tag Archives: Mech

This mech tikis all the boxes

Marin Stipkovic brings us a mech with a lot of personality as part of the year long Mech Monday project. Inspired by the art of Taylor Schmidt, King Aku is a LEGO creation that has the feel of a tiki idol brought to life. It features tons of articulation, an expressive tiki idol face, and bold colors highlighted by the shine of gold. Another nice detail is how Marin didn’t just repeat the use of 1×1 round plate for all the teeth. He’s added visual interest by mixing in inverted 1×5 Technic plates. Partially obscured by the black brick of the mouth, those 1×5 plates take on the look of a brand new part. (I mistook them for Sweet Mayhem’s legs at first.)

Mech Monday #24: King Aku

Marin has also shared a short video that shows off the range of motion of this mech as well as its cool play feature. (Spoiler alert: Light and sound!)

Put up your dukes

We love a scrappy fighter, and in this case a fighter literally made of scraps. Johann Dakitsch’s plucky LEGO brawler has been pieced together by a fascinating array of specialist elements. Its skeleton is formed from mainly grey parts, which hints at pneumatic power and intricate gearing. The coloured outer casing looking to all the world like the shorts and shirt worn to the gym. Topping it off, the mean robot boxer’s rooster Mohawk and studded knuckle-dusters suggests he might not fight according to gentleman’s rules.

boxingmech

An Atlas to take your personnel further

Sometimes I come across LEGO builds that add a new wrinkle to my brain as I’m scanning all the details while trying to spot all the exquisite parts uses. Markus Rollbühler tends to be a name synonymous with said builds. His newest addition to Mech Monday, #22: ATLAS – Multipurpose Carrier, is absolutely no exception. The first question I thought was, “Where do I start?” and the first elements to grab me were the Minifig Jet Pack and 1×1 Decorated Tile with Telephone Speaker Pattern. That combination is pure greeble at a tiny scale. Next, the new(ish) Minifig Blaster with studs on all sides. Not only did they get used for legs, they were also used for its well-armored head stock. It took me a few seconds of admiring Bucket Handles and Minifig Hands, to realise Markus is even hiding segments from a Yoda Wristwatch for the mech’s back.

Mech Monday #22: ATLAS – Multipurpose Carrier

All of that without even mentioning the paint job. The militarised tone is well balanced between its shell of sand green and its industrial framework of bluish greys. Add some touches of Dark Tan into the mix and its complete. I am curious to see it in other colour schemes though–adaptations for different purposes perhaps?

If you missed it, check out Markus Rollbühler’s last LEGO Mech we featured.

The massive mech of your nightmares

If you’re looking for a video game villain to rule all, look no further. Anthony Wilson’s centipede mech will leave you squirming in your seat. This thing is filled will all sorts of nasty, from its menacing claws to what can only be described as egg-filled hatchling pods. The overall color scheme is phenomenal and the parts usage is superb.

Centipede - Plague Mech: Omicron

Every inch of the build is filled with cool techniques, from its numerous varying legs, up its spine, and to its terrifying head, complete with serrated swords for pinchers. The design truly brings it to life. Now, it’s important to realize how big this thing is. It would be scary enough small, but it’s over 50 studs tall, not including the upper arms. That’s 40+ centimeters, or nearly a foot and a half. Imagine if it was human scale compared to a minifig. Shudder.

Centipede (Extra View)

Posing is everything when taking pictures of a build like this, and Anthony has nailed it here. While it’s a completely different kind of build, he also did a great job posing his coffee-loving dragon.

Tougher than crocodile skin

Crocodiles are one of the toughest animals on the planet. Makes sense, considering their ancestors were around during prehistoric times. So why not create a mech in their image? This excellent mecha croc by Mitsuru Nikaido is one of the coolest I’ve seen. All of the plating and fine detail make for a handsome and fierce opponent.

LEGO Mecha Crocodile Mk2-04

As a big animal person, I’m always impressed by lifelike body-shaping, and I’m not sure it could be done better here, especially considering it uses a plethora of pieces to give it that mech look. To me, that seems more difficult than building a realistic croc. I love everything about that head, including the lever based used for the eye. The back legs and perfect taper of the tail are also noteworthy.

LEGO Mecha Crocodile Mk2-06

Mitsuru Nikaido is no stranger to impressive animal mechs. Just take a look at his chameleon (scroll down), lemur, dragonfly, and crane and grasshopper duo.

