Tag Archives: Vignette

Vignettes are like the haiku of the LEGO world. Usually built on a base 8 studs wide by 8 studs deep, vignettes show a little scene or a moment in time. But like written poetry, there’s plenty of variation on the basic theme.

Watch a miniature LEGO Batcave being built [Video]

LEGO builder AnkTales enjoys creating nifty little scenes and animating the construction process, giving viewers a look at precisely what parts go into his builds. His latest creation is a miniature Batcave to showcase LEGO’s official mini Tumbler model. You could easily build your own Batcave by watching the video.

And if you happen to not own the 30300 LEGO Tumbler set, AnkTale helpfully provides a construction mini Batman Tumbler video to create your own, and the best part is that it doesn’t use any rare pieces.

Encounter in the Library of the Undead

Deus Otiosus imagines a cartoony LEGO fantasy in this dungeon scene. It shows an encounter between five heroes and two skeleton warriors – one a human and the other a dragon. The library has just the right amount of worn-down feel, and the heroes all have their own personality evoked through their construction and posing. The skeletons are my favorite part of the scene — I like the contrast between thin pieces like robot arms, horns, and technic rods, with relatively thicker pieces such as plates and bricks.

Library of the Undead

See the standalone setting and the characters on Deus’s Flickr stream.

A windswept hobbit escape

This diorama by TBB’s own contributor Jen Spencer depicts the scene from The Fellowship of the Ring at the Prancing Pony Inn just after the wraiths swoop in and stab the beds that the Hobbits are supposed to be sleeping in. The windswept atmosphere and dishevelled room is beautifully illustrated by the thrown-open window with curtains blowing, the overturned stool, pictures awry and—my own favourite part—the mattress that is askew.

A Knife in the Dark

This diorama really captures the imagination. Even if you have not seen this scene in the movie, it is clear that someone has left the room in a hurry and something sinister is going on. Jen’s diorama is actually an entry into the 2016 Middle Earth Lego Olympics over on MOC pages. Good luck to all the competitors currently flexing their Middle Earth muscles!

An epic LEGO tale of death

This fantastic vingette by Thorsten Bonsch is a LEGO recreation of a scene from the Elder Scrolls Online (ESO). The ESO is an online multiplayer role playing game and this particular scene comes from the latest part of the saga, The Thieves Guild. The build is not an action scene but, as Thorsten calls it, a ‘still life’ that tells a story – can you imagine what happened by looking at the evidence left behind?


The builder uses a great building technique to curve the bricks and allow the ground to slope gently upwards to the right side. In addition, the rock formations are very nicely shaped and hints of colour are just enough to capture your attention. The more I look at this scene, the more intriguing I find it.

Personally, I think that a huge snake-like creature has eaten the first man and then reaches the second and kills him just as he mortally wounds the snake with a spear to the heart. All that remains are the bones and undigested evidence that tells the story of their deaths.

Previous ESO-based creations by Thorsten have been blogged by us and are worth a second look: the City of Orsinium, the Stonefalls in Morrowind, and an amazing 11,000 piece portal called The Dolmen.

Not just a tree house, but a LEGO tree fort

Did you have a tree house as a child?  jsnyder would have been very disappointed by my basic tree house if his LEGO tree fort reflects his idea of one.  This creation is on three levels with a swing bridge that spans across two huge trees.  There is a look out at the top of the largest tree with a telescope to keep an eye out for potential attack (or parents looking for you at bedtime). The trees themselves are well shaped and I love the mix of studs on show and tiles to add texture.

Billy's Tree Fort

The details are really adorable in this build, for example the tyre swing and rope pulley system to allow a crate of resupplies (perhaps more ice lollies) to be lifted high up into the tree.

Billy's Tree Fort

You can see more detailed views of the tree fort on his Billy’s Tree Fort album on Flickr.

“I’ll chase him round Good Hope, and round the Horn, and round the Norway Maelstrom, and round perdition’s flames before I give him up!”

Moby Dick is one of those novels that requires real commitment to get through, with its lengthy diversions and deep symbolism, but rewards careful reading and sticks with you for decades afterward. It also makes for great LEGO inspiration, as Ryan Rubino’s white whale battling a giant squid from back in 2009 certainly proves. Letranger Absurde enters the fray with Captain Ahab entangled by the line from his own harpoon, hauled to his doom in the dark deeps of the sea. The sperm whale itself steals the spotlight in this build, with what appears to be a surfboard for a tongue, but don’t miss the excellent sea floor, complete with conch shell, brain coral, and even a treasure chest.

Moby Dick

The austere beauty of pure geometry

Although LEGO bricks and plates are regular symmetrical figures, rarely do we come across creations based on perfect geometry. Hanging Gardens by Letranger Absurde is a modest architectural masterpiece built around harmony and symmetry. Because of the fact that the model was photographed at 45 degrees angle and all the surfaces are carefully tiled, it looks totally like a level from the Monument Valley video game. Bonus points are for falling water: the building technique is brilliant, especially the use of Mixels tooth bricks as water foam.

Hanging Gardens

27 amazing LEGO vignettes bring Harry Potter to life

The amazing world of Harry Potter is only made more fantastic when portrayed through tiny LEGO vignettes. When we first spotted Marcel V.s series of astounding little Harry Potter scenes, he’d only created 5. He’s created them as a personal project to challenge himself throughout the month of March, producing almost one every day, and he’s now reached 27. Marcel tells us he worked 3-4 hours daily to create the scenes, and relied on inspiration from the books, movies, and even some Harry Potter games.

Come with me on a magical journey through the life of The Boy Who Lived.

#020 -  (The) Fluffy awakens

Click to look through Harry Potter’s life in LEGO

The history of art and architecture in a single LEGO monument

Toltomeja captures the evolution of art and architecture through iconic scenes pictured along the face of a mountain. From the paintings in the Lascaux Caves to abstract modern art, the builder captures 10 historical eras and their signature styles. You can discover each scene by checking out more photos and descriptions on Flickr.

The Mountain of Art

The Mountain of Art

When one world is not enough, you just need an escape route

Sometimes life can become routine and monotonous, giving no rest or calm. But Angelo_S. reminds us that when everything around is dull and cold and gray, there’s always an escape.

Rømningsvei

This work is a beautiful metaphor combining two opposed worlds in one shot. A skillfully executed microscale vignette seen through the gateway looks twice as alluring due to the forced perspective effect.

To burn an empire

Only the baddest of the bad could go up against the might of Rome and come out on top. That’s what infamous Gaelic chieftain Vercingetorix did at the hilly battle of Gerogvia (to none other than Julius Caesar) in 52 BC; and now in 2016, we see his pyrrhic victory come to life in the latest creation by legophthalmos. Clearly this is one barbarian you don’t want to mess with.

Vercingetorix by legophthalmos