Tag Archives: Diorama

There’s nothing like a massive LEGO diorama to prove that you’ve arrived as a LEGO builder. The LEGO dioramas we feature here span everything from realistic medieval castles to scenes from World War II, and more than a few post-apocalyptic wastelands.

I want to discover the secret path a bird delivered into my heart

We’ve recently featured a sci-fi diorama sporting some nice portals, but this diorama by I Scream Clone places portals in a very different theme indeed. Both of these were built for a loosely connected collaborative project named “Portals” presented during the Sydney Brick Show. The builder brings an oldschool castle diorama to the table, with some very good structures, but mostly simple landscaping that helps the portals stand out even better. I wonder, are these dioramas really connected…

Wanderlust

Labour of love pit stop for hot rods recreated from real life

Once in a while you see a build that not only looks great, but simply blows it out of the water, combining great details and huge playability potential. This build by Andrea Lattanzio of a famous hot rod workshop is surely one of them. What brings this place to life are the small details scattered around, such as the electrical poles and the junkyard at the side.

MOONEYES headquarters - Santa Fe Springs CA | exterior

Andrea tells us a little history of the Mooneyes Headquarters, where gearheads and hot rod modders hang out to get their repairs and mods. Today, Mooneyes is still located in Santa Fe Springs, California, where it’s been since 1962. The builder is obviously a huge fan, and has painstakingly recreated the full workshop layout inside.

MOONEYES headquarters - Santa Fe Springs CA | interior

Click to see more of the Mooneyes shop

Neo-Tokyo menaced by spindly mechanoid

It’s nice to see a LEGO mech placed into some sort of context, and F@bz knocks it right out of the park with this diorama of an unusual mech making a nuisance of itself on a busy city street. The cars and commuter train give an idea of the scale of the fearsome machine, and while the rest of the backdrop is very plain, it creates a real focus on the mechanical star of the show.

Mammothkoma (04)

The mech design is wonderfully weird — spindly legs, a relatively smooth carapace stuffed with greebly detailing, and that vast sail panel sticking up from the machine’s rear. I love when LEGO builders let their imaginations run riot in genres that generally have established “rules”. This model breaks just about all the norms — and does it with real style.

Mammothkoma (01)

Mining with spaceships and portals

Everybody likes a good Classic Space model, and this crystal mining diorama by Brick Knight has all the right details. From the characteristic grey-blue colour scheme with yellow and black stripes, to antennas and recreations of vintage sets, all placed on a tan landscape, just like the box arts of the 1980s. The cracks filled with green minerals break up the landscape very well, but the main focus is obviously in the sci-fi elements like space stations, spaceships and most notably the round portals. The builder explains the diorama as an uninhabited planet where the Classic Space explorers discovered a new energy source and are mining it for its engineering uses.

Tregatis VI Mining Operation-1

Click to see more of this space outpost

Keep your Mini running like new with this well-oiled shop

This fantastic service shop by _BrickBro_¬†will tune your official 10242 Mini Cooper to tip-top shape, with just a quick engine and transmission replacement. It’s got all the necessary tools and accessories to spruce up that evergreen hatchback, from replacement hubs to new steering wheels.

MCM_2

Based on the popular youtube series Mighty Car Mods, the shop features hosts Marty and Moog walking viewers through their top-to-bottom restoration of this cult classic car.

MCM_1

Click to see more of the shop

Light-hearted brick Jesus reminds us of the real meaning of Easter

There’s always a question of taste when it comes to the depiction of religious or political themes in any artistic medium, and LEGO bricks are no exception. However, I hope it’s impossible for anyone to take offence at Lasse Vesterg√•rd‘s brick-built interpretation of Jesus’ return from the grave.

LEGO Easter

This is a great little model, depicting victory over misery and death and carrying an appropriate sense of joy — something you can surely enjoy regardless of your particular choice of belief (or unbelief) system. The thumbs-up and the cheeky inclusion of wounds in Jesus’ palms add a touch of black comedy, but the visual contrast between the grim grey backdrop and the bright flowers carries a more serious message of hope and an eventual release from suffering.

