Tag Archives: Diorama

There’s nothing like a massive LEGO diorama to prove that you’ve arrived as a LEGO builder. The LEGO dioramas we feature here span everything from realistic medieval castles to scenes from World War II, and more than a few post-apocalyptic wastelands.

Classic Space Outpost

Let’s take a walking tour of this gorgeous spaceport, built by Stephan Niehoff. Stephan estimates it took 6 months to build. In terms of parts, he stopped counting after 9,000. Hats off to you, Stephan, because I’m quite sure I would have stopped counting parts at 10.

On to our tour.

ClassicSpaceOutpost

You’re going to have to sit down with this and just oogle the gorgeous details, but let’s cover a few of them to get you started:

The Craters: The building style gives some great angles and very smooth lines for the entire display.

Communication Tower: With the dish set to receive signals, the tower is sturdy, industrial, and excellent situated with everything anyone could need.

Landing Pad: I absolutely love the textures from using the up-side-down plates here. It’s a great way to seperate it from the smooth lines of the studs-not-on-top design of the rest of the diorama.

I am particularly delighted by the rocket and launch tower, with all of the access points and the rocket itself.

So! What’s your favorite detail from the Outpost?

A true Legoland Theme Park: 100% LEGO

Pro building team Olive Seon are back it with another magnificent brick-built beauty; this time a theme park. The awesome high-flying roller coaster really ties the model together, and also gives you a sense of scale for just how small most LEGO dioramas really are. As per usual with these builders, there is a lot to look at and loads of fun little details to spy. My favorites are the LEGO Architecture line buildings used for a miniland within the park.


Open and shut… A case of LEGO Castle sweetness

I love the detail on this tower and the half-timber walls of the building. The sparse landscaping is very nice and the stairs leading up to the door are very well executed. But what makes this build really stand out is the fact that it opens!

Building a beautiful castle is much harder than it looks. Building an accessible and believable interior is also much harder than it looks. Doing both of these in the same the build and making it look like the castle doesn’t actually open is something that Isaac S. has mastered.

The Conquest of Lampsacus

The indomitable Mark Erickson has created yet another beautiful scene. I love the detailing on all of these buildings. Mark has done a great job of packing them with believable historical detail, making them all work together while still keeping each building unique. Not an easy job at all. My hat is off to you, sir!

The Conquest of Lampsacus

Tintin Explores the Moon

As a child, I loved the Tintin Explorers on the Moon, I must have checked it out from the library dozens of times. I’ve seen many fantastic attempts at building the rocket Tintin and friends take to the moon, but this latest by Tyler Clites (Legohaulic) is the first build of the lunar tank I’ve seen. Simply put, this is awesome, this scene captures the right atmosphere, from the lunar surface to the brick-built Snowy under one of the domes.

Tintin Moon Tank

Domestication, Contemplation, Relaxation

Flickr member simplybrickingit has created this intriguing triptych of household rooms. Each one is beautifully furnished but completely figure-less, and symbolizes a different aspect of our everyday lives. It’s all very Zen. I love the way the partial walls make these scenes feel somehow out of time.


 

And you thought your winter was rough.

It’s been a rough winter all around, though I am glad most of our snowy adventures do not involve storming a tall tower. Isaac S (soccersnyderi)’s little build is quite clever, and I do appreciate some of the techniques he used here. It definitely avoids being a boring tower, and I like the cold feel of the whole build.

Bravo!