About Iain

Iain Heath is an avid builder specializing in the "Bricks of Character" style, which he helped define. He has been using LEGO to parody popular culture since 2007, when he created the now infamous Stephen Hawking model. He is a SeaLUG member and regular theme coordinator at BrickCon. For five years he also ran a blog called The Living Brick, that showcased the best character-based LEGO creations from around the world. You can find his irreverent body of work on Flickr.

Posts by Iain

Party on, Victorian dudes

Serbian builder Milan Sekiz created this fearsome trio of steampunk hardware entitled Steam Party. Individually each piece stands out on its own. But with the addition of some greenery, wreckage and tire tracks, the whole ensemble is definitely greater that the sum of its parts.

I particularly love the tank (aka “Mr. Rust and two smoking barrels”) with it’s earthy color scheme, brick-heavy studs-hidden design, aggressive details, and of course those tracks! Check out Milan’s Flickr stream for lots of hero shots and closeups…

 

Vintage delivery truck

Flickr member bigboy99899 created this fully playable vintage delivery truck, complete with functional steering, optional roof, and cargo of beer barrels and other assorted booze. So suffice so say it’s a pre-prohibition era design!

As well as using an earthy color scheme to give the model that vintage feel, I also like that the builder did not constrain themselves to a specific scale (such as mining or miniland), allowing them to capture all of the details and angles that collectively make this such a fine looking vehicle.

Catch you on the flip-side

If conversations about audio equipment have you fondly remembering terms like “45 rpm”, “B-side”, “mix tape” or “VHF” then you’re probably ancient like me. Or you just rented Guardians of the Galaxy. Either way, this LEGO trifecta of vintage gear is far out, right on, and out of sight… Can you dig it?

First up is this 70s kitchen scene from Swedish retro-fanatic LegoJalex, featuring a portable radio and a color palette that practically defined the home d├ęcor of that decade. Looks like something right out of the 1973 IKEA catalog (and strangely, the 2010 catalog). It’s groovy, man.
  
Next, are these super-accurate recreations of turntable / cassette player units from the same era, created by Indonesian builder Yul Burman Karel. I swear, the one on the left looks like the exact one I used as a kid. Ok, time to boogie!

“Oh, oh, my Christmas tree’s delicious”

Procrastination. It’s a crippling disease that afflicts millions every year, especially around December. Don’t become a victim – shop now! And if you’re looking for the perfect gift for the LEGO fan that has everything, Chris McVeigh can help you out with this beautiful range of tree ornament kits. Or if you’re a total cheapskate like me, just print them off a set of building instructions. Bah, humbug!

I particularly like the inclusion of the arcade machine ornaments. Also, it looks like the roller ornaments could be easily converted into dreidels. Or with the application of a rubber mallet, possibly even a mkeka.

 
 

The cubicle of the future

If you’re gonna operate heavy machinery all day, you might as well be comfortable. And the operator of this Walker Mech by Flickr member nobu_tary has clearly gone to great lengths to trick out his mobile workplace, by adding a sporty bucket seat and a ton of other gear and personal effects, giving this build a great “lived in” feel.

Check out all the angles on this sweet mech to see how many more details you can spot. With all that equipment, it kinda reminds me of that old board game Buckaroo!

We’re gonna need a bigger broom

Building a transparent model is always a challenge, due to the more limited range of parts. But Flickr member Igginz has overcome that brilliantly by combining transparent and opaque parts in just the right way to create this terrifying Glass Spider. I don’t know what exactly is brewing inside that arachnid abdomen, but I want no part of it!

Check out his Flickr stream for lots of closeup shots.

“We jumped out of a window!”

What do you get if you combine the Pillsbury dough boy with the Michelin man and the Stay Puft marshmallow man? You probably get BayMax, the robotic sidekick from Disney’s new animated adventure Big Hero 6 (very loosely based on a Marvel comic of the same name). Oregonian builder Cole Edmonson wasted no time in creating a LEGO version of our inflatable friend with his mortal enemy, a soccer ball.

In space no-one can hear you rust

One of the more notable Maschin Krieger inspired builds from this year’s Ma.Ktober fest is probably the Baumeister Spinnentier, a “construction arachnid” style zero-G hardsuit, created by Canadian builder Josh Derksen.

Clearly the break-out technique Josh has used here is the application of paint to give the model a rusted look (…yes it rains in space, deal with it!). Using paint to artificially ‘weather’ LEGO is something I’ve wanted to do myself for a long time, but have not yet been man enough to attempt. But Josh totally nails it with this creation. Check out his full breakdown to get a look at all of its finer details and play features (which include poseable arms and pincers, and an openable cockpit).

Steampunk LEGO by Guy Himber [Review]

As holiday season approachs, No Starch Press is kicking into high gear with a slew of new titles for LEGO fans. Their latest offering is Steampunk LEGO by well-known LEGO builder, innovator and steampunk enthusiast Guy Himber. This 200 page compilation features the work of over 90 individual builders, and includes just about every notable LEGO steampunk creation of the past five years.

Physically, the book has a definite steampunk feel about it. Its blue and gold hard cover sports a full-color dust jacket (shown here) and all the pages have a high quality satin finish that enhances the sumptuous graphic design. The material is presented in the form an ornate Victorian scrapbook, complete with notelets and other trinkets mounted atop a variety of textured vintage backgrounds.

A cornucopia of building styles are covered here. And while the majority are mini-fig oriented, microscale and life-size builds are reasonably well represented. Entries are 1 or 2 to a page, and organized into logical chapters focusing on different categories such as trains, vehicles, automatons, weapons, sea vessels, airships and even floating rocks. There is also a pleasant ‘interlude’ in the center, showcasing Guy’s memorable Cabinet of Curiosities collaborative project.

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Colonel Mustard in the study with the candlestick

Ian Spacek seems to be on a roll in the ongoing 2014 MOCOlympics contest. In a round focused on board games, he chose to recreate Clue, a classic family game that has been around since the 40’s.

I love the way Ian has captured all the woody tones of the original board, as well as packing the build with many beautiful details such as the floor patterns, furniture and props. Check out MOCPages for loads of close-up photos and a chance to compare Ian’s interpretation with the original.