Tag Archives: Vehicle

LEGO planes, trains, and automobiles! Well, maybe not trains, since they don’t like to play with the other LEGO themes, but here you’ll find all our favorite cars, buses, boats, ships, helicopters, and anything else with an engine (and some without).

Functional Febrovery

Febrovery – the annual event where people build space rovers from LEGO. I (Mansur “Waffles” Soeleman) couldn’t say no to building a wheeled space vehicle this month. However, I decided to take a different approach: make it move, make it work, and make it Technical. The result is the Horizon Chariot – a massive, greebly shuttle transporter in a LEGO Classic Space livery. On the outside, it looks like a jumble of layers and pipes, but it’s merely a shell for a complex Technic frame with a working four-wheel drive with a double V8 piston engine, working steering, and soft pendular suspension. My favourite feature turned out to be a working tipping flatbed which launches the small LL-64 Arcade Hopper.

Febrovery - Horizon Chariot and LL-64 Arcade Hopper

The spaceship belonging to the Horizon Chariot was more of a distraction than an afterthought. I wanted to incorporate a NinjaGo arcade pod into the build as the blue airtight section of Classic Space vehicles. I found it was too small for a big vehicle so why not make a smaller vehicle as part of it? That’s how the aptly named LL-64 Arcade Hopper was born. I just couldn’t stop myself from building a spaceship! With swing-down wings and a smooth underside, it’s really a step away from my usually greebly builds, but it turned out to be a beautiful two-seater shuttle.

Check out the Flickr album to see more photos of the rover and the spaceship!

That’s a big cat, in small form

Building great-looking LEGO cars at minifigure scale is always a challenge, but it’s made at least a little easier by choosing a vehicle with fairly straight lines. Of course, that doesn’t mean that builder Jonathan Elliott has been slacking off with this 1968 Mercury Cougar, as there are tons of great details here. One of the best is the side mirrors, made with grey lever bases stuck onto 1×2 panels. Plus we can’t overlook the fact that Jonathan attempted the whole thing in teal, which, while it’s seeing a recent resurgance in official sets, is still a very limiting color.

1968 Mercury Cougar

Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays this courier

OK, so I know that title is the motto for the USPS, and I suspect this mail truck is meant to be from another service, but I can’t help but be reminded of the ceaseless work that mail carriers do wherever they are. This beautiful LEGO truck by Łukasz Libuszewski is just about perfect, from the little door handle made with a roller skate, to the brick-built MAIL lettering on the side. The color scheme of black, brown, and dark orange really sums it out for me, though, and gives the postal truck a vintage look beyond its stylings.

Mail Truck

The choice of the Me Generation

The ’70s were known for plunging necklines and one hell of a fuel crisis. At least one of those things was responsible for making the two best-selling cars in America the Ford Pinto and Plymouth Valiant. However, the Lamborghini Countach snubbed its rather pointed nose at all that and looked and performed like nothing else on Earth at the time. A builder by the name of RGB900 has given the favorite car of 80’s teenagers and strip club owners the LEGO treatment. At only six studs wide this is a truly impressive model. It just goes to show you don’t need a pinky ring and a lifetime membership at Spearmint Rhino to enjoy this ride. With LEGO and skill, you can build this pivotal sportscar on a box wine budget.

6 wide brick MOC Lamborghini Countach

The little roadster that could

Anyone even remotely familiar with hot rodding knows that the quintessential dream project is the ’32 Ford roadster. They’re always a favorite at car shows and Ian Ying pretty much reached hot rodding nirvana with this LEGO version. I can assure you, they didn’t look like this off the assembly line but with a bit of imagination and elbow grease, customizers back in the day would turn their Grandpa’s jalopies into these hot little roadsters. The classic black with red trim, whitewalls and flames is the pinnacle of perfection. Copious chrome and gold doesn’t hurt matters, either. Ian is proving to be an automotive LEGO-building legend with a penchant for shiny bling. Click in the blue link there to see what I mean.

32FordRoadster4

LEGO Creator Expert 10295 Porsche 911 Turbo & 911 Targa: German engineering meets Danish [Review]

As with LEGO’s Modular Buildings Collection, it’s become a yearly tradition for LEGO to add a new large-scale vehicle to the Creator Expert theme. The vehicles have ranged across a variety of car market segments, but one thing they all have in common is that they’re extremely iconic. And so it’s no surprise that this year’s entry is one of the most iconic sports cars of all time, instantly recognizable no matter your level of car knowledge. 10295 Porsche 911 Turbo & 911 Targa was revealed just two weeks ago and brings us not one but two versions of the classic sports car. With 1,458 pieces, it contains the parts to build either the performance Turbo version or the suave Targa with removable top. It will retail for US $149.99 | CAN $199.99 | UK £119.99 and will be first available to LEGO VIP members starting Feb. 16, with regular retail availability starting March 1.

