Yearly Archives: 2013

This hot rod is bigger than yours

It was inevitable, really. We’ve blogged hot rods and a full size LEGO car before and British LEGO-Technic enthusiast Simon Burfield built a working Lego vehicle large enough to carry a person a while ago (which we sadly neglected to blog at the time), but now there’s an actual full-size drivable LEGO hot rod, large enough to carry two people. This crazy contraption was built by Australian Steve Sammartino and Raul Oaida, from Romania.

About half a million bricks were used in the construction. The wheels aren’t made out of LEGO elements, obviously, and neither are a few of the other structural bits. The engine, however, is built with no fewer than 256 LEGO pneumatic pistons, which are powered by compressed air and can propel the car to a speed of about 20 km/h. According to Steve he is neither a car enthusiast nor a Lego enthusiast, which makes me wonder just how big things get if he is enthusiastic!

Via the BBC. Thanks to billyburg for the suggestion.

Ed Roth’s Rat Fink recreated in LEGO by Adam Grabowski

Adam Grabowski (misterzumbi) is usually quite laconic in his posting, so you can tell he’s excited about his latest LEGO work by the length of the accompanying prose. In short, he has recreated the famous Rat Fink by Ed Roth. And he’s done so with the help of some paint to make sure he got RF as close to source as he possibly could. Enjoy!

RatFink016a

Lego Friends Heartlake Juice Bar 41035 [Review]

41035 Heartlake Juice Bar is one of the 2014 Lego Friends sets. The set contains 277 pieces and retails for $29.99, which you can buy from Amazon.

Here is my summary of the highlights of the set, which are elaborated in the review video below.


Pros:


Cons:

  • Model seems small for the price you’re paying for

The main appeal of this set to me are the colors. As explained in the video, they are useful for the creation I’m working on. The two main reasons I can think of for buying this set would be for parts or for your kids to play with. In terms of parts, the ones I listed above are interesting and potentially useful, but Bricklink is the better source to get the specific ones you need without buying the entire set. The current price of $29.99 seems a bit high, but Amazon sometimes discount newly released sets by around 20% within the first few months.

Step right up! to the LEGOLand Circus

There’s something wonderfully old-fashioned about the latest model built by Nick Barrett (TechnicNick), the LEGOLand circus. Before there were minifigs, LEGO already made the much larger maxifigs (although nobody called them that at the time). Their upper torsos and heads were specialised parts, but their bodies were brick-built. I had a few of these as a child and my sister had a much larger collection. Nick, who is a few years older than me, has combined these classic figures with modern parts and top-notch build techniques in this fantastic model.

Legoland Circus

Apparently I’m not alone in liking this, because Nick’s model won the 6th annual MocOlympics contest. Check out the details (and what happens after the fuze on the cannon is lit) on MOCPages.

Microscale Holiday Train Diorama by TBRR

With a little help from TBB regular Tony Sava, Edward Chang from Texas Brick Railroad LUG has made this adorable microscale layout, complete with Christmas and holiday details, and replicas of children’s favourite trains. One for the kids and adults alike. And if you’re in the Friendswood, TX region you can see this in the brand store in Baybrook Mall.

TBRR_LUG_Showcase_2013-12_26

Lego photography tutorial by Legohaulic

Having good photos of your creation is almost as important as the build itself. Legohaulic takes us on a step by step tutorial from photographing a creation to putting in the final touches. If you want to learn tips to improve the presentation of your creations, this is a great reference. You can also check out previous tutorials by Nnenn and Fredo.

Lighting

Editing: Adjustment Layers

Editing: Background Removal

Tutorial: Background Removal (cont.)

Editing: Adding Effects