Tag Archives: Halo

Another construction toy brand might have the Halo license, but that doesn’t stop LEGO fans from building characters, vehicles, and locations inspired by the venerable Xbox series from Bungie and Microsoft. Check out Pelicans, Warthogs, the Master Chief, and more LEGO Halo weapons than you can shake your armored fist at right here on The Brothers Brick.

LEGO Architecture Forerunner Spire from Halo (no, not really)

The LEGO Halo group over on Flickr is hosting a contest that challenges LEGO builders to design their own sets to counter the fact that one of LEGO’s competitors has the Halo license.

Théo (Titolian) joins the fray with this fake LEGO Architecture set. It’s an interesting little structure, wonderfully presented and immediately recognizable.

Forerunner Spire

(And please, dear readers, do not suggest — as several on Flickr already have — that this would be a great LEGO CUUSOO project. Ain’t gonna happen…)

An Exception to Every Rule

I try to avoid posting LEGO creations based on the Halo games; there are simply too many of them around, and I don’t really think anyone wants to see another attempt at a Warthog. This diorama by legomocs. forced my hand, though. The micro scale frigate is nicely rendered, as is the accompanying Covenant spire, but neither is what caught my attention. The shape of the diorama and the angle of the ship combine to give this creation a great sense of motion. It’s difficult not to imagine the continuing flight path of the frigate, after seeing this one moment caught in time.

UNSC Grafton

Lego Halo Reach M45 Tactical Shotgun

Nick Jensen has used Lego to build most of the human weapons from Halo. His latest LEGO Halo model is the M45 Tactical Shotgun, which took almost 2 months to make. In addition to its realistic looks, the model also has working features such as a sliding pump and ejecting shells, which you can see on YouTube.

Halo Reach M45 Tactical Shotgun

Halo Reach M45 Tactical Shotgun

Top 10 most popular LEGO models of 2011

We’ve taken a look at the top LEGO news stories of 2011, but The Brothers Brick is really about the great LEGO creations built by LEGO fans all over the world. Let’s take a look back at the ones that proved most popular over the course of the year.

  1. Plum B’s LEGO Gears of War Lancer assault rifle with firing action and motorized saw blade

LEGO Gears of War Lancer assault rifle with firing action and motorized saw blade

  1. Nick Jensen’s life-sized LEGO Halo sniper rifle
  2. Marshall Banana’s 10,000 piece LEGO Star Wars Jawa Sandcrawler


  1. Will Page’s Portal turret
  2. Michael Thomas’s LEGO Settlers of Catan design
  3. ShoBrick’s post-apocalyptic stormtroopers
  4. Nathaniel Shields’s LEGO Halo grunt
  5. OneLug’s 7-foot LEGO Tower of Orthanc from Lord of the Rings

The Last March of the Ents

  1. Ben Caulkins’s life-size LEGO Halo Master Chief armor
  2. Chris Malloy’s LEGO Minecraft diorama

Life-sized Halo sniper rifle built with LEGO

Nick Jensen finished his most ambitious LEGO Halo project yet of building the Sniper Rifle System 99 Anti-Matériel (commonly known as the Halo sniper rifle) for his arsenal of brick-built Halo weapons. I asked the builder to share the process of making the SR99 from inspiration to the finished model. Here is his response.

Halo: Reach SRS99 Anti-Matériel

How It Started

The graphics of Halo: Reach blew me away when I first played it. Textures, environments, and character designs all impressed me, but as a LEGO gun builder, I was most impressed with the detail of all the guns. Since then, I built the pistol and combat knife from Halo: Reach. I wanted to build more weapons from Halo: Reach and I was debating between the shotgun and the sniper rifle. I had the parts and money to make one of them. I went with the shotgun but got really frustrated when I couldn’t find a way to make the pump slide back and forth in the front. So I gave up and started the sniper rifle.

I captured many close-up screenshots of the sniper rifle in Halo: Reach’s theater mode, looked up information about the gun on halopedian.com, used the Halo: Reach action figures from McFarlane, and looked at Perry B.’s version as references. I wanted to include as many details as I possibly can squeeze in. I wanted the final MOC to be perfect.

Halo: Reach SRS99 Anti-Matériel

The Build Process

One of the first things I worried about when I decided on building the sniper rifle was the length. It seemed that I would never build something that was going to be 5.5ft long. I thought about the project from another perspective: building the sniper rifle is like building the assault rifle but with a really long barrel. Breaking the project down into three simple parts (body, barrel, and scope) really eased some doubts I had. The sniper rifle in Halo: Reach is approximately 5.5ft long, so a tape measure locked at 5.5ft was always around for reference. I built the body of the sniper the same way I built the assault rifle, SMG, and pistol: Start from the front and build my way to the back. The barrel was easy and I had a plan in mind from the start. I would cover a supporting rod with 2×2 quarter cylinder bricks. So the only difficult tasks were the body and scope.


I did drop the gun once during the WIP stage. I got impatient and wanted to hold it as if it were finished, and it fell to the ground. There was another time later on where the front grip collapsed because of its weight.


Length: 63 inches (1.6 meters)
Weight: Approximately 10.5 pounds
Non-LEGO used: dowel rod, custom waterslide decals
Features: Removable magazine, sliding bolt, moving safety
Time spent building: about 4 months
Piece count: uhh…?

More pictures

Halo: Reach SRS99 Anti-Matériel

New BrickForge Shock Trooper armor & printed accessories [Review]

As readers will have noticed in our LEGO News feed last week, custom minifig accessory vendor BrickForge has just released a new batch of items, including a new “Shock Trooper” armor. We ordered a couple batches, and I managed to find enough sunshine in the Seattle “summer” to take a few pictures.

ODST Squad: 105th Shock Troops Division ODST Squad: <CLASSIFIED> Division

The armor comes in a sort of steel color that’s rather lovely, along with black that has a similar metallic sheen. Neither color really matches typical colors available for minifig legs and torsos, but they combine reasonably well with neutral colors like bley and black. BrickForge also offers two printed variants, with an eagle on the gray and a flaming skull on the black. I’ll be interested to see how other customizers use these helmets and armor, but I focused on their inevitable use as ODSTs from Halo. Armor for a squad of six will run you a bit over $20.

One of the few areas in which BrickForge and BrickArms overlap is in items inspired (a safe assumption, I think) by the Halo universe, so minifig customizers have a bit more choice in this area. I like to mix and match custom parts from everybody, and I have to admit that I personally prefer the BrickArms versions of these sci-fi weapons (including the previously reviewed BrickArms minigun). I think the combination of the BrickForge armor and BrickArms weapons is undeniably awesome — “better together,” as I always say.

I cracked myself up by putting one of the troopers on a BrickForge scooter, which my wife dubbed the UNSC “Shrew”. I was amused enough that I would like to share this little masterpiece with the world. You’re welcome.

UNSC "Shrew" Tactical Scooter

As fun as a couple squads of Orbital Drop Shock Troopers might be, I had the most fun putting together the Avengers — inspired by the blue helmet with an A and the big American shield that begged themselves to be equipped on a classic Captain America. Wolverine (with BrickForge “Savage Mask”) and Thor (BrickForge hammer) quickly followed, supplemented by a HAZEL-helmeted Iron Man, official Spider-Man, and my old Hulk.


The ODSTs and Avengers were distracting enough that I didn’t get a chance to do much with the test tubes, bottles, martini glasses, and other new glassware BrickForge has just released. Briefly, they complement official LEGO items nicely, and I’m highly entertained by the idea of minifigs squaring off against each other in tiny bar fights with broken bottles.