About Caylin

A life-long LEGO fan, Caylin returned to the hobby as an adult in 2003, after her mother bought her a basic creator tub as a joke. Her mother regrets this. You'll probably find her online at Classic Castle, and occasionally FBTB. For real-world stuff, she maintains her membership with SEALUG, the Seattle LEGO Users Group -- though geographically speaking she's a fair bit closer to Orlando, Florida. She regularly attends BrickCon in Seattle, Washington.

Posts by Caylin

The Pulsar Requin: Blacktron’s Big Ship

This beauty right here hails from the frozen north. Gerard Joosten (Elephant Knight) has created this lovely Blacktron ship, and it’s a sight to behold. This thing is massive.

Taking over two months to construct, this ship is full of great details. You can stroll through his flickr stream to really get a good inside peak at the galley, the bridge, and other sweet details. I keep seeing something new every time I look at it.

Pulsar Requin 007

Pulsar Requin 015

I must go up to the skys again

Tall ships and steampunk make very good bedfellows, especially in the hands of Sean and Steph Mayo. Their latest build, the Iron Maiden, is just stunning. I didn’t quite grasp that it was LEGO when I ran across the thumbnail originally.

Iron Maiden

Should you be so interested, I also recommend checking out the build prior to this. I happen to not care for little flying death monsters myself, but I will acknowledge they are brilliantly done.

Chemistry Tools

When I first spotted this, I did not realize it was a render. I am a big fan of scientific builds, and this is definitely up my alley. I particularly love the molecule model. The scale is fantastic. The periodic table is instantly recognizable.

Matt Bace is definitely knocking out some amazing things, like the power strip we featured last week. I definitely recommend poking around a bit in his flickr steam.

Chemistry Teacher's Desk

Some days, all you need is a swing.

Sometimes the best things are the simple pleasures. Swinging on a swing set is definitely one of those. You get to feel the wind in your hair, and work up the courage to leap off when the swing reaches the perfect height.

Alexander Safarik’s (Malydilnar) brick-built version is ready for anyone who’s willing to come and swing for a while!

Swing

Classic cars that should have been

I must be on a car kick today.

These classic little cars are just adorable, well designed, and have so much character. Chris Elliot‘s got quite a few of them in his photostream; I couldn’t pick just one.

So, dear reader, chime in, in the comments: which one is your favorite?

1899 Kastner Stadtauto
1899 Kastner Stadtauto

1958 Bruegger-Radnor Centaur Taxi
1958 Bruegger-Radnor Centaur Taxi

1992 Ace Roadster Concept
1992 Ace Roadster Concept

70814 Emmet’s Construct-o-Mech [Review]

I had an opportunity to review LEGO Movie 70814 Emmet’s Construct-o-Mech Building Set, provided for us by LEGO. The set runs $59.99 USD, with 708 pieces.

Overall? I like the set. I think it’s got an excellent selection of parts overall. I enjoyed the build thoroughly. There are some excellent details to the model overall that make it appear particularly impressive. It looks really nifty. Also? Angry!Unikitty.

After having built it, though? I can’t say I’d pay full price for it.

Let’s explore more, shall we?

Continue reading

These are probably the worst pies in London.

There’s no denying that Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street is a dark, dark musical and it covers dark, dark material as only Stephen Sondheim can do.

James Pegrum (peggyjdb), who is no stranger to TBB, has done a lovely rendition of Mrs. Lovett’s meat pie shop. The build is inspired by Tim Burton’s 2007 film.

Meat pie anyone?

No cats were harmed in the writing of this post. They were only mildly annoyed.

LEGO, Quantum Mechanics, and Defining the Kilogram

As Adult Fans of LEGO, we know that our hobby with LEGO bricks has some amazing applications, and we see how the creativity flourishes. I think it’s amazing when LEGO finds some very practical uses in real-world places that help not just creativity, but further science and innovation.

Five researchers at the U.S. National Institute of Standards (NIST) have used LEGO to create a LEGO Watt Balance. The Watt balances at NIST as well as other facilities are being used to help push the “measurement precision to within a few parts per hundred million,” which will hopefully achieve a redefined kilogram by 2018. This is important because as of right now, the kilogram is the only fundamental unit of the International System of Units that’s defined by a physical object, not a universal constant.

Leon S. Chao, Stephan Schlamminger, DB. Newell, J.R. Pratt and Xiang Zhang have recently submitted their paper on their LEGO Watt Balance to the American Journal of Physics. Their creation is helping bring quantum mechanics into the classroom, and will hopefully inspire a new generation.