Begun, the LEGO Clone War has

KW_Vauban captured the Geonosian Petranaki Arena scene from Attack of the Clones rather well with LEGO bricks. The builder’s use of dark orange bricks on detailed and accurately constructed Geonosian architecture was a smart choice. In particular, I like the construction of the main gate with the CIS overlook above.

Geonosis - Petranaki Arena

Dozens of Geonosians line the arena, while Battle Droids and Jedi fight below.

Both gates 01

Click to see more of the Geonosian Arena

“Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back” – the final cut

You’re welcome to add your own joke about George Lucas meddling with the Original Trilogy as he cranked out the Prequel Trilogy, but I love Star Wars again so I’ll leave that to the unrepentant cynics. The last LEGO creation we featured by Kit Bricksto brought the wonderful planets of the Star Wars universe to the garden. The builder continues his strong streak with this utterly unique diorama featuring tiny scenes from The Empire Strikes Back on a brick-built film strip set against a larger Hoth hangar scene in a TV. The potted background ties this latest build to Kit’s previous build.

IDSMO - Final Cut

Nassau is full of pirates and intrigue

I confess, I have not watched Black Sails. I know, I’m sorry! I plan on fixing that. But I don’t need any context to appreciate this lovely diorama based on the show by Mpyromaxos, depicting a busy scene with arson, theft, and property damage – which I understand is all pretty normal for pirates. There’s a lot of great detail to take in, and some easter eggs too. How many characters do you recognize?

Free Vane and burn Nassau to the ground!!!

Designer interior with feature brick wall

There are so many lovely details in Heikki Mattila‘s latest LEGO interior. The exposed brick wall and the painting provide a smart and stylish backdrop, and the glass tables look very classy. However, closer attention is rewarded with some lovely touches — a golden spaceman visor as a designer bowl, Gollum/Frodo’s precious ring adding lustre to the lamp, and Technic half-pins for the little round legs of the IKEA-style sofa. The best detail of all is perhaps a little lost, slightly washed-out in this image — don’t miss the use of grille bricks, partially inset into the floor, to create the effect of the white rug at the room’s centre.

Brown Living Room

Here are some more examples of stylish modern LEGO interiors by this Finnish builder that we have featured previously here on The Brothers Brick:

Living the high life
Join the famous 800 feet club
Come warm yourself by the LEGO fire
Modern spaces for modern living
Chill out in this beautfully serene LEGO spa

A well-built stick hut as sturdy as stone

It’s a bit strange when a LEGO creation is sturdier than the subject it represents. Such is the case with this weathered hut by Grant Davis, which looks like a bunch of bricks were thrown together without proper connections and then collapsed immediately after being photographed.

A Weathered Lodging

That is most definetely not the case, as Grant shows in his very informative video, where he even turns the build upside-down — and it remains intact! The ground texture and colours should also be pointed out, as the builder achieves a very realistic effect by using closely related colours in natural looking patterns.

When the zombies come, a damp cellar is like a palace

While not luxurious, it is definetely the desire of any apocalypse survivor to find somewhere like this cellar to hunker down. This particular “palace” by Gareth Gidman was built for the Brrraaaaaaaiiiiinnnssss!!! contest on Eurobricks. The cellar section looks very lived-in, with weapons and sustenance positioned so it looks filled, but not cluttered. I should point out the use of broken tiles; while not purist, it is good that the builder found a way to still use his ruined pieces. On the ground level we see some well-built decay with a broken window, overgrowth, and cracks in the walls. Some nice minifig action makes for a well-rounded scene.

The Hideout

(As a side note, I have seen brown pieces break much more often than other colours, and seeing Gareth’s broken brown tiles, I am more convinced that this is statistically relevant.)