A tank head full of ideas

Kelvin Low’s latest LEGO creation brings to life a turret-headed mech based on original artwork by Emerson Tung. Taking inspiration from a number of classic tank elements, the Kaiserian Grunt Tankhead has a tough militaristic feel. It manages to achieve this aesthetic by balancing its heavy cannon-toting head and meaty body on top of substantial spread-toed feet.

Kaiserian Grunt Tankhead (Chubbs custom}

To fully appreciate this type of build, you need to get under the skin of the mechanical beast. Luckily, Kelvin has supplied us with a video showing off his ingenious construction techniques. In it, he records in detail how the various components of the mech’s armoured body are applied to its Technic skeleton.

Samurai mech: The ultimate upgrade

There are a handful of builders who consistently produce spectacular creations; Eero Okkonen is one of them. This time out he’s turned his attention to a reimagining of the classic 2012 Ninjago set 9448 Samurai Mech. It’s quite the upgrade! The official LEGO set is a little clunky and disproportioned, but in contrast Eero has designed a tough giant of a mech, which cleverly integrates the key aesthetic elements of the original, such as the gold stomach ring and katana blade. It’s however in the detailed building of the mech’s head, which utilises an array of black macaroni tubes and specialised elements to create its demonic features, that we see a master-builder lift his model out of the ordinary.

Samurai Mech

Cargo mech brings all the boys to the yard

This purple beast isn’t just your average cargo lifter. It’s a mean, lean, hefting machine. I mean, just look at that third arm! Markus Rollbühler, a frequently featured builder on The Brothers Brick, treats us again with his latest mech creation. The level of detail is, as usual. incredible. I really like the light on the mech’s left side and the vent features next to the cockpit. The mech’s carrying capacity is only possible, however, thanks to at least eight small ball and socket joints.

Mech Monday #20: Heavy Lifter

I’m sure this mech could definitely beat down anything from Alien.

The ultimate crossover anime movie of the century, if it ever happens

If the right copyright holders ever found a way to collaborate, any movie featuring this legendary trio would probably be an instant blockbuster hit. The Gundam RX-78-2, Voltron, and Optimus Prime all in a single scene saving the world is what Tom Vanhaelen teases us with. I found it quite delightful how Voltron was sized down tremendously from its official LEGO Ideas Voltron set using some of the printed parts and looks like a medium-sized model of its larger cousin.

RX-78-2 - Voltron - Optimus Prime

This punchy mech speaks with its fists

Builder Oscar Cederwall imagines a future where giant powerful mechs duke it out for your betting amusement. In this corner, weighing in at 30 tons, in blue armor we have the B-07 Melee Mech. Most mechs boast an impressive array of guns but I like how this one is instead equipped with out-sized fists. The stretcher holder part in yellow makes for good detailing and, when used in moderation, is an excellent color choice against the blue, black and white. Be sure to check out the rest of Oscar’s work as his other futuristic ideas also pack a powerful punch.

B-07 Melee Mech - RoboRumble 3000

Apocalypse build makes use of “shattered” bricks

“The End” clearly isn’t the end of fantastic LEGO creations in this post-apocalyptic build by SweStar. Using more than 50 round tiles as roadway, dozens of clear slopes and a random assortment of brick debris, SweStar is able to pull of the look of mankind’s dreary future. I found the use of slopes as broken windows to be very insightful and realistic. The red truck frame also stuck out due to it being one of the oldest LEGO accessories in this build, a literal relic from another time.

Brothers Brick

Time to destroy dolomite

I am not a miner, but I imagine that it is not quite as fun and exciting as the 1990s Rock Raiders LEGO theme made it look. Nevertheless, I have fond memories of this action-packed adventure theme. My nostalgia was somewhat dormant for a long time, until I had the privilege to write about a Rock Raiders tunneling drone here on the Brothers Brick. The creation made me feel so good that I felt compelled had to make my own Rock Raiders-themed model. And here it is; the “Dolomite Destroyer” (named in the honour of the iconic 4940 Granite Grinder LEGO set).

Dolomite Destroyer

I have experimented with proportions a bit for this model. Just a simple colour scheme would not cut it for a Rock Raiders build. It had to be bulky and rough. The whole thing started with a Throwbot/Slizer shoulder/hand piece as the mech’s arms and continued from there. The second central part was an Atlantis minifig helmet within the body. I finished the model off with a little crane because I think cranes look so cool and industrial. While this model was fun to build, I will be scrapping it to build another creation in this style later on.