Tag Archives: Vignette

Vignettes are like the haiku of the LEGO world. Usually built on a base 8 studs wide by 8 studs deep, vignettes show a little scene or a moment in time. But like written poetry, there’s plenty of variation on the basic theme.

Happy Pancake Day!

UK based builder Nick Sweetman has created a fantastic build for Pancake Day (also known as Shrove Tuesday). My new favorite LEGO creature – the lobster – is helping himself to a bottle of something from the sink as the Chef and his new apprentice create delicious floor pancakes for the annual holiday. But I guess you should expect floor pancakes when you hire a butcher to operate the frying pan!

Pancake Day

All we need is a bit of wind to grind the grain

Windmills have been utilising the energy of the wind power to automate tasks such as water pumping of grain grinding since 500-900 A.D. in Persia. This LEGO windmill by Issac S was inspired by some of the windmills seen in the video game Skyrim and was built for the 2017 Brickstory contest in the Early Middle Age category. The textured stone base of the windmill contrasts nicely with the wood and lighter stone central section and inspired use of the upturned barrel is the cherry on top.

Holt Windmill

The model features working windmill blades and a grindstone that are simultaneously operated by a crank on the back of the windmill. Issac has shared a video of this feature in action.

If you want to read more about the landscaping and, in particular, the tree seen in the left hand corner of this build, Issac has shared a tutorial. Originally this technique was used by Joeri Riddler and Issac has unpacked the design to allow others to develop the technique.

A bit of LEGO love

It’s Valentine’s today, and what better way to celebrate than with a bit of LEGO love, in the form of a an over-eager minifigure Cupid shooting heart tiles at random passersby?

Love In The Park

The custom prints in this model are terrific, from the emotive expressions on the figures to the little hearts tiles. Interestingly, the Fabuland and Rebrick torsos are original.

Star Wars: Uncertain Ways – an original LEGO Star Wars vignette series

We have featured Ordo‘s work before with his recording studio and RWBY diorama, but until now we hadn’t featured any of the builder’s brilliant original Star Wars vignettes. In the scene below — the fourteenth in Ordo’s series — a beautifully constructed background creates the perfect staging for a great action-packed scene on the back of the seriously listing speeder.  With its bonnet stripes made from minifig seats, wind shields made from sunroof visors sitting in hinge pieces and lovely natural looking effect of the flaming engine, it is truly the star of this vignette. But the masterstroke is the unseen fate of the smoking abandoned speeder bike plowing into a wall at 400 mph somewhere left purely to the imagination.

Going down - Star Wars "Uncertain Ways" 1.14

Click the photo to see the builder’s backstory for the scene, and check out some of Ordo’s other episodes below.

At the temple - Star Wars "Uncertain ways" 1.2   "I am ready for the trials !" - Star Wars "Uncertain ways" 1.5 Off into the sunset ! - Star Wars "Uncertain Ways" 1.9    Hot pursuit - Star Wars "Uncertain Ways" 1.13

The scenes are beautiful, the story is compelling, and I really want to know what happens next! Read all fourteen episodes yourself in Ordo’s photostream.

Rollin’ on a Hot Rod on Route 66

This little road trip has got lots of details going on by Thomas W. First of all, you can’t miss the Hot Rod that’s built to perfection. I love the subtle details like uneven, worn-out road and the Route 66 sign that’s about to tumble over. The details of the flora and fauna are great too—in case you missed the perched vulture. The exposed LEGO studs make for natural detailing on the saguaro, too.

Red 66

Back to a time when LEGO meant wooden tractors

LEGO wasn’t always about plastic bricks. Back in 1932, Ole Kirk Kristiansen, a master carpenter and joiner, establishes his business in the village of Billund, Denmark. Ole’s firm manufactures stepladders, ironing boards, stools and wooden toys. By the early 1950s, LEGO was producing not just wooden toys; plastic toys account for half of the company’s output. The older wooden toys remain in circulation today, often as rare or collector items depending on their condition. Bailey Fullarton has used an apt mix of an original wooden LEGO tractor from the late 1940s/early 1950s and the plastic parts we all know and love to show off the vintage toy.

