Tag Archives: Greece

These Danish bricks all look so Greek to me..!

Luca Di Lazzaro uses a whole lot of white bricks to recreate this magnificent piece of sunny Greece, which seems to be inspired by a place like Santorini. The local architecture there, famous for its striking mix of white walls and dark blue roofs, seems very clean and primitive. But can you notice all the tiniest details introduced by Luca? Red and blue window frames, blue and white fences, and, of course, brilliant outside decorations made with 1×4 bricks with sand green wallpaper pattern straight from the Batman Classic TV Series – Batcave set.

Meanwhile somewhere in Greece ....

Across the wine-dark sea in his swift, curved-hull ship

Last autumn we featured some adorably tiny Greek galleys, and I noted how unusual Classical LEGO creations are, despite several Greek and Roman soldiers featured among Collectible Minifigures. Rat Dude has built a beautiful forty-oared Greek galley named the Hyperion. While this armchair archaeologist might quibble with the double masts (for a such a small ship), the overall effect from stem to stern is gorgeous. I particularly love what appears to be rams’ heads on the bow, along with the metal ram. The Greek marines on deck look ready to board an enemy vessel!

LEGO Greek galley

Winnow with giant arms the slumbering green

With the Wrath of the Titans contest in full swing over on Flickr, we’re seeing some really great Greco-Roman LEGO models. This Greek temple on a seaside hill by Yacopo looks to have angered an even older power from the deep.

Attack of the Kraken! by Yacopo on Flickr

Notice the stairs leading up to the temple. And the smaller structure in the foreground incorporates a Technic gear as its base.

Ancient Greece was built brick by brick

Lasse and Anne Mette Vestergård displayed their Ancient Greek Lego layout at LEGO World in Copenhagen last month. This diorama is not only impressive for its size but also the architectural details of the Greek buildings that are seldom depicted in Lego. Check out more detail shots on Lasse’s Flickr.