Tag Archives: Art

Some LEGO builders elevate the form to fine art in its own right, while others enjoy reproducing famous works of art with the brick. Find beautiful and thought-provoking LEGO artwork right here.

Self-portrait bust in LEGO bricks

Julius von Brunk built this amazing self-portrait bust in LEGO bricks. There’s great brickwork here, capturing the curves, planes, and lines of a head and face more accurately than you’d expect possible using plastic blocks. But for me, the main attraction is that raised eyebrow. It transforms this from being a cool technical achievement into a genuine portrait with a sense of character.

All we are is dust in the wind

The stunningly accurate classic-rock album covers just keep coming! Following the Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd album covers we featured this month, comes W. Navarre‘s terrific LEGO version of Kansas’ Point of Know Return. Compare Navarre’s version to the original cover and you’ll see that he nailed it. I particularly love the Kansas lettering and eclipsed sun. I’m crossing my fingers that album covers will become a new LEGO building style after this bombardment of awesomeness.

Kansas Album Cover

Life-sized LEGO Led Zeppelin IV vinyl album cover

Hot on the heels of the Division Bell album cover comes another amazing LEGO classic rock album cover. This time builder David Zambito created Led Zeppelin’s untitled fourth album (nicknamed “Zoso” or just “IV” by fans). The album is widely considered to be Zeppelin’s best (the final song is “Stairway to Heaven” after all), and looks phenomenal in brick.

Led Zeppelin IV

Take a look at the original cover art and judge for yourself whether or not Zambito nailed the conversion into LEGO. The background looks like peeling tree bark and the hunched posture of the old man is spot on. Even better, the build appears to be about the size of a vinyl cardboard sleeve.

Not just another brick in the wall

Check out this rockin’ Pink Floyd album cover recreated in LEGO! Builder James Bailey captured the iconic 1994 album cover of The Division Bell perfectly by using SNOT (“studs not on top”) and forced perspective. Fun fact: Storm Elvin Thorgerson, the English graphic designer who created this and dozens of other album covers (including Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon, Led Zeppelin’s Houses of the Holy, and Muse’s Black Holes and Revelations) said that this artwork was intended to represent the absence of former band members Syd Barrett and Roger Waters. Pretty neat, huh?

Division Bell

The history of art and architecture in a single LEGO monument

Toltomeja captures the evolution of art and architecture through iconic scenes pictured along the face of a mountain. From the paintings in the Lascaux Caves to abstract modern art, the builder captures 10 historical eras and their signature styles. You can discover each scene by checking out more photos and descriptions on Flickr.

The Mountain of Art

The Mountain of Art

Celebrate Easter with beautiful LEGO jewelled eggs

Dutch builder Koen has created a set of beautiful Faberge-style jewelled eggs. What better way to celebrate Easter weekend with your favourite construction system?

These creations are packed with nice parts usage to get the details and sparkling metallic effects. Check out the stands too — great stuff. We’ve previously featured the beautiful red egg in the center; the green and blue ones are being featured here for the first time.

The Jewelled Egg Collection

Even better, the eggs open up to reveal appropriate minifigs for each egg’s theme: Spring, Love, and Ice…

The Jewelled Egg Collection

A brick-built home: incredible LEGO modern kitchen

Tim Schwalfenberg is trying to fool us with this kitchen photograph, which appears to be a gorgeous modern kitchen in an upscale home decor magazine. Look closely, though, and you’ll notice that it is completely LEGO. There are lots of great details here, but I like the train wheels for barstool cushions, and the tiled backsplash, which just looks perfectly realistic.

What's Cooking?

And if you enjoy large-scale modern home interiors made of LEGO, then you’ll definitely want to check out Littlehaulic’s builds:

Modern kitchen and dining room
Modern bedroom and den
Full beach house interior

LEGO coat of arms of Austria

Let uncle Clinton tell you a story: In fourth grade my school put on a play focused around traveling the world, and my input was drawing and painting the flags and insignia of the various countries. Do you know how difficult it is to create an accurate, full size Indian flag with fourth grade art supplies and no artistic talent?

Anyway, I now have a deep appreciation for symbols like that, and it’s why I appreciate this build from “kofi” even more. From Vorarlberg to Burgenland, the builder has created the coat of arms for each of the nine states in the federation of Austria. Zoom right in on this one and appreciate all the detailing pulled off at this small scale.

Die 9 Bundesländer

The theory of colour in LEGO

Li Li (lisqr) has been exploring building with angles on his own blog and he utilises one technique in this latest build, Spectrum.  By off-setting the far end of each level of brick, Li Li has created an ingenious twisting sculpture that displays the visual spectrum in LEGO colours.

Spectrum

This is a lovely work of art and crosses the line between LEGO creation, art and science in a beautiful fashion. The birds eye view show the spectrum of colours in all their splendour.

Spectrum

LEGO mosaic of Hokusai’s “The Great Wave off Kanagawa”

When Iain blogged Alanboar Cheung‘s timely sculpture of Alan Rickman earlier today, I was reminded that I’d also been intending to highlight his excellent LEGO mosaic of 19th-century Japanese woodblock artist Hokusai’s famous print of “The Great Wave off Kanagawa.” For several years when I lived in Yokohama, I had a similarly distant but much less dramatic view of Mount Fuji, which I particularly enjoyed during the winter when the mountain’s peak was capped with snow. Alanboar’s mosaic uses a “studs up” technique, stacking LEGO plates rather than attaching them “studs out” on a baseplate.

LEGO The Great Wave off Kanagawa 神奈川沖浪裏

For John

Art in all its forms is a means of expression, be that joy, sadness, humour, grief, love. In the LEGO community it is not surprising that we turn to our bricks as a method of processing and dealing with emotions.  This touching build by Chris Maddison is his tribute to a friend who sadly passed away too young. Sometimes it is best to just let a build speak for itself.

For John

For those of us who choose to build with small plastic bricks, the actual act of carefully placing bricks together becomes therapeutic.

The final creation often expresses far more than words could ever say.