Tag Archives: 1:1

The chirping of the birds, announcing spring

I am not sure whether Kai NRG lives in the southern hemisphere or not, but spring is starting for some people out there and this creation of a mother bird feeding its baby definitely captures the feelings of the season.

Bird's Nest

Kai says the bird is some sort of lark, but he could not get the colours of the feathers accurate enough. There are some interesting part usages in the baby bird, but even more so the elephant tail/trunk pieces used as the nest (a requirement for the ABS building contest, for which this creation was built). I have mixed feelings about the tree though. On one hand, the leaves are, understandably, not perfect and the textures may be a bit too intense. On the other hand though, the very idea of building a segment of a tree in 1:1 scale and the complex shaping and angles involved are very impressive.

Practice shooting targets with a working LEGO Desert Eagle

As a LEGO weapon builder myself, I know how difficult it is to construct a gun model that fires projectiles and manages to look the part. However, YouTuber Snyzer_Tech makes it look easy with his functional Desert Eagle replica. Though it looks a bit flashy in custom-painted gold, his magazine-fed, brick-shooting handgun is impressive in both form and function. Watch Snyzer light up some brick-built targets in this slick two-minute video.

Wearable LEGO Star Wars Jango Fett helmet

Lego Admiral continues his impressive series of wearable LEGO helmets with a build of bounty hunter Jango Fett’s helmet from Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones. The builder continues to refine his techniques since constructing his Darth Vader helmet replica, nailing the dome shape on top, the iconic T-shaped visor slot, and indented cheek plating. The fold-down rangefinder is a nice touch.

Wearable Lego Jango Fett Helmet

Lego Admiral shows the Mandalorian helmet is not only screen accurate in the bricks, but is also wearable.

Wearable Lego Jango Fett Helmet

Have a slice of this delicious cake because it’s somebody’s birthday somewhere!

The possibility of mimicking literally any material or texture with plastic LEGO bricks never ceases to amaze me. This extremely appetising chocolate cake by Kai NRG/Geneva features just a handful of curved slopes in reddish brown colour and is fairly simple, but the decorations are a little confectionery masterpiece. Elegantly shaped elephant tail/trunk pieces, which the sweet cream on top of the cake is made of, look almost edible.

Happy ABS Round 2.4!

Racing for the best lap times around the block

While today’s kids have rad smartphone-controlled quadrotors to play with, there’s something nostalgic about a simple, old school R/C car. Arran Hearn induces such nostalgia with a LEGO R/C racing buggy and radio transmitter pair. Bright colors, excellent proportions, a clever parts usage for the antenna, and just the right amount of detail in the body and shock absorbers makes Arran’s R/C buggy pop.

R/C Racing Buggy

The detail on the bulky radio transmitter is incredibly lifelike. A quick glance and one would think it could control the buggy above.

R/C Radio Transmitter

Get tactical with a LEGO Black Ops II M8A1

Recently, my favorite entry in the Call of Duty franchise — Black Ops II — was added to Xbox One backwards compatibility. I picked up Treyarch Studios’s 2012 vision of combat in 2025 again, and felt inspired to build my favorite rifle in the game: the M8A1, a rifle based on the real H&K XM8.

M8A1 - Call of Duty: Black Ops II

In addition to being inspired by the design of the gun itself, I was motivated to build by the color scheme. Most of the rifle in game is tan, but its carry handle has a subtle bronze color. I showed this color difference with two LEGO colors: tan, and medium dark flesh. The latter color is fairly limited in parts selection, which made its implementation a fun challenge.

M8A1 - Call of Duty: Black Ops II

Working features on the LEGO M8A1 include a moving trigger, removable curved magazine, and a sliding ambidextrous charging handle. The tactical rail on the carry handle can attach a LEGO reflex sight that projects a red aiming dot onto a window piece. I show and discuss these functions, as well as a few techniques used to achieve the detail on the weapon, in this four minute video.

See more photos of the M8A1 on my Flickr, or check out other LEGO Black Ops weapons we have featured, such as the PDW-57 SMG and KRM-262 shotgun.

Wearable LEGO Darth Vader helmet

The Force is strong with Lego Admiral and his life size, wearable LEGO Darth Vader helmet. The detailed features of the iconic face mask and breather are captured well with the bricks, as is the smooth paneled shaping of the dome.

