About Iain

Iain Heath is an avid builder specializing in the "Bricks of Character" style, which he helped define. He has been using LEGO to parody popular culture since 2007, when he created the now infamous Stephen Hawking model. He is a SeaLUG member and regular theme coordinator at BrickCon. For five years he also ran a blog called The Living Brick, that showcased the best character-based LEGO creations from around the world. You can find his irreverent body of work on Flickr.

Posts by Iain

Thriller, Killer

TBB regular Letranger Absurde continues to refine his unique style and churn out one great character build after another. This week he graced us with not one, but two, new examples: the erstwhile King of Pop, and a lady assassin who seems to be taking her work a bit too seriously. Both feature stellar poses, great proportioning, and a delightful use of Mixel eyes. It’s almost enough to make this aged character builder wanna hang up his bricks! I tip my hat to you, sir…

 

TBB cover photo: February 2016

We’re very enthusiastic about all things robotic here at The Mechas Mech Brothers Brick, so a mecha-themed monthly cover photo was inevitable. While a lot of the LEGO mech tech that we cover here is on the large side, this month’s moody mecha TBB cover photo by Italian builder Devid VII proves that sometimes it’s not always size that counts!

Want to see your own LEGO creation featured across TBB social media for a month? Then acquaint yourself with the submission guidelines and submit your *LANDSCAPE ORIENTED* photo today.

Keep up with the Brothers Brick by liking us on Facebook and following us on Twitter or Pinterest. And for occasional extra goodies, follow us on Flickr or subscribe to us on YouTube.

Taiwanese LEGO fan uses 15000 bricks to build 4½ foot long SHIELD Helicarrier

The most anticipated LEGO set of 2015 was the enormous Avengers SHIELD Helicarrier. As we highlighted in our extensive video review, there was a lot to like about that set, except for the relative scales of the carrier, the microfigs, and the quinjets. And while some builders have explored more ambitious LEGO Helicarrier designs within the confines of a computer screen, no-one has dared tackle the challenge of building a more properly scaled and movie-accurate version of the Avengers’ flying fortress using actual LEGO bricks …until now!

Working with nothing more than reference photos from the 2012 Avengers movie, Taiwanese builder ZiO Chao and a his friends Dada, Kimura, Kuan-Wei, Stephanie, Tiger and Will from the Formosa LEGO club spent a month and a half (and many sleepless nights) constructing this enormous and fully detailed model of the iconic Helicarrier. At 140cm x 80cm it’s twice the size of the official LEGO set, and contains five times as many pieces. At last, those “swooshable” little quinjets now actually have room to move around!

Regarding the build process, which he photographed in great detail, ZiO told The Brothers Brick: “Before I started to build it, the most annoying thing was collecting parts and classifying them. Then we used Technic beams to sketch out the skeleton of the carrier, which needed to be strong enough to hold everything together. Technic beams were also a great solution for the supporting yellow columns, the front of the carrier, and the four turbine engines.”

Click here to keep reading

Being disintegrated makes me very angry, very angry indeed!

Over the years we’ve featured many LEGO versions of Looney Tunes characters such as Bugs Bunny, Yosemite Sam and Marvin the Martian. But this is the first time we’ve seen Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century in brick form. Thanks to the talents of Tyler Clites we see him pictured here during his first screen appearance in 1953, battling for control of “Planet X” against Marvin:

Issue 16 of Blocks Magazine now available [News]

Valentine’s Day is on the horizon, and what better way to declare your love than with LEGO? From hearts to brick bouquets, this month’s issue of Blocks Magazine is packed with outside-the-box ideas to make this year’s celebration a little more special. Meanwhile in the ‘Build It’ section learn how to construct your own transforming Optimus Prime, with step-by-step instructions and a guide to sourcing all the necessary parts.

Also in this issue, Daniel Konstanski takes us through the history of “ramp and pit” baseplates, Simon Pickard investigates how LEGO can save a national heritage site from ruin, and there’s an exclusive interview with Matt De Lanoy, the man behind one of LEGO Ideas’ fastest-growing projects: Johnny Five.

For whom the bell trolls

Despite how well this creation by Takamichi Irie captures the essence of the ubiquitous and inexplicably enduring troll dolls, you might be inclined to dismiss it as just another nostalgia build. But hold onto your hats because, in a comeback that will probably put the Smurfs to shame, toshe loveably ugly “Gonks” are returning in 2016 with their very own animated movie! So get ready to see a lot, lot more of these frizzy haired critters on shelves later this year.

(Of course, we are secretly hoping this image will become the standard now when referring to “trolls” in the online LEGO community)

You are filled with determination (and spaghetti)

First it was Angry Birds, then Minecraft, then Five Nights at Freddy’s. Now the latest fad videogame phenomenon (if my teen’s current free time and fashion choices are any indication) appears to be the retro roleplaying runaway hit UNDERTALE. Such is the charm of this game, that even this old fart found himself playing …until I realized it had taken me a week to get just 5% of the way through!

Not surprisingly, LEGO versions of the game’s characters have started to appear online. I’ve picked out my favorites in the gallery below, and even created a LEGO Undertale Flickr group so we can all keep up with what I hope is gonna be a popular new building theme in 2016.

Flowey and Papyrus by Dylan Mievis
 

Click here to see the full gallery

Steven Universe in brick form is a gem of a LEGO creation

Spawned from the loins of mold-breaking show Adventure Time, and apparently destined for a similar kind of cult following, Steven Universe is a critically acclaimed American animation about a boy and his troop of supernatural friends, the Crystal Gems. It’s on frequently in my house, although I’ll admit I haven’t been bitten by the bug yet. But Danish builder Ilia must have, judging by his superb sculpture of the show’s titular character:

Talent is an accident of genes, and a responsibility

…not the catchphrase of Dr. Lazarus, Hans Gruber, the Sheriff of Nottingham or Severus Snape, but words spoken by the singular actor with the nasal tone and sardonic expression who portrayed all of them over the course of his stellar 25 year movie career. Beloved British actor Alan Rickman passed away today at the age of 69 (strangely mirroring the very recent passing of British music icon David Bowie). Hong Kong builder Alanboar Cheung whipped together this quick tribute to one of the more recent – and arguably most popular – of Rickman’s characters, the complicated Professor of Potions from the Harry Potter film series.

See the mice in their million hordes, from Ibiza to the Norfolk broads

Trying to summarize almost half a century of accomplishments and innovation in a couple of paragraphs would be futile, so I won’t even try. Yesterday a singular artist departed this particular plane of existence, leaving us with a body of work that will no doubt be remembered for another half century to come (including one final album, released just a few days ago).

Somehow we overlooked this gorgeous LEGO sculpture of Bowie’s Aladdin Sane album cover, built by Gabriel Thomson as an entry for the 2014 MOCAthalon contest. So let’s fix that now.

RIP David Bowie (aka Ziggy Stardust, aka Major Tom, aka The Goblin King) 1947-2016.