The LEGO Group provided The Brothers Brick with an early copy of this set for review. Providing TBB with products for review guarantees neither coverage nor positive reviews.

Click to read the full review

Breaking ground and building models

Of course on Instagram and Flickr or wherever else LEGO collections and cities are shown off, one can find plenty of completed modulars and cars, maybe even some small construction vehicles, but Fuku Saku presents us with a highly detailed model of a construction site complete with a skeleton frame of a building and some great vehicles.

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Saku’s vehicles are pretty detailed and are comprised of both large and small parts; an interesting part used in his dump truck would be the battle droid arm utilized on the truck’s backend. Overall both trucks make use of bricks and wheels in addition to a lot of slopes and tiles to achieve a smooth and completed look. The building frame behind the vehicles is notably comprised of many different types of plates but also includes bricks and tiling. In any case Saku’s model is a break from the usual completed buildings.

This stunning DeLorean takes us Back to the Future

One thing we never get tired of here at The Brothers Brick is LEGO versions of the DeLorean from Back to the Future. Yep, it’s pretty much the formula for success around here. Let’s see, the rules are clean photography, good build techniques and DeLoreans from BTTF. Also it doesn’t hurt to mention The Mandalorian or The Child. Alex Jones (no relation to the chemtrails turning frogs gay conspiracy guy) has followed all our rules of success and that is why he’s a frequent flyer here. I love the details, the gull-wing doors, the greebly bits around the back that makes time travel stuff happen. The complex angles are recreated masterfully using some pretty advanced build techniques. Even Marty’s hover-board is represented nicely!

DMC Delorean BTTF2

Oh, the Mandalorian DeLorean. Now that’s a great idea! Somebody get on the horn with Disney and Universal Amblin Entertainment and make that happen!

King Tut and his sphinx-mobile

The classic Batman TV series that ran during the 1960s had its fair share of strange and flamboyant characters – both heroic and villainous. “King Tut”, an Egyptologist at Yale University turned villain due to amnesia, is no exception. LEGO builder Brick Grayson, creates a neat vehicle based on the concept of the Batman villain, and surely it should make any Batman and LEGO fan very content.

The rear portion of the car is surely a reference to the Adventurer’s theme sphinx, almost quoting the original build verbatim. The rest of the model is smoothly fashioned out of bricks, slopes, and tiles; the shape of it resembling the 1989 Batmobile. Of course, the King Tut minifigure from the first Batman Collectible Minifigure series is operating the vehicle. Grayson’s build is his way of celebrating the television series’ 55th anniversary; it’s certainly a worthy model for the occasion.

The cutest rickshaw you ever saw

Or as RJ BrickBuilds likes to call it: a Brickshaw! This has to be one of the most adorable automata RC builds I’ve ever seen. It’s powered by a large LEGO Power Functions motor, IR receiver, and battery box. I love how the elements are hidden in plain sight, as the seat and the little guy’s torso.

I’m not sure what it is about a cartooney character with giant eyes, but you can’t help but smile when you see one. And that’s not the only thing that makes it cute – the waddle-run gives it extra character. He’s working so hard, he deserves a tip! The colorful cart itself is also instantly recognizable, with the Technic panels covering the battery doubling perfectly as a seat blanket.

Click the GIF to see the full Youtube video. And while you’re here, take a look at some of the other excellent kinetic builds we’ve featured.

Yvan drops a powerful Deuce

It is moments like this that make me love this whole Brothers Brick gig. We find something cool while surfing the interwebs such as this custom LEGO Deuce Roadster by Yvan Bourdeau. We share this cool discovery with you. You, in turn, shower us with likes and comments and then maybe you are inspired to build something yourself. Shampoo, rinse, repeat. This custom roadster looks to be dropped, channeled and lowered, giving it a low and aggressive stance. Burnt orange and a light blue makes for a neat flashy color scheme and the exposed exhaust pipes are not without their charms. Throw in a cleanly built base and retro gas pump and you have yourself the makings of a day made just a little sweeter. If you’re like me, vehicles in general would make your heart go pitter-patter so enjoy clicking through the archives.

BURNT ORANGE #34 DEUCE ROADSTER

This Apache helicopter is built from rare and ornery bricks

2004 was a pivotal moment for some adult fans of LEGO. This was the year that defined the distinction between what we call “old gray” and “new gray”. LEGO made a change to two shades of gray and brown that year that made the colors brighter and a bit more palatable to kids. Some grumpy old fans resistant to change declared they would leave the hobby forever while others embraced the newer colors. Lennart Cort dates back to before 2004, or at least some of his LEGO collection does. He tells us this stunning AH-64D Apache Longbow model was built in 1/38 scale and built using “old dark gray” as its primary color. Speaking from experience here this can be a difficult feat as the old gray parts are becoming increasingly rare and ornery. Kinda like older adult fans of LEGO; rare and ornery.

AH-64 Apache