Wearable Lego Darth Vader Helmet

Wearable Lego Darth Vader Helmet

See more photos of LEGO Admiral’s helmet on Flickr, and learn a technique for constructing your own LEGO helmet with a Halo ODST helmet breakdown.

Slay the Locust horde with a 5000-piece LEGO Gears of War 4 Lancer

You won’t need biceps the size of watermelons to look tough with this Lancer Assault Rifle from Gears of War 4 built by Alec Doede. His replica of the iconic gaming weapon is incredibly detailed, with accurately constructed sights, grips, and angled paneling. I can hear the aggressive sound of the chainsaw bayonet revving up just looking at it.

Custom Lancer

A menacing LEGO Technic 1:2 scale T-rex skull

A MOCpages user known simply as Dee:] has made this incredible 1:2 scale recreation of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull, made almost entirely of technic pieces – around 2000 of them. The creation uses many techniques to capture complex anatomical angles with surgical precision, and the thin technic panel pieces mimic the natural look of cranial bones. The only thing that is not 100% accurate (besides the unavoidable pin holes in the panels) is the number of teeth, which the real dinosaur had much more of. The build is approximately 55cm long and 33cm wide, which is a bit less than half the size of the 150cm long original. Or maybe it’s actually a life-sized baby T-rex skull!

Tyrannosaurus Rex Skull [1:2]

Capturing magic in a lantern

Some creations rely on complicated techniques and difficult shapes to impress the viewer, while others make the connection by emotion. The strength of Tinkerbell in a lantern waiting for Peter by Jae Won Lee lies in the expressive posing of Tinkerbell in the center. The lantern’s details reward closer inspection, like the golden decorations or the seams between 1x6x5 window panels to look like wire mesh.

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Quarter of a million brick LEGO McLaren 720S goes from zero to ABS in 2000 hours

Founded in the nineteen-sixties by Kiwi racecar designer, driver, engineer, inventor and all-around legend Bruce McLaren, the McLaren company is one of the most successful in Formula One championship history, winning a total of 8 constructors’ world championships and 12 drivers’ world championships. This year, McLaren released their latest car in the Super Series lineup, the gorgeous 720S, and this incredible LEGO replica is the centerpiece of McLaren’s stand at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Built by the team at Bright Bricks, the model comprises a staggering 280,000 bricks and took a team of six builders over 2000 hours.
McLaren 720S by Bright Bricks

The real car is powered by a 4.0 twin turbo V8 and can go from 0-60 mph in a mere 2.8 seconds and up to 124 mph in 7.8 seconds, with a top speed of 212 mph! However, the 1:1 scale model arrived at the Goodwood stand a bit more slowly, as festival visitors will help complete the model. They will need to place orange McLaren bricks in designated parts of the car, with the 720S reaching completion at the end of the Festival of Speed.

McLaren 720S by Bright Bricks

Duncan Titmarsh, the UK’s only LEGO Certified Professional and part of Bright Bricks, led the 720S build. The LEGO version weighs approximately 200kg more than the actual 720S, coming in at around 1.6 tonnes (1.8 US tons). The build features real wheels and a steel base but is otherwise almost entirely made of LEGO, including the brake pads, windscreen wipers, and windscreen. Some additional details like the badge and license plate have been provided by McLaren to finish the build nicely.McLaren 720S by Bright Bricks

The LEGO 720s will go on tour to other marketing events once it has been finished, so you may get a chance to see it in person.

Statistical data says the Internet is 50% cats

And yet the LEGO side of the Internet seems to have a lower percentage of cats than average – not surprisingly, as the characteristic cat’s head and legs offer a significant challenge for builders and can be done wrong very quickly. The latest builder to pick up the challenge is that Russian jack-o- all-trades Timofey Tkachev.

cat 1

This time Timofey tries a technique of staggered layered plates to achieve complicated natural curves, which has been used to create LEGO cats before, but what appears to be different here is the intensely detailed face, and that the cat seems to be partially poseable. The playful pose adds a lot to the presentation, as do the LEGO basket and ball (which is an official piece, by the way).