About Caylin

A life-long LEGO fan, Caylin returned to the hobby as an adult in 2003, after her mother bought her a basic creator tub as a joke. Her mother regrets this. She regularly attends BrickCon in Seattle, Washington, where she goes by the title of Prize Goddess. You can check out her flickr account here.

Posts by Caylin

Adam Savage’s One Day Build of Jason Allemann’s Sysiphus Kinetic Sculpture [Video]

We here at The Brothers Brick are long-standing fans of Jason Allemann and his beautiful works. Previously, we’ve featured many of his builds: his Mosaic Printer, robotic Cookie Decorator, and, of course, his beautiful Labyrinth ball maze, released as a LEGO Ideas set this year.

Adam Savage

One of my favorites, though, is his kinetic sculpture of Sisyphus and his eternal struggle pushing the boulder. Turns out we aren’t the only big fans of this work of art. Adam Savage of Mythbusters and Tested fame saw a video of Jason’s sculpture, and contacted Jason, getting custom instructions and the parts necessary to duplicate the build.

In the video below, watch Adam Savage and Norman Chan build the sculpture, experiencing all the highs and lows and joys of building a large creation (including not being able to find that ONE part!)

Coat of Arms in LEGO

In a Coat of Arms, everything has meaning: the symbols, colors and placement all tell a story about the family it’s representing. Robert4168 tells us the tale of the fictional Dratiphe Coat of Arms. He tells us the Gauntlet stands for strong and prepared, and the Scales for justice. The Anvil stands for honor, and the Arrows mean readiness for war.

I love the sculpting and scale on all of the items on the coat of arms, and the scroll work is just lovely. It says, “Omnia Praesignis Est” and adds another level of complexity to the build.

Uridius Dratiphe's Coat of Arms

Santa Maria del Fiore in microscale

Once, when I was in Italy, I had a chance to visit one of the cathedrals — and was rendered speechless. The massive scale and timeless beauty of these historic works of art is awesome. Each cathedral has its own history and architectural details, and the Santa Maria del Fiore (or Il Duomo, if you prefer) in Florence is a stunning example.

While the original took centuries to complete, Legorevival Lrevival‘s version is small, compact, and considerably easier to construct. He’s given this beautiful landmark the LEGO Architecture treatment, and it’s totally one I’d love to buy someday. It’s instantly recognizable.

LEGO Architecture concept of Santa Maria del Fiore

Tiny brick-built brownstone neighborhood welcomes you home

Looking for a new place? Barton Thinks has the perfect neighborhood for you. These microscale brownstone homes are just adorable. The build is full of great detail, which can be tricky when you’re working in microscale. The easily recognizable brownstone architecture caught my eye, but check out that wonderful stoplight!

I love the roof and bay windows the building has, all packed into a small footprint. Each home sits on just 3 by 6 studs, making the whole module just 16 by 16 studs.

Brownstones - New Littlebrick

13 Miller’s Court in tragic detail

The late summer and fall of 1888 was a rough time for women in the Whitechapel district in London. The ever evasive Jack the Ripper slowly but surely made his way into history and headlines, culminating in what is believed to be the last attack on Mary Kelly, who was discovered the morning of November 9, 1888.

Mark Hodgson has illustrated the room she rented with stunning detail of how it looked prior to the first week of November that year.

Mary Kelly at Miller's Court, in Lego

The alley way, building front, and room are full of detail of the cramped quarters where she lived. Her life, up until her tragic death, is illustrated in one tiny room. Her murderer was never found, and the legends surrounding Jack the Ripper endure to this day.

Mary Kelly's lodging room, interior... in LegoMary Kelly's room, number 13, Miller's Court... in LegoMary Kelly's lodging room, interior... in Lego

Visit Copenhagen – in microscale

It can take years to save up for a vacation abroad, or sometimes a vacation at home. Ulrik Hansen has taken the time for you and created a beautiful microscale rendition of Copenhagen, Denmark, for us all to enjoy. While it’s taken us a bit to find this to show you, it’s well worth your time to pore over the amazing detail packed into this city snapshot. The level of detail is just exquisite.

I invite you to explore his Flickr gallery to learn more about sites to see in Copenhagen, and there are plenty of detailed shots for you to enjoy.

Gatehouse to wherever you’d like to go

I do very much enjoy castle walls with character, and this gatehouse by David Zambito fits the bill. The wall is textured, and the landscaping has a great organic look to it. It gives a nice sense of time: this wall has been here a long time and seen things, and so many stories have passed through it.

Gatehouse

David has some nice examples of landscaping (check out this cobblestone road!) in his flickr gallery, and I invite you to take a peek!

In defense of Reedus

Building in microscale is difficult and I have full respect for those that can pull it off well. This little gate by Halhi141 captured the scale and subject quite well. I like the flats and details for the castle wall. That can be difficult enough on larger models, let alone models of this size. The trees and pathway are wonderful.

The Defense of Reedus

Face to face with the Minotaur

It’s generally considered poor taste to keep a god’s gift for yourself, as Minos found out. In the event you find yourself step-parent to a half-man, half-beast like the Minotaur, please be sure to keep your local architect on call to build an emergency labyrinth, if necessary.

W. Navarre gives us this glorious bust of the Minotaur. I like the sculpting and the aggressive horns. The face shows the proper amount of anger at its imprisonment in the labyrinth.

Minotaur

Ridin’ in style from hospital to grave

Today’s post is best enjoyed with a little bit of music. I’m sure builders Lino and Tim will appreciate the musical selection.

Lino and Tim have teamed up to bring us a pair of stylin’ rides that all of us hope to never be in. If you’re going to be in an ambulance or a hearse, wouldn’t you like them to be as awesome as these two?

Lino’s contribution is the 1931 Ford Delivery Ambulance, affectionately called the Flatline Ford. I have full confidence that traffic will move over when they see this bad boy coming after them.

'31 Flatline Ford

From Tim, we have our 1967 Cadillac Hearse. I think “Hell’s Bells” is awfully appropriate for this beast. This hearse will deliver the goods regardless of how far or hard to reach the final resting place might be. I absolutely love the hood ornament!

"Hell's Bells" 1967 Cadillac Hearse

Al’s Space Diner

The Fifth Element sits squarely in my top five sci-fi films of all time. I absolutely love the characters and world that’s been created. Priovit70 has crafted this fabulous fly-in retro hot-dog stand that looks like Corbin Dallas may have swung by on more than one occasion, depending on how many points were on his license that day. I like to believe he took Leeloo there and she was less than impressed.

It’s colorful, it’s got character, and there’s a great story going on with this place.

Al's space diner - photo

“We’re going on an adventure!”

Regardless of your opinion of the most recent movie adaptation, The Hobbit is a timeless adventure story that has stood the test of time. The idea of gaining the courage to leave home and embark on a grand adventure is the very idea that makes the world go round. It’s the idea that inspires adventure, inspires discovery, and creates stories for the next generation.

Noel Peterson has illustrated that moment of courage, of letting go, of leaving as Bilbo races across the bridge toward his destiny. The bridge has the perfect, aged, well-worn look, with life going on as two hobbits fish in the murky water. I like the story this build tells.

Going on an Adventure