By the Creek

The LEGO Group’s many wooden and plastic products from the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s took inspiration from social change and technological progress. In the early 1950s, the LEGO Group set up production of a Ferguson tractor in plastic. A range of implements is also available for the new toy tractor, including a cultivator and a plough, for hitching on the back of the tractor. These implements fit not only the plastic Ferguson tractor, but also the wooden tractors that are also part of the LEGO® products at the time. The collection below shows the same tractor as Bailey used bit in better condition and with some of the accessories for working the land.

Lego Wood Tractor Series

I personally prefer Bailey’s worn tractor with its played with, nostalgic feel.  I get the impression the tractor has had a hard life as a toy and now it is resting by the creek, enjoying the peace and quiet of retirement.

Vignettes from How I Met Your Mother

How I Met Your Mother, for those of you who don’t know, is a romantic comedy about 6 friends and their everyday stories told from Ted’s viewpoint. The entire premise (surprise!) is Ted telling his kids the story of how he met their mother. It took him 9 seasons finish telling that story! It kept viewers guessing who was Ted’s wife all along. Builder Sascha is clearly a huge fan, and he’s built a series of vignettes from a few key scenes that fans should love and remember.

That famous yellow umbrella in the final episode

Tracy & Ted

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Microscale LEGO model evokes the indie game Journey with just a few pieces

The adventures of Master Chief and Marcus Fenix I get as an Xbox player are great and all, but it’s becoming clear I’m missing out on great games on PlayStation like The Last of Us and Journey. Mel F. shows love for the critically acclaimed indie title Journey in a vignette full of clever parts usage. Unikitty tails in tan and the arms of the chicken suit minifigure show the flow of a sandstorm, and a dark red minifigure fan as the playable robed character also evokes movement.

Journey (Micro)

Forge your legend in Destiny’s Old Russia

Like many Destiny players, I have spent many hours grinding out XP slaying Fallen in Old Russia’s Cosmodrome. Without even reading the title of this build from Nick Della Mora, I knew it was specifically The Divide region of the Cosmodrome. That particular group of buildings are recognizable, as many Dregs and Shanks have been sniped from atop them.

The Divide - Overall

But for me, the highlight of the build is the Fallen Walker. It is not only accurate in its aesthetics; it waddles like the one in game, and the head slides out, exposing and illuminating the weak spot. Watch these functions, and an overview of the whole scene, in the following video.

A blip patrols the executive corridor in Alpha Zero Niner

At first glance Jeremy Williams‘ Night Patrol might not look like much is going on, but this atmospheric space corridor with patrolling “blip” is fantastic. Simple yet brilliant, I love the clever use of the 1×4 spring shooter for the door details. Combined with clever creative lighting, the scene feels real. You can almost feel the silence, waiting for the whhhhhsht of the door as it opens and the automated electronic beep as the blip passes through. Then whhhhhsht the door closes again, leaving the corridor silent and empty once more.

Night Patrol

When LEGO needs a trim, use a LEGO mower

We have all been there: it’s summertime and the plate grass is getting long… well Anthony Séjourné has sorted out our lawnmower needs with his excellent LEGO mower.  The garden gnome has sought a place of safety as this is a serious looking mower — look at the beautifully neat grass it is leaving in its wake! Using layered plates for the grass was an extra step well worth the effort to ensure the tiled cut grass is below the level of the top plate. This is a cute little scene that really shows how to highlight this small mower model in the best light.

The lawnmower itself is a great little build with nice curvy shape and good use of the Bionicle mechanical arm to create the angles and attachment for the handle.

My only issue is that I cannot work out where the cut grass has gone?

LEGO Primitive Technology tiled roof hut

To an untrained eye, this mud hut by Magma Guy might seem like just another medieval farmer’s house, but I assure you, this is placed in current time, in our world. Inspired by the Youtube phenomenon Primitive Technology, Magma has recreated the focal point of the Youtube channel’s most popular video, Primitive Technology: Tiled Roof Hut, which has over 21 million views and shows the process of building a simple structure completely from scratch. The model has all the details captured exceptionally well, from the ceramic roof tiles, to the rock and mud walls, as well as the stone foundation and a picture-perfect recreation of the stick door. The scenery is also complete with some ceramic pots and the “Primitive Technology” guy with a resin torch.

Primitive technology - tiled roof hut

As a great fan of the videos myself, this creation means even more to me personally, especially the extra photo showcasing some of the creations from Primitive Technology’s other videos.

Primitive technology - other videos